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Sound & Vision

KEXP

5
Followers
6
Plays
Sound & Vision

Sound & Vision

KEXP

5
Followers
6
Plays
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About Us

The Sound & Vision podcast from KEXP features interviews, panels, reporting and commentary that digs into the stories behind the music, with in-depth discussion of the most important issues facing music and arts communities. New episodes are published on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with bonus features throughout the week. Sound & Vision is hosted by Emily Fox and John Richards.

Latest Episodes

Music Venues Ask for Help Amid COVID-19

Independent music venues say they need help from the government or else they’ll have to close their doors completely. Guest Steven Severin is the co-owner of Neumos in Seattle, and is part of the Washington Nightlife Music Association (WANMA) and the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA). He discusses the state of independent music venues right now and how they are asking folks to get in contact with their congressmembers to pass the RESTART Act to help save venues and other small businesses. Further reading: https://www.saveourstages.com/ https://www.nivassoc.org/ https://wanma.info/ https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/3814 Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Music Venues Ask for Help Amid COVID-19

Aisha Fukushima on The Pandemic and “RAPtivism”

Aisha Fukushima calls herself a RAPtivist.She says the mission ofRAPtivismis to “challenge oppression with expression all around the globe.” About 10 years ago, Fukushima traveled to seven different countries as part of a fellowship program and recorded with musicians along the way. The final product ended up becoming her debut album, RAPtivism. Her latest single is called “Pandemic." Guest host Gabriel Teodros asks Fukushima about the lyric in the song, "this pandemic is systemic." “Me saying that this is systemic is saying that this is connected to income inequality. This is connected to not having universal healthcare. This is connected to the struggles of folks who are doing all sorts of work around ableism. Of course race is huge and racialization in this society and also globally. And a lot of these systems of power and oppression are interconnected and they also affect how this pandemic is being narrated and how it's spreading and/or who it's affecting the most and what kind of support and/or investment is taking place,” Fukushima says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

11 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Aisha Fukushima on The Pandemic and “RAPtivism”

Khruangbin’s Musical Fusion Aims to Unite

Khruangbin’s unique brand of psychedelic funk draws influences from their hometown of Houston, Texas, as well as from around the globe, starting with their appreciation of Thai funk tapes from the 60s. This has helped the band gain popularity with audiences across cultures who can all find elements in their music to relate to. Drummer Donald “DJ” Johnson and bassist Laura Lee discuss how they developed such diverse influences, singing in 16 different languages, and their support for the Black Lives Matter movement. “We see music as a vehicle to highlight those similarities between people so people can stand together, listen to the same music together and experience it,” Laura Lee says. Their third album, Mordechai, is out now on Dead Oceans. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

11 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Khruangbin’s Musical Fusion Aims to Unite

Living Authentically: Reflecting on Jackie Shane's Legacy

Jackie Shane, a Black transgender soul singer, gained prominence in the 1960s with her captivating stage presence and voice. Then, in 1971, she quit her career and faded from the public eye and into a reclusive life at home. New York Times writer Reggie Ugwuwas able to track her down in 2017 and spoke to her on the phone from her home in Nashville. She passed away last year at the age of 78.Ugwu says many people see Jackie Shane as being way ahead of her time, but that she had always put it as “everyone else was behind." When asked about Jackie Shane’s legacy, Ugwu says, “She was someone who was extremely confident and exuded dignity. She never let anyone define her or put her in a box and she never felt that she had to explain herself to anyone. So she was someone who believed deeply in personal liberation and personal freedom and 'live and let live' […] She’s a real model for how you can be yourself and not conform to the pressures of society." Support the show: https://www.k...

