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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

JoAnn Fox: Buddhist Teacher

22
Followers
161
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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox

JoAnn Fox: Buddhist Teacher

22
Followers
161
Plays
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About Us

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

Latest Episodes

Episode 91 - An Inner Being

A Buddhist is sometimes referred to as an inner being. This is one who solves their problems and seeks happiness within. In this episode, we look at how to recognize whether we are seeking inner or outer refuge, the difference being whether it can truly solve our problem and give us peace—or not. Yama’s henchmen are standing by. You stand at the door of death With no provisions for the journey. Make an island for yourself. Be quick in making effort. Be wise. Unblemished, with corruption removed, You’ll enter the divine realm of the noble ones. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.62. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 1. Pages 206-208. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Co.

29 min1 w ago
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Episode 91 - An Inner Being

Episode 90 - Free your mind and the rest will follow

According to the Buddha, thoughts create karma, our present reality and our future. Yet our thoughts can be so deceptive. This episode will help us explore and question our thoughts, as well as direct them toward what is beneficial. Specifically, we will look at the three non-virtuous actions of mind: coveting, malice and wrong view. “Coveting: The bases of covetousness are the wealth or possessions of another. The motivation is the desire to make the wealth or property your own. The culmination is thinking “May it become mine,” about wealth and the like. Asaṅga describes this as “the determination that it will become yours.” For this to be full-fledged covetousness, five qualities are required: (1) having a mind that is exceedingly attached to your own resources; (2) having a mind of attachment that wants to accumulate resources; (3) having a mind of longing due to comprehending or experiencing the good things of others—their wealth and so forth; (4) having an envious mind, thinking that whatever is another’s should be your own; (5) having a mind that is overcome, due to covetousness, by shamelessness and an obliviousness about the determination to be free from the faults of covetousness. 2. Malice: Thinking such thoughts as, “How nice it would be if they were killed, or bound, or their resources were ruined, either naturally or by another person.” Moreover, it is complete if the following five attitudes are present. The five are: (1) an attitude of hostility driven by a reifying apprehension of the characteristics of the causes of harm and the phenomena related to them; (2) an impatient attitude by way of not being patient with those doing the harm to you; (3) a resentful attitude based on repeated, improper attention to and mindfulness of the causes of your anger; (4) an envious attitude which thinks, “How nice if my enemy were beaten or killed”; (5) an attitude that is dominated by a lack of shame about your malice and obliviousness about the determination to be free of its faults.” -- Je Tsongkhapa, Great Treatise of the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (see reference below) 3. Wrong Views: Holding tightly to a denial of the existence of an object of wisdom that is very beneficial to us, such as the law of karma. It is not simply having doubts. It is a very closed mind. Karmic results of the 3 non-virtuous actions of mind: covetousness — comes a predominance of attachment malice — comes a predominance of hostility wrong views — comes a predominance of confusion Guard against anger erupting in your mind; Be restrained with your mind. Letting go of mental misconduct Practice good conduct with your mind. The wise are restrained in body, Restrained in speech. The wise are are restrained in mind. They are fully restrained. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.61. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 1. Pages 224-227. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Co.

33 min3 w ago
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Episode 90 - Free your mind and the rest will follow

Episode 89 - Right Speech

Right speech is abstaining from: false speech divisive speech harsh speech frivolous speech Lying (false speech): The performance is indicating something false through speaking, through choosing not to speak, or through gesture. Causing others to engage in the three types of speech—lying, divisive speech, or offensive speech—is the same as doing it yourself. Divisive speech: the motivation is the desire that living beings who are compatible be separated or the desire that living beings who are incompatible remain so. Harsh speech: is saying something unpleasant, which may be either true or false, about someone else. Frivolous speech (idle chatter) speaking about something that is not meaningful. Karmic results that are similar to the cause: from lying—much slander from divisive speech—loss of friendships from offensive speech—hearing unpleasant words from senseless speech—others not listening to your words Guard against anger erupting in your speech; Be restrained with your speech. Letting go of verbal misconduct Practice good conduct with your speech. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment,, Volume 1. Pages 222-236. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor.

