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Business Daily

BBC World Service

2.2K
Followers
9.8K
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Business Daily

Business Daily

BBC World Service

2.2K
Followers
9.8K
Plays
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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Latest Episodes

Why do we ignore catastrophic risk?

Covid-19 is showing up a general failure by most of the world's governments to prepare for the worst. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Dr Sylvie Briand at the World Health Organization, whose job is to get the world ready for new infectious outbreaks like coronavirus. What was it like for her exhortations to fall on deaf ears up until this year? How prepared was the WHO itself, and does she fear the consequences if the multilateral organisation is defunded? Meanwhile, author and risk consultant David Ropeik explains why human nature makes us so bad at taking action to ward of disasters that happen once in a blue moon. And Jens Orback, head of the Global Challenges Foundation, says pandemics are only one of a host of terrifying cataclysms that we disregard at our peril. (Picture: Asteroid striking the Earth; Credit: puchan/Getty Images)

18 MIN11 h ago
Comments
Why do we ignore catastrophic risk?

Business Weekly

On Business Weekly, we look at what's been the biggest corporate scandal of 2020 so far. Wirecard was one of the German stock exchange's largest companies, but it now finds itself embroiled in fraud and corruption claims. How did the technology star fall so quickly from grace? Fergus Nicoll investigates. The coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on the education sector and in the United States new rules say foreign students might face deportation if their courses have gone online, throwing their lives into disarray, Rob Young hears their stories. And what’s the formula behind a winning brand? We join Elizabeth Hotson on a quest to bring out a winning range of mushy peas. Presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma and produced by Matthew Davies.

49 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Trump's tax returns

The US Supreme Court has ruled that the US President's taxes cannot be withheld from a grand jury investigation - but what does it mean for his bid to keep his finances private and to get himself re-elected in November? Ed Butler asks John Coffee, professor of law at New York's Columbia Law school, which legal team and which political party should be celebrating more over this complicated ruling. Plus, New York Times investigative journalist Susanne Craig tells us what is already known about Mr Trump's tax affairs and the source of his wealth. And tax journalist David Cay Johnston explains why Mr Trump's finances were so little investigated before he became president. (Picture: US President Donald Trump in the cabinet room of the White House; Credit: EPA/Samuel Corum)

18 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Trump's tax returns

Voting amidst a pandemic

Could electronic voting help the US hold an election? Ed Butler speaks to Nimit Sawhney founder and CEO of Voatz - a US startup that provides voting through a smartphone app, and to Priit Vinkel, the former head of the state electoral office of Estonia where 50% of citizens now cast their votes online. J. Alex Halderman, professor of computer science at the University of Michigan explains why e-voting systems are so risky when it comes to election security. Lori Steele Contorer, former founder and CEO of e-voting company Everyone Counts, argues the case for electronic voting amid the coronavirus pandemic. Producer: Edwin Lane (Photo: Voters line up at polling stations in the US state of Wisconsin earlier this year; Credit: Getty Images)

18 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Voting amidst a pandemic

Rising tensions with China

Why does China seem to be upsetting countries around the world? Beijing's recent clampdown on Hong Kong with a new security law has led many countries to condemn the Chinese leadership. It's also put more pressure on the trade war with the US. So what's in it for Beijing to apparently spur international hostility over Hong Kong and a number of other regional border conflicts? George Magnus, an economist and an associate at the China Centre at Oxford University, believes the domestic unemployment issue is a big determining factor in Beijing's thinking. Yuen Yuen Ang, a political scientist and an expert on China and emerging economies at the University of Michigan, says it's all a symptom of President Xi's and Donald Trump's insecurities at home. And Ian Bremmer the President of the risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, says despite the Chinese always having been thought of long term, strategic thinkers they are now not even thinking six months ahead. (Picture: Cargo containers with US ...

18 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Rising tensions with China

How brands are born

What's the secret to coming up with a brand name? Elizabeth Hotson goes on a mission to create a new line of mushy peas - also known as Yorkshire caviar. With their low fat, high fibre, vegan credentials, mushy peas should be a winner with health conscious millennials, but a great name is still essential to success. We negotiate legal minefields with Kate Swaine, head of the UK trademarks, brands and designs team at law firm Gowling WLG, and get some valuable branding insights from Simon Manchipp and Laura Hussey at design agency SomeOne. Eric Yorkston, associate professor of marketing at the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University, tells us why analysing the sounds of words can make or break a brand. Producer: Sarah Treanor (Picture: Queen Pea branding by Simon Manchipp of SomeOne)

17 MIN6 d ago
Comments
How brands are born

Africa's tech entrepreneurs

Coronavirus has brought new opportunities to Africa's tech sector, despite the devastating blow it has delivered to economies around the world. Tamasin Ford speaks to one of Forbes Africa’s 50 most powerful women, Rebecca Enonchong, the founder and CEO of AppsTech, a global provider of digital solutions. Claud Hutchful, chief executive of Dream Oval, a technology firm in Accra, Ghana, tells us about payments app Slydepay. Plus we hear from Moses Acquah, chief technology officer of GreenTec Capital Partners, an investment firm that supports African entrepreneurs. He’s also the founder of the networking organisation, Afrolynk. (Picture: Woman using a tablet; Credit: Getty Images)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Africa's tech entrepreneurs

