title

The Pay Check

Bloomberg

20
Followers
8
Plays
The Pay Check
The Pay Check

The Pay Check

Bloomberg

20
Followers
8
Plays
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About Us

It’s a big, expensive, global mystery. Why do women still make less money—a lot less—than men? In the US, the average woman makes 80 cents to every dollar a man makes. The Pay Check is an in-depth investigation into what that 20 percent difference looks like. In this miniseries we show you how the gender pay gap plays out in real life. We hear from Lilly Ledbetter, Mo’Nique, and a lot of other women who weren’t happy to be paid less. We find out what happens when a whole country tries to tackle the pay gap. And we see how some women are taking things into their own hands.

Latest Episodes

Coming Soon: Travel Genius Season 2

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2 MIN3 w ago
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Coming Soon: Travel Genius Season 2

Introducing Prognosis Season 3: Superbugs

On this new season of Prognosis, we look at the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. You're probably more likely to have heard of these as superbugs. Their rise has been described as a silent tsunami of catastrophic proportions. We travel to countries on the frontline of the crisis, and explore how hospitals and doctors around the world are fighting back. Prognosis’ new season launches Sept. 5.

3 MINAUG 27
Comments
Introducing Prognosis Season 3: Superbugs

Live From London: Equal Pay for Equal Play

The Pay Check is back with a bonus episode on gender equality in women’s soccer. A few months ago, the US women’s soccer team filed a pay discrimination lawsuit alleging that they do not get equal pay for equal work. The US women’s team is far more successful, by many metrics, than the men’s team, but they make half as much. Globally, the story is much more complicated. Rebecca Greenfield talks with Eben Novy Williams about the fight for equality in the US and then heads to Bloomberg’s UK Equality Summit for our first ever live taping to talk with English soccer legend Kelly Smith, head of the Women’s Super League Kelly Simmons and Lenah Ueltzen-Gabell about the fight for equal treatment in the UK.

32 MINMAY 23
Comments
Live From London: Equal Pay for Equal Play

Help Wanted

During World War II, the influx of women workers into the workforce solved one problem—the labor shortage—while creating another: Who would watch the kids? To address it, the U.S. government created high-quality, publicly-funded childcare centers for working moms. In this season’s final episode of The Pay Check, we explore the long term effects of this brief government experiment. We ask what it would take, short of a war, to generate a similar groundswell of public support for mothers in the workforce. And we question the assumption that mothers alone are responsible for creating the infrastructure that enables them to work.

28 MINMAY 15
Comments
Help Wanted

The No-Child Policy

For the last few weeks, we’ve been talking about how having kids makes it hard for women to work for pay. But there’s a flip side to that: Because it’s so hard for women to work for pay when they have kids, more and more just aren’t having them. This is a problem all over the developed world, and since population growth is a big part of economic growth, these countries are desperately trying to boost fertility rates. China in particular is in deep trouble: after almost 40 years of the One-Child Policy, the population could start shrinking within a few years. We head to China to see how the country is attempting to get women to have kids — and why it’s not working.

26 MINMAY 8
Comments
The No-Child Policy

Introducing: Business of Bees

These days about one in three bites of food you eat wouldn’t be possible without commercial bee pollination. And the economic value of insect pollination worldwide is estimated to be about $217 billion. But as important as bees have become for farming, there’s also increasing signs that bees are in trouble. In the decade-plus since the first cases of Colony Collapse Disorder were reported, bees are still dying in record numbers, and important questions remain unanswered. On this new miniseries, host Adam Allington and environment reporters David Schultz and Tiffany Stecker travel to all corners of the honeybee ecosystem from Washington, D.C., to the California almond fields, and orchards of the upper Midwest to find answers to these questions.

3 MINMAY 7
Comments
Introducing: Business of Bees

What About Dads?