33 minSEP 21
Comments
Episode 89 - Right Speech

Episode 88 - Impeccable with your body

Moral discipline is the foundation of the spiritual path in Buddhism. Virtue means something that creates happiness or inner peace (good karma). When we determine that an action is virtuous or non-virtuous, it doesn’t imply judgment or that a person is good or bad, but rather that the action will either bring happiness or suffering in the future. Virtue creates the experience of freedom from guilt, and this helps us continue to develop spiritually through joy and confidence toward inner peace, wisdom, and liberation. Non-virtuous actions of body include killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. These also form the first three of the Pratimoksha Vows, vows taken by lay followers of Buddha (those who are not monks or nuns). Monks and nuns have lots more vows to take! A virtuous life is not a set of rules or a burdensome duty. A virtuous life is a source of happiness, and the sacrifice of non-virtuous pleasures enables us to experience more satisfying ones. The Pratimoksha Vows Refrain from killing Refrain from stealing Refrain from sexual misconduct Refrain from lying Refrain from becoming intoxicated Whether an action is virtuous or non-virtuous depends on a combination of: the mental state, including intention, that the action arises from the effects on those to whom the action is directed the virtues or vices that it expresses and helps to cultivate “Since the self of others is dear to each one, let him who loves himself not harm another” —Buddha Guard against anger erupting in your body; Be restrained with your body. Letting go of bodily misconduct Practice good conduct with your body. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment,, Volume 1. Pages 218-220. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor.

28 minSEP 14
Comments
Episode 88 - Impeccable with your body

Episode 87 - Buddah-Nature

In this episode, we consider our own Buddha-nature, the real nature of our mind: pure, peaceful, wise and compassion. We also learn how to do the practice of taking and giving (or Tonglen in Tibetan) to generate compassion for ourselves and to purify our future self. ‘Monks, this mind is brightly shining, but it is defiled by adventitious defilements’ —Buddha Who is worthy enough to find fault In one who is like a coin of the finest gold— Blameless in conduct, Intelligent, Endowed with insight and virtue, Praised by the wise after being observed day after day? Such a one is praised even by the gods, Even by Brahmā. (229–230 —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60.

23 minSEP 8
Comments
Episode 87 - Buddah-Nature

Episode 86 - Become an Observer

In this episode we explore a method to help us avoid becoming angry when others criticize us or say hurtful things. We can learn to become an observer rather than becoming entangled with others’ actions. Further, we can become an observer of our own thoughts and feelings instead of being controlled by them. If someone says you talk too much it’s not about you, it’s about them. It’s a reflection of the weather inside their mind. If their mind is clear and peaceful like a blue sky, their words and actions reflect that. But if their mind is stormy with anxiety or anger, their words are like the lightning and thunder—they aren’t about you. Ancient is this [saying], O Atula, It is not just of today: They find fault in one sitting silently, They find fault in one speaking much, They find fault in one speaking moderately. No one in this world is not found at fault. (227)* No person can be found Who has been, is, or will be Only criticized Or only praised. (228) —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 165-166.

27 minAUG 31
Comments
Episode 86 - Become an Observer

Episode 85 - Compassion For Those Who Harm Us

In this episode we look at a practice to help us generate compassion for those who harm us. This can free us from the painful experience of anger. The method given in this episode is called taking and giving. It is a highly effective practice for overcoming many types of anger, including resentment and guilt. Analyzing your commitment “I committed myself to achieving the benefit and happiness of all living beings when I generated the spirit of enlightenment. I act for others’ welfare and care for all beings.” Showing that compassion is appropriate Contemplate from the depths of your heart, “All living beings have been in cyclic existence since beginningless time, and there is not one who has not been my friend and relative—father, mother, etc. Being impermanent, they lose their lives and are miserable due to the three types of suffering. Crazed by the demon of the afflictions, they destroy their own welfare in this and future lives. [411] I must generate compassion for them. How could it be right to get angry or to retaliate for harm?” —Je Tsongkhapa For the ever-wakeful— Training day and night, Intent on Nirvana— The toxins disappear. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 165-166.

