Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

Stereo Chemistry

Chemical & Engineering News

1
Followers
10
Plays
Stereo Chemistry

Stereo Chemistry

Chemical & Engineering News

1
Followers
10
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Stereo Chemistry is C&EN's podcast that delivers chemistry's frontiers to your ears. C&EN is the news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Latest Episodes

On being #BlackInChem

In August 2020, Black chemists and allies took to Twitter to celebrate the inaugural #BlackInChem week. The campaign highlighted the diversity and accomplishments of Black chemists and also created space for candid discussions about the discrimination these scientists face in chemistry. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, we hear from Black chemists about the current state of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the chemical sciences and what non-Black allies can do to support Black chemists.

24 min23 h ago
Comments
On being #BlackInChem

Should organic chemistry’s name reactions go the way of mouth pipetting?

Chemists have been naming reactions after each other since about the early to mid 1800s. Nowadays, organic chemists in particular use them as a kind of shorthand. However, because the majority of name reactions honor white men, some organic chemists wonder if using these names is exclusionary. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, we hear from a plethora of organic chemists on how reactions get named, who they’re named after, and whether the practice should stop.

26 minAUG 20
Comments
Should organic chemistry’s name reactions go the way of mouth pipetting?

A world without Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Franklin and her lab assistant famously imaged the structure of DNA using X-ray crystallography, an achievement that directly facilitated James Watson and Francis Crick’s discovery of the double helix. For what would be Rosalind’s 100th birthday, the Stereo Chemistry team consults scientists and historians to envision the many ways the world might be different without the now-famous Photograph 51. Listen to the Distillations episode “Science on TV” at bit.ly/30yjZuU.

23 minJUL 23
Comments
A world without Rosalind Franklin

Bonus episode: Talking TSCA—is the chemical law living up to expectations?

This month marks 4 years since the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) was revised, giving the US EPA sweeping new authority to ensure that the 40,000+ chemicals in everyday products do not pose unreasonable risks to human health and the environment. In this bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry, we examine how the EPA is using that authority. Is the EPA protecting public health by sufficiently evaluating the risks of chemicals, or is it giving industry a free pass to market chemicals with little toxicity data?

17 minJUN 18
Comments
Bonus episode: Talking TSCA—is the chemical law living up to expectations?

The chemical culprit in 2019's mysterious vaping illnesses—what we still don't know

In the summer of 2019, clusters of patients began appearing in emergency rooms throughout the US with a mysterious lung disease. Investigators linked the illnesses to patients’ use of vaping products, and the cutting agent vitamin E acetate emerged as chief suspect. But many questions remain about how vitamin E acetate could have caused those injuries and whether it was acting alone. Stereo Chemistry sifts through the complicated chemistry of vaping and explores new evidence in the investigation.

29 minMAY 27
Comments
The chemical culprit in 2019's mysterious vaping illnesses—what we still don't know

Ep. 29: This virus is here now, it's going to stay with us

As COVID-19 continues to spread, so does the effort to treat and vaccinate against the novel coronavirus that causes the disease. Around the world, scientists are working on different therapies that they hope will quell the loss of life during this pandemic while, at the same time, setting us up to prevent future outbreaks. What’s not clear is which, if any, of these treatments will work. Much about SARS-CoV-2 remains unknown. In this episode, we dig into the efforts to beat the novel coronavirus.

34 minMAY 2
Comments
Ep. 29: This virus is here now, it's going to stay with us

Bonus episode: That just isn’t how you land on the moon without crashing

Fifty years ago this week, an explosion on the Apollo 13 moon mission stranded three astronauts hundreds of thousands of miles from home. You probably know that Fred Haise, Jim Lovell, and Jack Swigert made it home safely (water landing shown, with two of the astronauts in white). You may not know the chemist behind the rocket engine that saved them, which began its life as an apparatus for measuring chemical reaction rates. This bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry tells the story of the engine’s design with help from two of the people who created it. Listen now to a tale that starts with an explosion and ends with SpaceX’s pioneering reusable rockets, with one small step for a man along the way. CORRECTION: This episode was updated on April 15 to reflect that Fred Haise, not Ken Mattingly, flew aboard Apollo 13. On April 22, this podcast description was also corrected to reflect Haise's role and clarify that the photo shows only two of the astronauts. To learn more about the chemis...

13 minAPR 11
Comments
Bonus episode: That just isn’t how you land on the moon without crashing

So that's why we threw a robot into the back of a truck

Chemistry is going the way of computing: It’s getting smaller and faster. High-throughput experimentation, or HTE, is part of this push. Borrowing from biologists and biochemists, HTE has brought in microplates and multichannel pipettes to miniaturize reactions, as well as robots to run those reactions rapidly without sacrificing precision. But it’s also been around for decades. So why are so many in the field excited about HTE right now? Stereo Chemistry has your answers.

35 minMAR 19
Comments
So that's why we threw a robot into the back of a truck

We’re watching it very closely

As the novel coronavirus responsible for causing COVID-19 continues to spread, questions about the virus, the disease, and its impacts on our daily lives mount. To help you stay current with the science, policy, and business implications of this outbreak, C&EN has made all of its coronavirus coverage freely available at cenm.ag/coronavirus. In our latest bonus episode, we discuss one of the largest questions on the business front: How is the coronavirus affecting the global drug supply?

14 minMAR 11
Comments
We’re watching it very closely

We saw a lot of that scientific sage savior syndrome

Stereo Chemistry talked with six chemists who spent a year in Washington on a policy fellowship to find out what they learned and what advice they would give to other scientists who are interested in science policy.

