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TED Talks Business

TED

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TED Talks Business

TED Talks Business

TED

2.1K
Followers
4.1K
Plays
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About Us

Some of the world's greatest innovators, entrepreneurs, and business researchers share their stories and insights from the stage at TED conferences, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos for free from TED.com that features interactive English transcript, and subtitles in as many as 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.

Latest Episodes

The rapid growth of the Chinese internet -- and where it's headed | Gary Liu

The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace -- it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed -- from the innovative, like AI-optimized train travel, to the dystopian, like a social credit rating that both rewards and restricts citizens.

12 MIN2018 JUL 9
Comments
The rapid growth of the Chinese internet -- and where it's headed | Gary Liu

How Netflix changed entertainment -- and where it's headed | Chris Anderson

Netflix changed the world of entertainment -- first with DVD-by-mail, then with streaming media and then again with sensational original shows like "Orange Is the New Black" and "Stranger Things" -- but not without taking its fair share of risks. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings discusses the company's bold internal culture, the powerful algorithm that fuels their recommendations, the $8 billion worth of content they're investing in this year and his philanthropic pursuits supporting innovative education, among much more.

20 MIN2018 JUN 21
Comments
How Netflix changed entertainment -- and where it's headed | Chris Anderson

Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John Doerr

Our leaders and institutions are failing us, but it's not always because they're bad or unethical, says venture capitalist John Doerr -- often, it's simply because they're leading us toward the wrong objectives. In this practical talk, Doerr shows us how we can get back on track with "Objectives and Key Results," or OKRs -- a goal-setting system that's been employed by the likes of Google, Intel and Bono to set and execute on audacious goals. Learn more about how setting the right goals can mean the difference between success and failure -- and how we can use OKRs to hold our leaders and ourselves accountable.

11 MIN2018 JUN 11
Comments
Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John Doerr

How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy Edmondson

Business school professor Amy Edmondson studies "teaming," where people come together quickly (and often temporarily) to solve new, urgent or unusual problems. Recalling stories of teamwork on the fly, such as the incredible rescue of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground in Chile in 2010, Edmondson shares the elements needed to turn a group of strangers into a quick-thinking team that can nimbly respond to challenges.

13 MIN2018 MAY 24
Comments
How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy Edmondson

The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert Neuwirth

From rides to homes and beyond, we're sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it's been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples -- like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water -- and says that if we can propagate and scale these models, they could help communities thrive from the bottom up.

9 MIN2018 MAY 17
Comments
The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert Neuwirth

A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate Raworth

What would a sustainable, universally beneficial economy look like? "Like a doughnut," says Oxford economist Kate Raworth. In a stellar, eye-opening talk, she explains how we can move countries out of the hole -- where people are falling short on life's essentials -- and create regenerative, distributive economies that work within the planet's ecological limits.

15 MIN2018 MAY 14
Comments
A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate Raworth

My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it | Drew Philp

In 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn't just learn how to repair a house -- he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about "radical neighborliness" and makes the case that we have "the power to create the world anew together and to do it ourselves when our governments refuse."

13 MIN2018 APR 4
Comments
My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it | Drew Philp

Need a new idea? Start at the edge of what is known | Vittorio Loreto

"Where do great ideas come from?" Starting with this question in mind, Vittorio Loreto takes us on a journey to explore a possible mathematical scheme that explains the birth of the new. Learn more about the "adjacent possible" -- the crossroads of what's actual and what's possible -- and how studying the math that drives it could explain how we create new ideas.

16 MIN2018 MAR 22
Comments
Need a new idea? Start at the edge of what is known | Vittorio Loreto

To solve the world's biggest problems, invest in women and girls | Musimbi Kanyoro

As CEO of the Global Fund for Women, Musimbi Kanyoro works to support women and their ideas so they can expand and grow. She introduces us to the Maragoli concept of "isirika" -- a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another -- something she sees women practicing all over the world. And she calls for those who have more to give more to people working to improve their communities. "Imagine what it would look like if you embraced isirika and made it your default," Kanyoro says. "What could we achieve for each other? For humanity?" Let's find out -- together.

14 MIN2018 MAR 8
Comments
To solve the world's biggest problems, invest in women and girls | Musimbi Kanyoro

Do you really know why you do what you do? | Petter Johansson

Experimental psychologist Petter Johansson researches choice blindness -- a phenomenon where we convince ourselves that we're getting what we want, even when we're not. In an eye-opening talk, he shares experiments (designed in collaboration with magicians!) that aim to answer the question: Why do we do what we do? The findings have big implications for the nature of self-knowledge and how we react in the face of manipulation. You may not know yourself as well as you think you do.