When we talk about the gender pay gap, we’re talking about a ratio: how much women make compared to men. We’ve spent the last three weeks talking about what happens to women’s earnings when they become moms. This week, we look at the other side of the ratio: Men—or more generally, secondary caregivers. When men become dads, their earnings get a boost, a phenomenon known as the fatherhood bonus. But if they try to do more at home than established gender norms say they should, they too are penalized. Susan Berfield tells the story of Kevin Knussman, a police officer whose career suffered when he tried to take time off to care for his wife and new baby. Then we talk to Alexis Ohanian, aka Mr. Serena Williams, about how we can actually get men to be more involved dads.

26 MINMAY 1
Comments
What About Dads?

The Bad Economics of Childcare

We know working moms make less than men partly because they work fewer hours, and one of the main reasons for that is: childcare. Because, well: someone has to take care of the kids. In this episode, we dig into the economics of childcare, which are bad. Women either get pushed out of the workforce altogether, or have to take lower paying jobs to meet childcare needs. There are places, like Singapore, where childcare is cheap and plentiful, allowing women to stay in the workforce. It’s great for working women, but what about the women taking care of the kids? Tomoko Yamazaki reports from our Singapore bureau on the life of Romina Novato, a domestic worker in Singapore.

23 MINAPR 24
Comments
The Bad Economics of Childcare

Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

On this new show from Bloomberg, hosts Mike Regan and Sarah Ponczek speak with expert guests each week about the main themes influencing global markets. They explore everything from stocks to bonds to currencies and commodities, and how each asset class affects trading in the others. Whether you’re a financial professional or just a curious retirement saver, What Goes Up keeps you apprised of the latest buzz on Wall Street and what the wildest movements in markets will mean for your investments.

2 MINAPR 18
Comments
Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

The Pregnant Pause

In this episode, we begin at the beginning: with pregnancy. Women with kids get sidelined at work even before they arrive. From the moment a woman gets pregnant—or reaches the age when she might get pregnant—she's seen as a financial liability. Companies would rather not have to deal with pregnant women at all—and sometimes, they don't. Claire Suddath delves into the history of laws against pregnancy discrimination and explains how they can still fail to protect women. And Jordyn Holman tells the story of Brittany Noble Jones, a TV anchor who says she was pushed out of a job because of her pregnancy.

33 MINAPR 17
Comments
The Pregnant Pause

Latest Episodes

Coming Soon: Travel Genius Season 2

Bloomberg's Travel Genius podcast is back! After clocking another hundred-thousand miles in the sky, hosts Nikki Ekstein and Mark Ellwood have a whole new series of flight hacking, restaurant sleuthing, and hotel booking tips to inspire your own getaways—along with a who's who roster of itinerant pros ready to spill their own travel secrets. From a special episode on Disney to a master class on packing, we'll go high, low, east, west, and everywhere in between. The new season starts Nov. 6.

2 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Coming Soon: Travel Genius Season 2

Introducing Prognosis Season 3: Superbugs

On this new season of Prognosis, we look at the spread of infections that are resistant to antimicrobial medicines. You're probably more likely to have heard of these as superbugs. Their rise has been described as a silent tsunami of catastrophic proportions. We travel to countries on the frontline of the crisis, and explore how hospitals and doctors around the world are fighting back. Prognosis’ new season launches Sept. 5.

3 MINAUG 27
Comments
Introducing Prognosis Season 3: Superbugs

Live From London: Equal Pay for Equal Play

The Pay Check is back with a bonus episode on gender equality in women’s soccer. A few months ago, the US women’s soccer team filed a pay discrimination lawsuit alleging that they do not get equal pay for equal work. The US women’s team is far more successful, by many metrics, than the men’s team, but they make half as much. Globally, the story is much more complicated. Rebecca Greenfield talks with Eben Novy Williams about the fight for equality in the US and then heads to Bloomberg’s UK Equality Summit for our first ever live taping to talk with English soccer legend Kelly Smith, head of the Women’s Super League Kelly Simmons and Lenah Ueltzen-Gabell about the fight for equal treatment in the UK.