10 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Living Authentically: Reflecting on Jackie Shane's Legacy

Gordi on Exploring Queer Identity on Her New Album

Australia’s Gordi is out with a new album, ‘Our Two Skins.' It addresses her queer identity, something she didn't come to terms with until recently. Gordi was supposed to tour the album on a bill with Of Monsters and Men but the tour was cancelled due to COVID-19. Having just wrapped up her medical degree in January, Gordi says she’s on call to put her medical degree to work if COVID-19 cases in Australia start to spike. Gordi also discusses how the Bandcamp proceeds from her song, “Unready," are going to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency. Gordi said putting out music amid worldwide protests over the police murder of George Floyd and others “felt gross” and she felt she needed to do something to support Black lives, including those in Australia. “Australia’s biggest shame is the treatment of our first people by white people,” Gordi says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Gordi on Exploring Queer Identity on Her New Album

Dua Saleh on Queer Black Love and Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Dua Saleh is a non-binary multidisciplinary artist from Minneapolis who released a single this month, “body cast,” in response to the murders of Black people at the hands of police. From their experience fleeing war and genocide in Sudan to the realities of institutional violence in the United States, Saleh expresses that there isn’t a place of safety for Black people. Saleh also discusses their new EP, ‘Rosetta,' named after “the godmother of Rock & Roll,” Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Speaking to the importance of representation, Saleh says, "The inventor and creator of Rock & Roll being a Black, queer woman does a lot for my personal self-esteem." Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

18 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Dua Saleh on Queer Black Love and Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Seattle’s CHOP Fuses Protest With Art

CHOP, or the Capitol Hill Occupied or Organized Protest, formerly known as CHAZ, has been in the headlines lately. On June 8th, Seattle Police officers boarded up the East Precinct on Capitol Hill after more than a week of sustained protests by residents following the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. Since then, a police-free community has spread out to Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park and between Broadway and 12th on Pine. While there were two shootings there over the weekend that left one dead and two injured, the area has been mostly peaceful, with almost a festival vibe to it. There’s art and music amplifying the message that Black Lives Matter. KEXP’s Sharlese Metcalf spent some time at CHOP last week and brought back an audio postcard. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

8 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Seattle’s CHOP Fuses Protest With Art

I Self Devine on Collective Trauma and Community Organizing

I Self Devine is a musician and community organizer from Minneapolis. In 2018 he released a collaborative album called 'Dismembered & Unarmed,’ meant to accompany the book, ‘My Grandmother’s Hands,’ by therapist and trauma specialist Resmaa Menakem. The book and music explore how white supremacy and racism affect Black bodies. “He would tell me things like race very rarely stays in the body. And I just couldn't grasp that concept,” I Self Devine says of Menakem. “He's like, a lot of times we talk about race just from a historical or from a policy place, but not how it lives in the body.” I Self Devine discusses 'Dismembered & Unarmed' as well as his philosophies around community organizing, learning and building off past movements, and doing the internal work. “When it's time for me to transition into the spirit world, I want to be very light, meaning that I've handled all of my issues and I've done my work. What do they say? ‘What happened to you wasn’t your fault, but h...

10 MIN3 w ago
Comments
I Self Devine on Collective Trauma and Community Organizing

Nikkita Oliver on Letting the Vision Lead the Movement

Most people in Seattle knowNikkitaOliver from her historic mayoral run in 2017. She lost the primary election by less than 2,000 votes. But Oliver is also a musician, a poet, an attorney, and the co-director of an incredible organization called Creative Justice, which works with youth most affected by the school-to-prison pipeline. She’s also been an active organizer inSeattle’s protests and advancing the demands to defund and demilitarize the police. A few weeks ago, she participated in a 12,000 person march from Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park to city hall where she then livestreamedwhat was supposed to be a closed door meeting with Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. Oliver laid out demands for the city—defund the police, fund community-based health and safety, and drop all charges against protesters. KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros talks with Oliver about the importance of diversity within a movement, the false narrative of the good protester vs. bad protester, and what’s inspiring her during ...

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Nikkita Oliver on Letting the Vision Lead the Movement

Toki Wright on Minneapolis, Racism and Music

Toki Wright is a musician, MC, producer, writer, radio DJ and community organizer from Minneapolis. He recently moved to Boston and is now chair of Berklee’s Professional Music Department. He’s been making music that addresses systemic racism, oppression and police violence for years. “I don’t sit around all day thinking about race,” Wright says. “I have a lot of things I really love to do. The problem is that race impacts all of them.” Wright tells the stories behind some of his songs that address racism and police violence and discusses how those issues play out in Minneapolis. Wright also talks about the white superiority complex within the Twin Cities’ music scene. “Imagine what it's like standing on stage and looking out into the crowd and not seeing your people there. Your people want to be there, but they feel uncomfortable coming into that room because they're not being represented,” Wright says. “How this all kind of relates to George Floyd and the murdering cop ...

