title

The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

426
Followers
1.4K
Plays
The New Yorker: Politics and More
The New Yorker: Politics and More

The New Yorker: Politics and More

WNYC Studios and The New Yorker

426
Followers
1.4K
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

A weekly discussion about politics, hosted by The New Yorker's executive editor, Dorothy Wickenden.

Latest Episodes

Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”

Lena Waithe is the screenwriter and creator of the Showtime series “The Chi,” about the South Side of Chicago, but she tellsJelani Cobb, “Getting your own TV show is like getting beaten to death by your own dream.” Her first script for a feature film is “Queen & Slim,” directed by Melina Matsoukas. It’s about a man and woman who are on a not-great first date, during which theyunintentionallykill a police officer at a traffic stop that escalates. “I just wanted to write something about us. But unfortunately, if I’m writing about us, how can I ignore the fact that we’re being hunted?” The film arrives in the aftermath two notorious police killings of black people—Botham Jean in Dallas and Atatiana Jefferson in Fort Worth—only the latest in a long line of similar tragedies. “I do not want that kind of publicity for my film,” Waithe says. “I am like every other black person. . . . Every time these stories hit our phones, a piece of us dies, because we know that we could be next.”

20 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”

Tricky Dick and Dirty Don: How a Compelling Narrative Can Change the Fate of a Presidency

In 1972, Richard Nixon’s political future seemed assured. He was reëlected byone of the highest popular-vote marginsin American history, his approval rating was near seventy per cent, and the public wasn’t interested in what newspapers were calling the “Watergate Caper.” But the President’s fortunes began to change when new revelations suggested that he knew about the Watergate break-in and that he had participated in a coverup.In May of 1973, the Senate Watergate Committee hearings were broadcast on television, and millions of Americans tuned into watch compelling testimony about Nixon’s illegal activities. A narrative emerged, of Nixon as a scheming crook who put his own interests before those of the country. His poll numbers plummeted, his party turned on him, and, in August of 1974, Nixon resigned from the Presidency in disgrace.Thomas Mallondramatized Nixon’s downfall in his 2012 novel “Watergate.” As Congress again debates the impeachment of a President, Mallon joins...

25 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Tricky Dick and Dirty Don: How a Compelling Narrative Can Change the Fate of a Presidency

The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

Jeff Sessions, then the Attorney General, announced in 2017 the cancellation of the Obama-era policy known as DACA—Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. A number of plaintiffs sued, and their case goes to the Supreme Court next week.The New Yorker’sJonathan Blitzerspoke with two of the attorneys who will argue for it. The noted litigator Ted Olson is generally a champion of conservative issues, but he is fighting the Trump Administration on this case. He told Blitzer, “It’s a rule-of-law case—not a liberal or conversative case—involving hundreds of thousands of individuals who will be hurt by an abrupt and unexplained and unjustified change in policy.” And Blitzer also spoke with Luis Cortez, a thirty-one-year-old from Seattle who is arguing his first Supreme Court case. Cortez is an immigration lawyer who is himself an undocumented immigrant protected by DACA status; if he loses his case, he will be at risk of deportation.

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

How Facebook Continues to Spread Fake News

One of the big stories of the 2016 Presidential campaign was the role Facebook played in spreading false and misleading information, from Russia and from inside the United States, about candidates. The company has made some changes, but it is still under attack from the press, activists, users, and Congress for itsfailure to curbthe proliferation of “fake news” on its platform.Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s co-founder and chief executive, announced this fall that Facebookwill not fact-check political advertisements or other statements made by politicianson the platform.Evan Osnosjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss social media’s power to shape politics and the likely effects on the 2020 Presidential campaign.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How Facebook Continues to Spread Fake News

How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit

One of the almost unsolvable problems with the U.K.’s exit from the E.U. is that it would necessitate a “hard border” between Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., and the Republic of Ireland, which would remain a member nation in Europe. The border was the epicenter of bloody conflict during the decades-long Troubles, and was essentially dismantled during the peace established by the Good Friday Agreement, in 1998. The prospect of fortifying it, with customs-and-immigration checks, has already brought threats of violence from paramilitaries such as the New I.R.A. At the same time, moving the customs border to ports along the coast of Northern Ireland—as the U.K.’s Prime Minister,Boris Johnson, has proposed—strikes Northern Irish loyalists as a step toward unification with the Republic, which they would view as an abandonment by Britain.Patrick Radden Keefe, who wrote about the Troubles in his book “Say Nothing,” discusses the intensely fraught issues of the border wi...