31 minAUG 17
Comments
Episode 85 - Compassion For Those Who Harm Us

Episode 84 - Cooling The Fires of Anger

The Buddhist canon contains many methods to calm the fires of anger and increase our patience. In this episode we look at a method for averting anger by understanding that harm is created by the power of our own karma. The suffering generated by harm is the effect of previous bad karma; by experiencing it, we exhaust this karma. We can even view them as kind because it is as though they are engaged in actions for the sake of clearing away our own bad karma. “The experience of suffering produced by those who harm occurs from concordant causes; that is to say, from non-virtuous actions we have done in the past.” —Je Tsongkhapa Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds states: “I, at a former time, inflicted Harm such as this on living beings.” —Shantideva “If, blinded by craving, I have obtained This abscess with a human form, So painful that it cannot bear to be touched, With whom should I be angry when it is hurt?” —Shantideva If one speaks the truth, Is not angry, And gives when asked, even when one has little, Then one comes into the presence of the gods. Sages who do no harm, Constantly restrained in body, Go to the immovable state Where they do not grieve. (225)* —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 163-164..

31 minAUG 3
Comments
Episode 84 - Cooling The Fires of Anger

Episode 83 - The Ability To Remain Calm

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines patience as: the ability to remain calm when dealing with a difficult or annoying situation, task, or person. Everyone has different triggers that cause them to become upset, annoyed or furious, but, like any ability we possess, the capacity to remain calm can be cultivated with practice. This episode is part of a series on patience as we explore the chapter called “Anger” in the Dhammapada, a collection of the teachings Buddha gave as he walked from town to town 2,500 years ago. Conquer anger with non-anger; Conquer wickedness with goodness; Conquer stinginess with goodness And a liar with the truth. (Verse 223) —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.59. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 160-163.

40 minJUL 4
Comments
Episode 83 - The Ability To Remain Calm

Episode 82 - The Faults of Anger

The faults of anger: We become unhappy and uncomfortable Makes us lose our reason and good sense Destroys relationships Karmic cause of future ugliness and makes us appear unattractive in the moment Destroys good karma The section on the divisions of patience has three parts: Developing the patience of disregarding harm done to you Developing the patience of accepting suffering Developing the patience of certitude about the teachings Two ways to give up anger and disregard harm done to you See that that anger is unjustified Feel that compassion is appropriate The one who keeps anger in check as it arises As one would a careening chariot, I call a charioteer. Others are merely rein-holders. (Verse 222) —Buddha, The Dhammapada

37 minJUN 29
Comments
Episode 82 - The Faults of Anger

Latest Episodes

Episode 91 - An Inner Being

A Buddhist is sometimes referred to as an inner being. This is one who solves their problems and seeks happiness within. In this episode, we look at how to recognize whether we are seeking inner or outer refuge, the difference being whether it can truly solve our problem and give us peace—or not. Yama’s henchmen are standing by. You stand at the door of death With no provisions for the journey. Make an island for yourself. Be quick in making effort. Be wise. Unblemished, with corruption removed, You’ll enter the divine realm of the noble ones. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.62. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 1. Pages 206-208. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Co.

29 min1 w ago
Comments
Episode 91 - An Inner Being

Episode 90 - Free your mind and the rest will follow

According to the Buddha, thoughts create karma, our present reality and our future. Yet our thoughts can be so deceptive. This episode will help us explore and question our thoughts, as well as direct them toward what is beneficial. Specifically, we will look at the three non-virtuous actions of mind: coveting, malice and wrong view. “Coveting: The bases of covetousness are the wealth or possessions of another. The motivation is the desire to make the wealth or property your own. The culmination is thinking “May it become mine,” about wealth and the like. Asaṅga describes this as “the determination that it will become yours.” For this to be full-fledged covetousness, five qualities are required: (1) having a mind that is exceedingly attached to your own resources; (2) having a mind of attachment that wants to accumulate resources; (3) having a mind of longing due to comprehending or experiencing the good things of others—their wealth and so forth; (4) having an envious mind, thinking that whatever is another’s should be your own; (5) having a mind that is overcome, due to covetousness, by shamelessness and an obliviousness about the determination to be free from the faults of covetousness. 2. Malice: Thinking such thoughts as, “How nice it would be if they were killed, or bound, or their resources were ruined, either naturally or by another person.” Moreover, it is complete if the following five attitudes are present. The five are: (1) an attitude of hostility driven by a reifying apprehension of the characteristics of the causes of harm and the phenomena related to them; (2) an impatient attitude by way of not being patient with those doing the harm to you; (3) a resentful attitude based on repeated, improper attention to and mindfulness of the causes of your anger; (4) an envious attitude which thinks, “How nice if my enemy were beaten or killed”; (5) an attitude that is dominated by a lack of shame about your malice and obliviousness about the determination to be free of its faults.” -- Je Tsongkhapa, Great Treatise of the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (see reference below) 3. Wrong Views: Holding tightly to a denial of the existence of an object of wisdom that is very beneficial to us, such as the law of karma. It is not simply having doubts. It is a very closed mind. Karmic results of the 3 non-virtuous actions of mind: covetousness — comes a predominance of attachment malice — comes a predominance of hostility wrong views — comes a predominance of confusion Guard against anger erupting in your mind; Be restrained with your mind. Letting go of mental misconduct Practice good conduct with your mind. The wise are restrained in body, Restrained in speech. The wise are are restrained in mind. They are fully restrained. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.61. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, Volume 1. Pages 224-227. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Co.