34 MINJUN 16
Comments
Toki Wright on Minneapolis, Racism and Music

Latest Episodes

Music Venues Ask for Help Amid COVID-19

Independent music venues say they need help from the government or else they’ll have to close their doors completely. Guest Steven Severin is the co-owner of Neumos in Seattle, and is part of the Washington Nightlife Music Association (WANMA) and the National Independent Venue Association (NIVA). He discusses the state of independent music venues right now and how they are asking folks to get in contact with their congressmembers to pass the RESTART Act to help save venues and other small businesses. Further reading: https://www.saveourstages.com/ https://www.nivassoc.org/ https://wanma.info/ https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/3814 Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Music Venues Ask for Help Amid COVID-19

Aisha Fukushima on The Pandemic and “RAPtivism”

Aisha Fukushima calls herself a RAPtivist.She says the mission ofRAPtivismis to “challenge oppression with expression all around the globe.” About 10 years ago, Fukushima traveled to seven different countries as part of a fellowship program and recorded with musicians along the way. The final product ended up becoming her debut album, RAPtivism. Her latest single is called “Pandemic." Guest host Gabriel Teodros asks Fukushima about the lyric in the song, "this pandemic is systemic." “Me saying that this is systemic is saying that this is connected to income inequality. This is connected to not having universal healthcare. This is connected to the struggles of folks who are doing all sorts of work around ableism. Of course race is huge and racialization in this society and also globally. And a lot of these systems of power and oppression are interconnected and they also affect how this pandemic is being narrated and how it's spreading and/or who it's affecting the most and what kind of support and/or investment is taking place,” Fukushima says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

11 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Aisha Fukushima on The Pandemic and “RAPtivism”

Khruangbin’s Musical Fusion Aims to Unite

Khruangbin’s unique brand of psychedelic funk draws influences from their hometown of Houston, Texas, as well as from around the globe, starting with their appreciation of Thai funk tapes from the 60s. This has helped the band gain popularity with audiences across cultures who can all find elements in their music to relate to. Drummer Donald “DJ” Johnson and bassist Laura Lee discuss how they developed such diverse influences, singing in 16 different languages, and their support for the Black Lives Matter movement. “We see music as a vehicle to highlight those similarities between people so people can stand together, listen to the same music together and experience it,” Laura Lee says. Their third album, Mordechai, is out now on Dead Oceans. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

11 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Khruangbin’s Musical Fusion Aims to Unite

Living Authentically: Reflecting on Jackie Shane's Legacy

Jackie Shane, a Black transgender soul singer, gained prominence in the 1960s with her captivating stage presence and voice. Then, in 1971, she quit her career and faded from the public eye and into a reclusive life at home. New York Times writer Reggie Ugwuwas able to track her down in 2017 and spoke to her on the phone from her home in Nashville. She passed away last year at the age of 78.Ugwu says many people see Jackie Shane as being way ahead of her time, but that she had always put it as “everyone else was behind." When asked about Jackie Shane’s legacy, Ugwu says, “She was someone who was extremely confident and exuded dignity. She never let anyone define her or put her in a box and she never felt that she had to explain herself to anyone. So she was someone who believed deeply in personal liberation and personal freedom and 'live and let live' […] She’s a real model for how you can be yourself and not conform to the pressures of society." Support the show: https://www.k...

10 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Living Authentically: Reflecting on Jackie Shane's Legacy

Gordi on Exploring Queer Identity on Her New Album

Australia’s Gordi is out with a new album, ‘Our Two Skins.' It addresses her queer identity, something she didn't come to terms with until recently. Gordi was supposed to tour the album on a bill with Of Monsters and Men but the tour was cancelled due to COVID-19. Having just wrapped up her medical degree in January, Gordi says she’s on call to put her medical degree to work if COVID-19 cases in Australia start to spike. Gordi also discusses how the Bandcamp proceeds from her song, “Unready," are going to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency. Gordi said putting out music amid worldwide protests over the police murder of George Floyd and others “felt gross” and she felt she needed to do something to support Black lives, including those in Australia. “Australia’s biggest shame is the treatment of our first people by white people,” Gordi says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Gordi on Exploring Queer Identity on Her New Album