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit

Impeachment Proceedings Go Public, and Republicans Go On the Attack

This week, the House of Representatives voted to move forward with public hearings intowhether President Trump abused his office for political gain. House Republicans unanimously voted against the proceedings, and describe the impeachment process as a conspiracy to unlawfully unseat the President. Trump has called the process an attempted coup.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what to expect from the Intelligence Committee’s televised hearings.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Impeachment Proceedings Go Public, and Republicans Go On the Attack

Sophia Takal’s “Black Christmas,” and the Producer Jason Blum on Horror with a Message

On a sound stage in Brooklyn, Sophia Takal is racing to finish her first feature film, in time for a December release. The film is a remake of “Black Christmas,” an early slasher flick from Canada, in which sorority girls are picked off by a gruesome killer. Horror “takes our everyday anxieties and dread and externalizes them for us,” Takal told WNYC’s Rhiannon Corby, “and allows us to witness a character going through it and usually surviving.” Takal brought a very 2019 sensibility to the remake, reflecting the ongoing struggle of the #MeToo movement. “You can never feel like you’ve beaten misogyny,” she said. “In this movie, the women are never given a rest. They always have to keep fighting.” “Black Christmas” is produced by Jason Blum. Blum found his way to horror films almost by accident: his company, Blumhouse Productions, produced “Paranormal Activity,” which was made for a few thousand dollars and then earned hundreds of millions at the box office. He went on...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Sophia Takal’s “Black Christmas,” and the Producer Jason Blum on Horror with a Message

Elizabeth Warren and the Revolution in Economics

Senator Elizabeth Warren has made a "wealth tax" one of the centerpieces of her presidential campaign. The plan was developed with the help of the economists Emmanuael Saez and Gabriel Zucman, part ofa new generation of economistswhose work focuses on the failures of free markets and advocate what many see as radical social change.John Cassidyjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how this cohort is affecting policy among the Democratic candidates, and whether the economy might help Donald Trump's 2020 re-election bid.

19 MINOCT 25
Comments
Elizabeth Warren and the Revolution in Economics

Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence

Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein and other accused perpetrators of sexual assault helped opened the floodgates of the #MeToo movement. In his new book, “Catch and Kill,” and in “The Black Cube Chronicles” published on newyorker.com, Farrow details the measures that were taken against him and against some of the accusers who went on the record. These included hiring a private spy firm staffed by ex-Mossad officers. Speaking with David Remnick, Farrow lays out a connection between accusations against Harvey Weinstein and NBC’s Matt Lauer. And he interviewed a private investigator named Igor Ostrovskiy who was assigned to spy on him—until he had a crisis of conscience.

22 MINOCT 22
Comments
Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence

Representative Abigail Spanberger and the “National-Security Democrats” Turn the Tide on Impeachment

On September 23rd,Representative Abigail Spanbergerjoined six other House Democrats—all from swing districts and all veterans of the military, defense, and intelligence communities—indrafting an op-ed in theWashingtonPostdeclaringPresident Trumpa threat to the nation. The op-ed signalled a shift in the position of the moderate members of the House Democratic caucus. The day after thePostop-ed ran, the House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, announced a formal impeachment inquiry into Trump. Spanberger joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss divisions within the Party, how Democratic candidates can win in 2020, and the Trump debacles in Ukraine and northern Syria.