32 MINMAY 23
Comments
Live From London: Equal Pay for Equal Play

Help Wanted

During World War II, the influx of women workers into the workforce solved one problem—the labor shortage—while creating another: Who would watch the kids? To address it, the U.S. government created high-quality, publicly-funded childcare centers for working moms. In this season’s final episode of The Pay Check, we explore the long term effects of this brief government experiment. We ask what it would take, short of a war, to generate a similar groundswell of public support for mothers in the workforce. And we question the assumption that mothers alone are responsible for creating the infrastructure that enables them to work.

28 MINMAY 15
Comments
Help Wanted

The No-Child Policy

For the last few weeks, we’ve been talking about how having kids makes it hard for women to work for pay. But there’s a flip side to that: Because it’s so hard for women to work for pay when they have kids, more and more just aren’t having them. This is a problem all over the developed world, and since population growth is a big part of economic growth, these countries are desperately trying to boost fertility rates. China in particular is in deep trouble: after almost 40 years of the One-Child Policy, the population could start shrinking within a few years. We head to China to see how the country is attempting to get women to have kids — and why it’s not working.

26 MINMAY 8
Comments
The No-Child Policy

Introducing: Business of Bees

These days about one in three bites of food you eat wouldn’t be possible without commercial bee pollination. And the economic value of insect pollination worldwide is estimated to be about $217 billion. But as important as bees have become for farming, there’s also increasing signs that bees are in trouble. In the decade-plus since the first cases of Colony Collapse Disorder were reported, bees are still dying in record numbers, and important questions remain unanswered. On this new miniseries, host Adam Allington and environment reporters David Schultz and Tiffany Stecker travel to all corners of the honeybee ecosystem from Washington, D.C., to the California almond fields, and orchards of the upper Midwest to find answers to these questions.

3 MINMAY 7
Comments
Introducing: Business of Bees

What About Dads?

When we talk about the gender pay gap, we’re talking about a ratio: how much women make compared to men. We’ve spent the last three weeks talking about what happens to women’s earnings when they become moms. This week, we look at the other side of the ratio: Men—or more generally, secondary caregivers. When men become dads, their earnings get a boost, a phenomenon known as the fatherhood bonus. But if they try to do more at home than established gender norms say they should, they too are penalized. Susan Berfield tells the story of Kevin Knussman, a police officer whose career suffered when he tried to take time off to care for his wife and new baby. Then we talk to Alexis Ohanian, aka Mr. Serena Williams, about how we can actually get men to be more involved dads.

26 MINMAY 1
Comments
What About Dads?

The Bad Economics of Childcare

We know working moms make less than men partly because they work fewer hours, and one of the main reasons for that is: childcare. Because, well: someone has to take care of the kids. In this episode, we dig into the economics of childcare, which are bad. Women either get pushed out of the workforce altogether, or have to take lower paying jobs to meet childcare needs. There are places, like Singapore, where childcare is cheap and plentiful, allowing women to stay in the workforce. It’s great for working women, but what about the women taking care of the kids? Tomoko Yamazaki reports from our Singapore bureau on the life of Romina Novato, a domestic worker in Singapore.

23 MINAPR 24
Comments
The Bad Economics of Childcare

Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

On this new show from Bloomberg, hosts Mike Regan and Sarah Ponczek speak with expert guests each week about the main themes influencing global markets. They explore everything from stocks to bonds to currencies and commodities, and how each asset class affects trading in the others. Whether you’re a financial professional or just a curious retirement saver, What Goes Up keeps you apprised of the latest buzz on Wall Street and what the wildest movements in markets will mean for your investments.

2 MINAPR 18
Comments
Introducing "What Goes Up," A New Show From Bloomberg

The Pregnant Pause

In this episode, we begin at the beginning: with pregnancy. Women with kids get sidelined at work even before they arrive. From the moment a woman gets pregnant—or reaches the age when she might get pregnant—she's seen as a financial liability. Companies would rather not have to deal with pregnant women at all—and sometimes, they don't. Claire Suddath delves into the history of laws against pregnancy discrimination and explains how they can still fail to protect women. And Jordyn Holman tells the story of Brittany Noble Jones, a TV anchor who says she was pushed out of a job because of her pregnancy.

33 MINAPR 17
Comments
The Pregnant Pause
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