33 min3 w ago
Comments
Episode 90 - Free your mind and the rest will follow

Episode 89 - Right Speech

Right speech is abstaining from: false speech divisive speech harsh speech frivolous speech Lying (false speech): The performance is indicating something false through speaking, through choosing not to speak, or through gesture. Causing others to engage in the three types of speech—lying, divisive speech, or offensive speech—is the same as doing it yourself. Divisive speech: the motivation is the desire that living beings who are compatible be separated or the desire that living beings who are incompatible remain so. Harsh speech: is saying something unpleasant, which may be either true or false, about someone else. Frivolous speech (idle chatter) speaking about something that is not meaningful. Karmic results that are similar to the cause: from lying—much slander from divisive speech—loss of friendships from offensive speech—hearing unpleasant words from senseless speech—others not listening to your words Guard against anger erupting in your speech; Be restrained with your speech. Letting go of verbal misconduct Practice good conduct with your speech. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment,, Volume 1. Pages 222-236. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor.

33 minSEP 21
Comments
Episode 89 - Right Speech

Episode 88 - Impeccable with your body

Moral discipline is the foundation of the spiritual path in Buddhism. Virtue means something that creates happiness or inner peace (good karma). When we determine that an action is virtuous or non-virtuous, it doesn’t imply judgment or that a person is good or bad, but rather that the action will either bring happiness or suffering in the future. Virtue creates the experience of freedom from guilt, and this helps us continue to develop spiritually through joy and confidence toward inner peace, wisdom, and liberation. Non-virtuous actions of body include killing, stealing and sexual misconduct. These also form the first three of the Pratimoksha Vows, vows taken by lay followers of Buddha (those who are not monks or nuns). Monks and nuns have lots more vows to take! A virtuous life is not a set of rules or a burdensome duty. A virtuous life is a source of happiness, and the sacrifice of non-virtuous pleasures enables us to experience more satisfying ones. The Pratimoksha Vows Refrain from killing Refrain from stealing Refrain from sexual misconduct Refrain from lying Refrain from becoming intoxicated Whether an action is virtuous or non-virtuous depends on a combination of: the mental state, including intention, that the action arises from the effects on those to whom the action is directed the virtues or vices that it expresses and helps to cultivate “Since the self of others is dear to each one, let him who loves himself not harm another” —Buddha Guard against anger erupting in your body; Be restrained with your body. Letting go of bodily misconduct Practice good conduct with your body. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment,, Volume 1. Pages 218-220. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor.

28 minSEP 14
Comments
Episode 88 - Impeccable with your body

Episode 87 - Buddah-Nature

In this episode, we consider our own Buddha-nature, the real nature of our mind: pure, peaceful, wise and compassion. We also learn how to do the practice of taking and giving (or Tonglen in Tibetan) to generate compassion for ourselves and to purify our future self. ‘Monks, this mind is brightly shining, but it is defiled by adventitious defilements’ —Buddha Who is worthy enough to find fault In one who is like a coin of the finest gold— Blameless in conduct, Intelligent, Endowed with insight and virtue, Praised by the wise after being observed day after day? Such a one is praised even by the gods, Even by Brahmā. (229–230 —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60.

23 minSEP 8
Comments
Episode 87 - Buddah-Nature

Episode 86 - Become an Observer

In this episode we explore a method to help us avoid becoming angry when others criticize us or say hurtful things. We can learn to become an observer rather than becoming entangled with others’ actions. Further, we can become an observer of our own thoughts and feelings instead of being controlled by them. If someone says you talk too much it’s not about you, it’s about them. It’s a reflection of the weather inside their mind. If their mind is clear and peaceful like a blue sky, their words and actions reflect that. But if their mind is stormy with anxiety or anger, their words are like the lightning and thunder—they aren’t about you. Ancient is this [saying], O Atula, It is not just of today: They find fault in one sitting silently, They find fault in one speaking much, They find fault in one speaking moderately. No one in this world is not found at fault. (227)* No person can be found Who has been, is, or will be Only criticized Or only praised. (228) —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 165-166.