19 MINOCT 19
Comments
Representative Abigail Spanberger and the “National-Security Democrats” Turn the Tide on Impeachment

Latest Episodes

Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”

Lena Waithe is the screenwriter and creator of the Showtime series “The Chi,” about the South Side of Chicago, but she tellsJelani Cobb, “Getting your own TV show is like getting beaten to death by your own dream.” Her first script for a feature film is “Queen & Slim,” directed by Melina Matsoukas. It’s about a man and woman who are on a not-great first date, during which theyunintentionallykill a police officer at a traffic stop that escalates. “I just wanted to write something about us. But unfortunately, if I’m writing about us, how can I ignore the fact that we’re being hunted?” The film arrives in the aftermath two notorious police killings of black people—Botham Jean in Dallas and Atatiana Jefferson in Fort Worth—only the latest in a long line of similar tragedies. “I do not want that kind of publicity for my film,” Waithe says. “I am like every other black person. . . . Every time these stories hit our phones, a piece of us dies, because we know that we could be next.”

20 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Lena Waithe on Police Violence and “Queen & Slim”

Tricky Dick and Dirty Don: How a Compelling Narrative Can Change the Fate of a Presidency

In 1972, Richard Nixon’s political future seemed assured. He was reëlected byone of the highest popular-vote marginsin American history, his approval rating was near seventy per cent, and the public wasn’t interested in what newspapers were calling the “Watergate Caper.” But the President’s fortunes began to change when new revelations suggested that he knew about the Watergate break-in and that he had participated in a coverup.In May of 1973, the Senate Watergate Committee hearings were broadcast on television, and millions of Americans tuned into watch compelling testimony about Nixon’s illegal activities. A narrative emerged, of Nixon as a scheming crook who put his own interests before those of the country. His poll numbers plummeted, his party turned on him, and, in August of 1974, Nixon resigned from the Presidency in disgrace.Thomas Mallondramatized Nixon’s downfall in his 2012 novel “Watergate.” As Congress again debates the impeachment of a President, Mallon joins...

25 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Tricky Dick and Dirty Don: How a Compelling Narrative Can Change the Fate of a Presidency

The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

Jeff Sessions, then the Attorney General, announced in 2017 the cancellation of the Obama-era policy known as DACA—Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. A number of plaintiffs sued, and their case goes to the Supreme Court next week.The New Yorker’sJonathan Blitzerspoke with two of the attorneys who will argue for it. The noted litigator Ted Olson is generally a champion of conservative issues, but he is fighting the Trump Administration on this case. He told Blitzer, “It’s a rule-of-law case—not a liberal or conversative case—involving hundreds of thousands of individuals who will be hurt by an abrupt and unexplained and unjustified change in policy.” And Blitzer also spoke with Luis Cortez, a thirty-one-year-old from Seattle who is arguing his first Supreme Court case. Cortez is an immigration lawyer who is himself an undocumented immigrant protected by DACA status; if he loses his case, he will be at risk of deportation.

16 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

How Facebook Continues to Spread Fake News

One of the big stories of the 2016 Presidential campaign was the role Facebook played in spreading false and misleading information, from Russia and from inside the United States, about candidates. The company has made some changes, but it is still under attack from the press, activists, users, and Congress for itsfailure to curbthe proliferation of “fake news” on its platform.Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s co-founder and chief executive, announced this fall that Facebookwill not fact-check political advertisements or other statements made by politicianson the platform.Evan Osnosjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss social media’s power to shape politics and the likely effects on the 2020 Presidential campaign.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How Facebook Continues to Spread Fake News

How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit

One of the almost unsolvable problems with the U.K.’s exit from the E.U. is that it would necessitate a “hard border” between Northern Ireland, which is part of the U.K., and the Republic of Ireland, which would remain a member nation in Europe. The border was the epicenter of bloody conflict during the decades-long Troubles, and was essentially dismantled during the peace established by the Good Friday Agreement, in 1998. The prospect of fortifying it, with customs-and-immigration checks, has already brought threats of violence from paramilitaries such as the New I.R.A. At the same time, moving the customs border to ports along the coast of Northern Ireland—as the U.K.’s Prime Minister,Boris Johnson, has proposed—strikes Northern Irish loyalists as a step toward unification with the Republic, which they would view as an abandonment by Britain.Patrick Radden Keefe, who wrote about the Troubles in his book “Say Nothing,” discusses the intensely fraught issues of the border wi...