Business Weekly

Big brands are turning away from Facebook over its so-called toxic content - so how will the social network cope? That’s the big question we’ll be asking on Business Weekly. We’ll also be investigating the changing face of make-up as Kim Kardashian West sells a stake in her cosmetics business to the beauty giant Coty. We’ll hear why traditional make-up brands are struggling to keep up with companies born in the age of social media and influencers. Our correspondent in France heads to the sparkling shores of Brittany to see whether businesses there are ready for summer tourists - and we have an interview with the film director, Gurinder Chadha. Presented by Lucy Burton.

49 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Nollywood under lockdown

Coronavirus has brought one of the most prolific film industries to a virtual standstill. Nollywood, Nigeria’s film industry, is the third largest in the world after Hollywood and India’s Bollywood. Chijioke Uwaegbute from the entertainment desk at Price Waterhouse Coopers Nigeria explains the financial impact of the virus on Nollywood. Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse, the biggest cinema chain in West Africa, says that with all his cinemas closed, he’s having to pay furlough money out of his own pocket. Plus actress and screenwriter Alexendra Amon tells us that she has had projects cancelled. And we’ll also hear from Obi Emelonye on using smartphones to overcome restriction during the pandemic. (Image: Nollywood films at a market in Lagos. Picture credit: CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP via Getty Images)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Nollywood under lockdown

US states resist second lockdown

Coronavirus cases have been rising in two dozen states over the last 14 days. Of these, Texas, Florida, Arizona and California have emerged as the country's latest virus epicentres. And yet governors in many of these states are resisting efforts to close down economic and social activity, or a “second lockdown". Republican strategist Chris Ingram in Tampa, Florida, explains to Business Daily's Ed Butler the thinking behind allowing most Americans, apart from the most vulnerable, to get back to normal life. But some Floridians are not waiting for directions from the government. Ed Boas, owner of Lanes clothing store, describes the precautions he’s taking on his own initiative. Meanwhile Dr Cheryl Holder, at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, says that while the state is better-equipped to deal with a second wave, she’s concerned many young people think themselves invulnerable. And Wendell Potter, former health insurance broker turned whis...

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
US states resist second lockdown

Latest Episodes

Why do we ignore catastrophic risk?

Covid-19 is showing up a general failure by most of the world's governments to prepare for the worst. Manuela Saragosa speaks to Dr Sylvie Briand at the World Health Organization, whose job is to get the world ready for new infectious outbreaks like coronavirus. What was it like for her exhortations to fall on deaf ears up until this year? How prepared was the WHO itself, and does she fear the consequences if the multilateral organisation is defunded? Meanwhile, author and risk consultant David Ropeik explains why human nature makes us so bad at taking action to ward of disasters that happen once in a blue moon. And Jens Orback, head of the Global Challenges Foundation, says pandemics are only one of a host of terrifying cataclysms that we disregard at our peril. (Picture: Asteroid striking the Earth; Credit: puchan/Getty Images)

18 MIN11 h ago
Comments
Why do we ignore catastrophic risk?

Business Weekly

On Business Weekly, we look at what's been the biggest corporate scandal of 2020 so far. Wirecard was one of the German stock exchange's largest companies, but it now finds itself embroiled in fraud and corruption claims. How did the technology star fall so quickly from grace? Fergus Nicoll investigates. The coronavirus pandemic has taken its toll on the education sector and in the United States new rules say foreign students might face deportation if their courses have gone online, throwing their lives into disarray, Rob Young hears their stories. And what’s the formula behind a winning brand? We join Elizabeth Hotson on a quest to bring out a winning range of mushy peas. Presented by Vishala Sri-Pathma and produced by Matthew Davies.

49 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Trump's tax returns

The US Supreme Court has ruled that the US President's taxes cannot be withheld from a grand jury investigation - but what does it mean for his bid to keep his finances private and to get himself re-elected in November? Ed Butler asks John Coffee, professor of law at New York's Columbia Law school, which legal team and which political party should be celebrating more over this complicated ruling. Plus, New York Times investigative journalist Susanne Craig tells us what is already known about Mr Trump's tax affairs and the source of his wealth. And tax journalist David Cay Johnston explains why Mr Trump's finances were so little investigated before he became president. (Picture: US President Donald Trump in the cabinet room of the White House; Credit: EPA/Samuel Corum)

18 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Trump's tax returns

Voting amidst a pandemic

Could electronic voting help the US hold an election? Ed Butler speaks to Nimit Sawhney founder and CEO of Voatz - a US startup that provides voting through a smartphone app, and to Priit Vinkel, the former head of the state electoral office of Estonia where 50% of citizens now cast their votes online. J. Alex Halderman, professor of computer science at the University of Michigan explains why e-voting systems are so risky when it comes to election security. Lori Steele Contorer, former founder and CEO of e-voting company Everyone Counts, argues the case for electronic voting amid the coronavirus pandemic. Producer: Edwin Lane (Photo: Voters line up at polling stations in the US state of Wisconsin earlier this year; Credit: Getty Images)