Dua Saleh on Queer Black Love and Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Dua Saleh is a non-binary multidisciplinary artist from Minneapolis who released a single this month, “body cast,” in response to the murders of Black people at the hands of police. From their experience fleeing war and genocide in Sudan to the realities of institutional violence in the United States, Saleh expresses that there isn’t a place of safety for Black people. Saleh also discusses their new EP, ‘Rosetta,' named after “the godmother of Rock & Roll,” Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Speaking to the importance of representation, Saleh says, "The inventor and creator of Rock & Roll being a Black, queer woman does a lot for my personal self-esteem." Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

18 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Dua Saleh on Queer Black Love and Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Seattle’s CHOP Fuses Protest With Art

CHOP, or the Capitol Hill Occupied or Organized Protest, formerly known as CHAZ, has been in the headlines lately. On June 8th, Seattle Police officers boarded up the East Precinct on Capitol Hill after more than a week of sustained protests by residents following the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. Since then, a police-free community has spread out to Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park and between Broadway and 12th on Pine. While there were two shootings there over the weekend that left one dead and two injured, the area has been mostly peaceful, with almost a festival vibe to it. There’s art and music amplifying the message that Black Lives Matter. KEXP’s Sharlese Metcalf spent some time at CHOP last week and brought back an audio postcard. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

8 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Seattle’s CHOP Fuses Protest With Art

I Self Devine on Collective Trauma and Community Organizing

I Self Devine is a musician and community organizer from Minneapolis. In 2018 he released a collaborative album called 'Dismembered & Unarmed,’ meant to accompany the book, ‘My Grandmother’s Hands,’ by therapist and trauma specialist Resmaa Menakem. The book and music explore how white supremacy and racism affect Black bodies. “He would tell me things like race very rarely stays in the body. And I just couldn't grasp that concept,” I Self Devine says of Menakem. “He's like, a lot of times we talk about race just from a historical or from a policy place, but not how it lives in the body.” I Self Devine discusses 'Dismembered & Unarmed' as well as his philosophies around community organizing, learning and building off past movements, and doing the internal work. “When it's time for me to transition into the spirit world, I want to be very light, meaning that I've handled all of my issues and I've done my work. What do they say? ‘What happened to you wasn’t your fault, but h...

10 MIN3 w ago
Comments
I Self Devine on Collective Trauma and Community Organizing

Nikkita Oliver on Letting the Vision Lead the Movement

Most people in Seattle knowNikkitaOliver from her historic mayoral run in 2017. She lost the primary election by less than 2,000 votes. But Oliver is also a musician, a poet, an attorney, and the co-director of an incredible organization called Creative Justice, which works with youth most affected by the school-to-prison pipeline. She’s also been an active organizer inSeattle’s protests and advancing the demands to defund and demilitarize the police. A few weeks ago, she participated in a 12,000 person march from Seattle’s Cal Anderson Park to city hall where she then livestreamedwhat was supposed to be a closed door meeting with Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan. Oliver laid out demands for the city—defund the police, fund community-based health and safety, and drop all charges against protesters. KEXP’s Gabriel Teodros talks with Oliver about the importance of diversity within a movement, the false narrative of the good protester vs. bad protester, and what’s inspiring her during ...

18 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Nikkita Oliver on Letting the Vision Lead the Movement

Toki Wright on Minneapolis, Racism and Music

Toki Wright is a musician, MC, producer, writer, radio DJ and community organizer from Minneapolis. He recently moved to Boston and is now chair of Berklee’s Professional Music Department. He’s been making music that addresses systemic racism, oppression and police violence for years. “I don’t sit around all day thinking about race,” Wright says. “I have a lot of things I really love to do. The problem is that race impacts all of them.” Wright tells the stories behind some of his songs that address racism and police violence and discusses how those issues play out in Minneapolis. Wright also talks about the white superiority complex within the Twin Cities’ music scene. “Imagine what it's like standing on stage and looking out into the crowd and not seeing your people there. Your people want to be there, but they feel uncomfortable coming into that room because they're not being represented,” Wright says. “How this all kind of relates to George Floyd and the murdering cop ...

34 MINJUN 16
Comments
Toki Wright on Minneapolis, Racism and Music
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