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
How the Irish Border Keeps Derailing Brexit

Impeachment Proceedings Go Public, and Republicans Go On the Attack

This week, the House of Representatives voted to move forward with public hearings intowhether President Trump abused his office for political gain. House Republicans unanimously voted against the proceedings, and describe the impeachment process as a conspiracy to unlawfully unseat the President. Trump has called the process an attempted coup.Susan B. Glasserjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss what to expect from the Intelligence Committee’s televised hearings.

20 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Impeachment Proceedings Go Public, and Republicans Go On the Attack

Sophia Takal’s “Black Christmas,” and the Producer Jason Blum on Horror with a Message

On a sound stage in Brooklyn, Sophia Takal is racing to finish her first feature film, in time for a December release. The film is a remake of “Black Christmas,” an early slasher flick from Canada, in which sorority girls are picked off by a gruesome killer. Horror “takes our everyday anxieties and dread and externalizes them for us,” Takal told WNYC’s Rhiannon Corby, “and allows us to witness a character going through it and usually surviving.” Takal brought a very 2019 sensibility to the remake, reflecting the ongoing struggle of the #MeToo movement. “You can never feel like you’ve beaten misogyny,” she said. “In this movie, the women are never given a rest. They always have to keep fighting.” “Black Christmas” is produced by Jason Blum. Blum found his way to horror films almost by accident: his company, Blumhouse Productions, produced “Paranormal Activity,” which was made for a few thousand dollars and then earned hundreds of millions at the box office. He went on...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Sophia Takal’s “Black Christmas,” and the Producer Jason Blum on Horror with a Message

Elizabeth Warren and the Revolution in Economics

Senator Elizabeth Warren has made a "wealth tax" one of the centerpieces of her presidential campaign. The plan was developed with the help of the economists Emmanuael Saez and Gabriel Zucman, part ofa new generation of economistswhose work focuses on the failures of free markets and advocate what many see as radical social change.John Cassidyjoins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss how this cohort is affecting policy among the Democratic candidates, and whether the economy might help Donald Trump's 2020 re-election bid.

19 MINOCT 25
Comments
Elizabeth Warren and the Revolution in Economics

Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence

Farrow’s reporting on Harvey Weinstein and other accused perpetrators of sexual assault helped opened the floodgates of the #MeToo movement. In his new book, “Catch and Kill,” and in “The Black Cube Chronicles” published on newyorker.com, Farrow details the measures that were taken against him and against some of the accusers who went on the record. These included hiring a private spy firm staffed by ex-Mossad officers. Speaking with David Remnick, Farrow lays out a connection between accusations against Harvey Weinstein and NBC’s Matt Lauer. And he interviewed a private investigator named Igor Ostrovskiy who was assigned to spy on him—until he had a crisis of conscience.

22 MINOCT 22
Comments
Ronan Farrow on a Campaign of Silence

Representative Abigail Spanberger and the “National-Security Democrats” Turn the Tide on Impeachment

On September 23rd,Representative Abigail Spanbergerjoined six other House Democrats—all from swing districts and all veterans of the military, defense, and intelligence communities—indrafting an op-ed in theWashingtonPostdeclaringPresident Trumpa threat to the nation. The op-ed signalled a shift in the position of the moderate members of the House Democratic caucus. The day after thePostop-ed ran, the House Speaker, Nancy Pelosi, announced a formal impeachment inquiry into Trump. Spanberger joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss divisions within the Party, how Democratic candidates can win in 2020, and the Trump debacles in Ukraine and northern Syria.

19 MINOCT 19
Comments
Representative Abigail Spanberger and the “National-Security Democrats” Turn the Tide on Impeachment
hmly
himalayaプレミアムへようこそ聴き放題のオーディオブックをお楽しみください。