18 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Voting amidst a pandemic

Rising tensions with China

Why does China seem to be upsetting countries around the world? Beijing's recent clampdown on Hong Kong with a new security law has led many countries to condemn the Chinese leadership. It's also put more pressure on the trade war with the US. So what's in it for Beijing to apparently spur international hostility over Hong Kong and a number of other regional border conflicts? George Magnus, an economist and an associate at the China Centre at Oxford University, believes the domestic unemployment issue is a big determining factor in Beijing's thinking. Yuen Yuen Ang, a political scientist and an expert on China and emerging economies at the University of Michigan, says it's all a symptom of President Xi's and Donald Trump's insecurities at home. And Ian Bremmer the President of the risk consultancy the Eurasia Group, says despite the Chinese always having been thought of long term, strategic thinkers they are now not even thinking six months ahead. (Picture: Cargo containers with US ...

18 MIN5 d ago
Comments
Rising tensions with China

How brands are born

What's the secret to coming up with a brand name? Elizabeth Hotson goes on a mission to create a new line of mushy peas - also known as Yorkshire caviar. With their low fat, high fibre, vegan credentials, mushy peas should be a winner with health conscious millennials, but a great name is still essential to success. We negotiate legal minefields with Kate Swaine, head of the UK trademarks, brands and designs team at law firm Gowling WLG, and get some valuable branding insights from Simon Manchipp and Laura Hussey at design agency SomeOne. Eric Yorkston, associate professor of marketing at the Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University, tells us why analysing the sounds of words can make or break a brand. Producer: Sarah Treanor (Picture: Queen Pea branding by Simon Manchipp of SomeOne)

17 MIN6 d ago
Comments
How brands are born

Africa's tech entrepreneurs

Coronavirus has brought new opportunities to Africa's tech sector, despite the devastating blow it has delivered to economies around the world. Tamasin Ford speaks to one of Forbes Africa’s 50 most powerful women, Rebecca Enonchong, the founder and CEO of AppsTech, a global provider of digital solutions. Claud Hutchful, chief executive of Dream Oval, a technology firm in Accra, Ghana, tells us about payments app Slydepay. Plus we hear from Moses Acquah, chief technology officer of GreenTec Capital Partners, an investment firm that supports African entrepreneurs. He’s also the founder of the networking organisation, Afrolynk. (Picture: Woman using a tablet; Credit: Getty Images)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Africa's tech entrepreneurs

Business Weekly

Big brands are turning away from Facebook over its so-called toxic content - so how will the social network cope? That’s the big question we’ll be asking on Business Weekly. We’ll also be investigating the changing face of make-up as Kim Kardashian West sells a stake in her cosmetics business to the beauty giant Coty. We’ll hear why traditional make-up brands are struggling to keep up with companies born in the age of social media and influencers. Our correspondent in France heads to the sparkling shores of Brittany to see whether businesses there are ready for summer tourists - and we have an interview with the film director, Gurinder Chadha. Presented by Lucy Burton.

49 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Business Weekly

Nollywood under lockdown

Coronavirus has brought one of the most prolific film industries to a virtual standstill. Nollywood, Nigeria’s film industry, is the third largest in the world after Hollywood and India’s Bollywood. Chijioke Uwaegbute from the entertainment desk at Price Waterhouse Coopers Nigeria explains the financial impact of the virus on Nollywood. Moses Babatope, co-founder of Filmhouse, the biggest cinema chain in West Africa, says that with all his cinemas closed, he’s having to pay furlough money out of his own pocket. Plus actress and screenwriter Alexendra Amon tells us that she has had projects cancelled. And we’ll also hear from Obi Emelonye on using smartphones to overcome restriction during the pandemic. (Image: Nollywood films at a market in Lagos. Picture credit: CRISTINA ALDEHUELA/AFP via Getty Images)

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Nollywood under lockdown

US states resist second lockdown

Coronavirus cases have been rising in two dozen states over the last 14 days. Of these, Texas, Florida, Arizona and California have emerged as the country's latest virus epicentres. And yet governors in many of these states are resisting efforts to close down economic and social activity, or a “second lockdown". Republican strategist Chris Ingram in Tampa, Florida, explains to Business Daily's Ed Butler the thinking behind allowing most Americans, apart from the most vulnerable, to get back to normal life. But some Floridians are not waiting for directions from the government. Ed Boas, owner of Lanes clothing store, describes the precautions he’s taking on his own initiative. Meanwhile Dr Cheryl Holder, at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, says that while the state is better-equipped to deal with a second wave, she’s concerned many young people think themselves invulnerable. And Wendell Potter, former health insurance broker turned whis...

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
US states resist second lockdown
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