27 minAUG 31
Comments
Episode 86 - Become an Observer

Episode 85 - Compassion For Those Who Harm Us

In this episode we look at a practice to help us generate compassion for those who harm us. This can free us from the painful experience of anger. The method given in this episode is called taking and giving. It is a highly effective practice for overcoming many types of anger, including resentment and guilt. Analyzing your commitment “I committed myself to achieving the benefit and happiness of all living beings when I generated the spirit of enlightenment. I act for others’ welfare and care for all beings.” Showing that compassion is appropriate Contemplate from the depths of your heart, “All living beings have been in cyclic existence since beginningless time, and there is not one who has not been my friend and relative—father, mother, etc. Being impermanent, they lose their lives and are miserable due to the three types of suffering. Crazed by the demon of the afflictions, they destroy their own welfare in this and future lives. [411] I must generate compassion for them. How could it be right to get angry or to retaliate for harm?” —Je Tsongkhapa For the ever-wakeful— Training day and night, Intent on Nirvana— The toxins disappear. —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 165-166.

31 minAUG 17
Comments
Episode 85 - Compassion For Those Who Harm Us

Episode 84 - Cooling The Fires of Anger

The Buddhist canon contains many methods to calm the fires of anger and increase our patience. In this episode we look at a method for averting anger by understanding that harm is created by the power of our own karma. The suffering generated by harm is the effect of previous bad karma; by experiencing it, we exhaust this karma. We can even view them as kind because it is as though they are engaged in actions for the sake of clearing away our own bad karma. “The experience of suffering produced by those who harm occurs from concordant causes; that is to say, from non-virtuous actions we have done in the past.” —Je Tsongkhapa Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds states: “I, at a former time, inflicted Harm such as this on living beings.” —Shantideva “If, blinded by craving, I have obtained This abscess with a human form, So painful that it cannot bear to be touched, With whom should I be angry when it is hurt?” —Shantideva If one speaks the truth, Is not angry, And gives when asked, even when one has little, Then one comes into the presence of the gods. Sages who do no harm, Constantly restrained in body, Go to the immovable state Where they do not grieve. (225)* —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.60. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 163-164..

31 minAUG 3
Comments
Episode 84 - Cooling The Fires of Anger

Episode 83 - The Ability To Remain Calm

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines patience as: the ability to remain calm when dealing with a difficult or annoying situation, task, or person. Everyone has different triggers that cause them to become upset, annoyed or furious, but, like any ability we possess, the capacity to remain calm can be cultivated with practice. This episode is part of a series on patience as we explore the chapter called “Anger” in the Dhammapada, a collection of the teachings Buddha gave as he walked from town to town 2,500 years ago. Conquer anger with non-anger; Conquer wickedness with goodness; Conquer stinginess with goodness And a liar with the truth. (Verse 223) —Buddha, The Dhammapada Links and References Buddha.The Dhammapada. Translated by Gil Fronsdale. Shambala, Boston and London, 2011, pp.59. Je Tsongkhapa. Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment, by Je Tsongkhapa, Volume 2. Translated by the Lamrim Chenmo Translation Committee. Joshua Cutler, Editor-in-Chief, and Guy Newlan, Editor, pp 160-163.

40 minJUL 4
Comments
Episode 83 - The Ability To Remain Calm

Episode 82 - The Faults of Anger

The faults of anger: We become unhappy and uncomfortable Makes us lose our reason and good sense Destroys relationships Karmic cause of future ugliness and makes us appear unattractive in the moment Destroys good karma The section on the divisions of patience has three parts: Developing the patience of disregarding harm done to you Developing the patience of accepting suffering Developing the patience of certitude about the teachings Two ways to give up anger and disregard harm done to you See that that anger is unjustified Feel that compassion is appropriate The one who keeps anger in check as it arises As one would a careening chariot, I call a charioteer. Others are merely rein-holders. (Verse 222) —Buddha, The Dhammapada

37 minJUN 29
Comments
Episode 82 - The Faults of Anger
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