14 minFEB 21
Comments
We saw a lot of that scientific sage savior syndrome

Latest Episodes

On being #BlackInChem

In August 2020, Black chemists and allies took to Twitter to celebrate the inaugural #BlackInChem week. The campaign highlighted the diversity and accomplishments of Black chemists and also created space for candid discussions about the discrimination these scientists face in chemistry. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, we hear from Black chemists about the current state of diversity, equity, and inclusion in the chemical sciences and what non-Black allies can do to support Black chemists.

24 min23 h ago
Comments
On being #BlackInChem

Should organic chemistry’s name reactions go the way of mouth pipetting?

Chemists have been naming reactions after each other since about the early to mid 1800s. Nowadays, organic chemists in particular use them as a kind of shorthand. However, because the majority of name reactions honor white men, some organic chemists wonder if using these names is exclusionary. In the latest episode of Stereo Chemistry, we hear from a plethora of organic chemists on how reactions get named, who they’re named after, and whether the practice should stop.

26 minAUG 20
Comments
Should organic chemistry’s name reactions go the way of mouth pipetting?

A world without Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Franklin and her lab assistant famously imaged the structure of DNA using X-ray crystallography, an achievement that directly facilitated James Watson and Francis Crick’s discovery of the double helix. For what would be Rosalind’s 100th birthday, the Stereo Chemistry team consults scientists and historians to envision the many ways the world might be different without the now-famous Photograph 51. Listen to the Distillations episode “Science on TV” at bit.ly/30yjZuU.

23 minJUL 23
Comments
A world without Rosalind Franklin

Bonus episode: Talking TSCA—is the chemical law living up to expectations?

This month marks 4 years since the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) was revised, giving the US EPA sweeping new authority to ensure that the 40,000+ chemicals in everyday products do not pose unreasonable risks to human health and the environment. In this bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry, we examine how the EPA is using that authority. Is the EPA protecting public health by sufficiently evaluating the risks of chemicals, or is it giving industry a free pass to market chemicals with little toxicity data?

17 minJUN 18
Comments
Bonus episode: Talking TSCA—is the chemical law living up to expectations?

The chemical culprit in 2019's mysterious vaping illnesses—what we still don't know

In the summer of 2019, clusters of patients began appearing in emergency rooms throughout the US with a mysterious lung disease. Investigators linked the illnesses to patients’ use of vaping products, and the cutting agent vitamin E acetate emerged as chief suspect. But many questions remain about how vitamin E acetate could have caused those injuries and whether it was acting alone. Stereo Chemistry sifts through the complicated chemistry of vaping and explores new evidence in the investigation.

29 minMAY 27
Comments
The chemical culprit in 2019's mysterious vaping illnesses—what we still don't know

Ep. 29: This virus is here now, it's going to stay with us

As COVID-19 continues to spread, so does the effort to treat and vaccinate against the novel coronavirus that causes the disease. Around the world, scientists are working on different therapies that they hope will quell the loss of life during this pandemic while, at the same time, setting us up to prevent future outbreaks. What’s not clear is which, if any, of these treatments will work. Much about SARS-CoV-2 remains unknown. In this episode, we dig into the efforts to beat the novel coronavirus.

34 minMAY 2
Comments
Ep. 29: This virus is here now, it's going to stay with us

Bonus episode: That just isn’t how you land on the moon without crashing

Fifty years ago this week, an explosion on the Apollo 13 moon mission stranded three astronauts hundreds of thousands of miles from home. You probably know that Fred Haise, Jim Lovell, and Jack Swigert made it home safely (water landing shown, with two of the astronauts in white). You may not know the chemist behind the rocket engine that saved them, which began its life as an apparatus for measuring chemical reaction rates. This bonus episode of Stereo Chemistry tells the story of the engine’s design with help from two of the people who created it. Listen now to a tale that starts with an explosion and ends with SpaceX’s pioneering reusable rockets, with one small step for a man along the way. CORRECTION: This episode was updated on April 15 to reflect that Fred Haise, not Ken Mattingly, flew aboard Apollo 13. On April 22, this podcast description was also corrected to reflect Haise's role and clarify that the photo shows only two of the astronauts. To learn more about the chemis...

13 minAPR 11
Comments
Bonus episode: That just isn’t how you land on the moon without crashing

So that's why we threw a robot into the back of a truck

Chemistry is going the way of computing: It’s getting smaller and faster. High-throughput experimentation, or HTE, is part of this push. Borrowing from biologists and biochemists, HTE has brought in microplates and multichannel pipettes to miniaturize reactions, as well as robots to run those reactions rapidly without sacrificing precision. But it’s also been around for decades. So why are so many in the field excited about HTE right now? Stereo Chemistry has your answers.

35 minMAR 19
Comments
So that's why we threw a robot into the back of a truck

We’re watching it very closely

As the novel coronavirus responsible for causing COVID-19 continues to spread, questions about the virus, the disease, and its impacts on our daily lives mount. To help you stay current with the science, policy, and business implications of this outbreak, C&EN has made all of its coronavirus coverage freely available at cenm.ag/coronavirus. In our latest bonus episode, we discuss one of the largest questions on the business front: How is the coronavirus affecting the global drug supply?

14 minMAR 11
Comments
We’re watching it very closely

We saw a lot of that scientific sage savior syndrome

Stereo Chemistry talked with six chemists who spent a year in Washington on a policy fellowship to find out what they learned and what advice they would give to other scientists who are interested in science policy.

14 minFEB 21
Comments
We saw a lot of that scientific sage savior syndrome
success toast
Welcome to Himalaya LearningDozens of podcourses featuring over 100 experts are waiting for you.