16 MIN2018 MAR 7
Comments
Do you really know why you do what you do? | Petter Johansson

Latest Episodes

The rapid growth of the Chinese internet -- and where it's headed | Gary Liu

The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace -- it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed -- from the innovative, like AI-optimized train travel, to the dystopian, like a social credit rating that both rewards and restricts citizens.

12 MIN2018 JUL 9
Comments
The rapid growth of the Chinese internet -- and where it's headed | Gary Liu

How Netflix changed entertainment -- and where it's headed | Chris Anderson

Netflix changed the world of entertainment -- first with DVD-by-mail, then with streaming media and then again with sensational original shows like "Orange Is the New Black" and "Stranger Things" -- but not without taking its fair share of risks. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings discusses the company's bold internal culture, the powerful algorithm that fuels their recommendations, the $8 billion worth of content they're investing in this year and his philanthropic pursuits supporting innovative education, among much more.

20 MIN2018 JUN 21
Comments
How Netflix changed entertainment -- and where it's headed | Chris Anderson

Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John Doerr

Our leaders and institutions are failing us, but it's not always because they're bad or unethical, says venture capitalist John Doerr -- often, it's simply because they're leading us toward the wrong objectives. In this practical talk, Doerr shows us how we can get back on track with "Objectives and Key Results," or OKRs -- a goal-setting system that's been employed by the likes of Google, Intel and Bono to set and execute on audacious goals. Learn more about how setting the right goals can mean the difference between success and failure -- and how we can use OKRs to hold our leaders and ourselves accountable.

11 MIN2018 JUN 11
Comments
Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John Doerr

How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy Edmondson

Business school professor Amy Edmondson studies "teaming," where people come together quickly (and often temporarily) to solve new, urgent or unusual problems. Recalling stories of teamwork on the fly, such as the incredible rescue of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground in Chile in 2010, Edmondson shares the elements needed to turn a group of strangers into a quick-thinking team that can nimbly respond to challenges.

13 MIN2018 MAY 24
Comments
How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy Edmondson

The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert Neuwirth

From rides to homes and beyond, we're sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it's been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples -- like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water -- and says that if we can propagate and scale these models, they could help communities thrive from the bottom up.

9 MIN2018 MAY 17
Comments
The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert Neuwirth

A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate Raworth

What would a sustainable, universally beneficial economy look like? "Like a doughnut," says Oxford economist Kate Raworth. In a stellar, eye-opening talk, she explains how we can move countries out of the hole -- where people are falling short on life's essentials -- and create regenerative, distributive economies that work within the planet's ecological limits.

15 MIN2018 MAY 14
Comments
A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate Raworth

My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it | Drew Philp

In 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn't just learn how to repair a house -- he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about "radical neighborliness" and makes the case that we have "the power to create the world anew together and to do it ourselves when our governments refuse."

13 MIN2018 APR 4
Comments
My $500 house in Detroit -- and the neighbors who helped me rebuild it | Drew Philp

Need a new idea? Start at the edge of what is known | Vittorio Loreto

"Where do great ideas come from?" Starting with this question in mind, Vittorio Loreto takes us on a journey to explore a possible mathematical scheme that explains the birth of the new. Learn more about the "adjacent possible" -- the crossroads of what's actual and what's possible -- and how studying the math that drives it could explain how we create new ideas.

16 MIN2018 MAR 22
Comments
Need a new idea? Start at the edge of what is known | Vittorio Loreto

To solve the world's biggest problems, invest in women and girls | Musimbi Kanyoro

As CEO of the Global Fund for Women, Musimbi Kanyoro works to support women and their ideas so they can expand and grow. She introduces us to the Maragoli concept of "isirika" -- a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another -- something she sees women practicing all over the world. And she calls for those who have more to give more to people working to improve their communities. "Imagine what it would look like if you embraced isirika and made it your default," Kanyoro says. "What could we achieve for each other? For humanity?" Let's find out -- together.

14 MIN2018 MAR 8
Comments
To solve the world's biggest problems, invest in women and girls | Musimbi Kanyoro

Do you really know why you do what you do? | Petter Johansson

Experimental psychologist Petter Johansson researches choice blindness -- a phenomenon where we convince ourselves that we're getting what we want, even when we're not. In an eye-opening talk, he shares experiments (designed in collaboration with magicians!) that aim to answer the question: Why do we do what we do? The findings have big implications for the nature of self-knowledge and how we react in the face of manipulation. You may not know yourself as well as you think you do.

16 MIN2018 MAR 7
Comments
Do you really know why you do what you do? | Petter Johansson
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