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The Big Story

Frequency Podcast Network

42
Followers
311
Plays
The Big Story

The Big Story

Frequency Podcast Network

42
Followers
311
Plays
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About Us

An in-depth look at the issues, culture and personalities shaping Canada today.

Latest Episodes

The case that gave birth to Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit

In 1988, Toronto lawyer Clayton Ruby represented the family of a young man named Michael Wade Lawson. Though neither Ruby, the family or anyone else involved at the time knew it, it’s a case that's had a profound impact on how policeforcesinCanada’s largest province do—and don’t—hold themselvesaccountable. Michael Wade Lawson, you see, was 17—a young Black man who was shot and killed by the police. After his death, amid a public outcry, Ontario's Special Investigations Unit was created, to investigate cases of police misconduct that resulted in injury or death to civilians. And that’s where today's story begins. GUEST: Clayton Ruby

16 min1 d ago
Comments
The case that gave birth to Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit

Inside the making of an incel

This November, accused killer Alek Minassian will face trial for the 2018 Toronto van attack that killed 10 people and injured 16. In the aftermath of that attack, we learned that Minassian subscribed to the incel ideology—which has been linked to mass killings around the world. Incels entered the public consciousness as lonely people obsessed with other people's sex lives. But in recent years they've become increasingly deadly. How do young men find themselves radicalized into the incel subculture online? Where are they slipping through the cracks? And how can we respond more effectively to signs of violence before it happens? GUEST: Katherine Laidlaw

20 min2 d ago
Comments
Inside the making of an incel

How hospitals are helping teachers as kids return to school

There are a lot of things that provincial back-to-school guidelines don't cover—because they can't. Every school is different, and so are the neighbourhoods they serve. And as students return, teachers and administrators often need answers, quickly, to problems they couldn't have foreseen. This is where a new program led by hospitals and doctors in Toronto's east end comes in. Each school is matched up with a doctor or hospital worker who can take their unique questions and come back to them with solutions. How can we do safe screenings with hundreds of kids and little outdoor space? How do you get toddlers to wear masks? What if physical distancing is impossible in my classroom? And at what point do we have to worry about uncontrolled outbreaks and school closures? GUEST: Dr. Janine McCready, infectious disease physician, Michael Garron Hospital

22 min3 d ago
Comments
How hospitals are helping teachers as kids return to school

They defended their land, then the government abandoned them

It's been 25 years since the Ipperwash crisis and the killing of Dudley George. Long enough that there's a generation that doesn't remember it—but they have plenty of examples of modern-day land defenders standing up against the government. But the original protesters, who took back land the government had promised to return to them 50 years ago and won? They're still there. Still living at Stony Point. Still waiting for the military to clean up the mess it left behind. Still holding out hope of returning the land to its lush former glory. And in the meantime, they're trying to live on what the government left behind. GUEST: Cristina Howorun, CityNews

20 min4 d ago
Comments
They defended their land, then the government abandoned them

Do you need a news detox?

Are you addicted to the news? Don't lie! It's understandable. This year has been hard, and everything feels like a crisis sometimes, and some of us can't look away. Not knowing what's happening in the world at all is not an option, but what if we don't have to know everything absolutely immediately? Is it possible to regulate the way you consume the news without missing out on the things that matter? Is it possible to go cold turkey for a little while to break the habit? GUEST: Peter Laufer,James Wallace Chair Professor in Journalism at the University of Oregon, author of Dreaming in TurtleandUp Against the Wall: The Case for Opening the Mexican-U.S. Border.

20 min5 d ago
Comments
Do you need a news detox?

Back to school for some. Private learning pods for others.

It's been a chaotic and eventful—and still not yet close to done—return to schools across Canada. A majority of parents have chosen to return their kids to the classroom. Other have opted for remote learning either by necessity or preference. And then there are the private pods—small bubbles of a few families, taught by a teacher hired to work privately. Of course, having the means to afford private instructions for your kids is a privilege. It's a sign of inequality in education access. And if the pandemic lingers and drives more families to this solution, it could potentially undermine the school system. But should any of that matter to parents whose first job is to keep their children safe in the best environment possible? GUEST: Matt Gurney, National Post, Code 47

25 min1 w ago
Comments
Back to school for some. Private learning pods for others.

A story about the family that just kept growing

In a large house, in a very nice area of Toronto, in the 1970s and 80s, there lived a normal family: Mom, dad, kids. Roughly thirtykids, actually, most of them adoptedfrom all over the worlds.Thirty kids with different languages, needs, dreams and personalities. Why did they do it? What happened when they did? What kind of legacy does the Simpson family leave behind today in a city and country they helped build just be being a normal, loving, ever-growing family? GUEST: Nicholas Hune-Brown, Toronto Life

22 min1 w ago
Comments
A story about the family that just kept growing

Will outer space become the new Wild West?

When SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy took off from a NASA launchpad this year, it marked a new era of manned spaceflight, one in which private businesses have as much of a stake in success as government space agencies. But have we stopped along the way to think about the ramifications of that? What rules do companies like SpaceX have to follow once they are out on the final frontier? If they break them, who makes sure they pay for it? And as technology evolves at a rapid pace and these partnerships become more common, who or what stops space from becoming the new wild west? GUEST: Michael O'Shea

20 min1 w ago
Comments
Will outer space become the new Wild West?

Canada’s new approach to treating obesity

A lot of Canadians are obese. That's a fact. But a lot of the things you think you know about that fact—why they're obese, how they could lose weight, what they need to hear from their doctors—just aren't true. Last month Canada unveiled a new set of guidelines for treating obesity, and the biggest headline among the recommendations was: "No dieting." But the guidelines don't stop there. From an acceptance of surgery as a solution, challenging the biases of doctors and looking at obesity as a science-based problem, they call for a dramatic change in approach to the problem. Will they work? Will we follow them? GUEST: Dr. Sean Wharton

22 min1 w ago
Comments
Canada’s new approach to treating obesity

Your guide to government benefits after the CERB

It was a program created at unimaginable speed under incredible circumstances. And it has helped millions of Canadians. But six months later—two months longer than initially planned—the federal government is ending the Canada Emergency Response Benefit. So what’s next? Expanded EI qualifications, new programs for those who don't qualify for EI and other efforts aimed at supporting workers still impacted by COVID-19. Who qualifies? For how much? How quickly and for how long? And what do you need to prepare to apply? We've got a guide to post-CERB Canadian government help. GUEST: Rosa Saba, business reporter, Toronto Star

17 min2 w ago
Comments
Your guide to government benefits after the CERB

Latest Episodes

The case that gave birth to Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit

In 1988, Toronto lawyer Clayton Ruby represented the family of a young man named Michael Wade Lawson. Though neither Ruby, the family or anyone else involved at the time knew it, it’s a case that's had a profound impact on how policeforcesinCanada’s largest province do—and don’t—hold themselvesaccountable. Michael Wade Lawson, you see, was 17—a young Black man who was shot and killed by the police. After his death, amid a public outcry, Ontario's Special Investigations Unit was created, to investigate cases of police misconduct that resulted in injury or death to civilians. And that’s where today's story begins. GUEST: Clayton Ruby

16 min1 d ago
Comments
The case that gave birth to Ontario’s Special Investigations Unit

Inside the making of an incel

This November, accused killer Alek Minassian will face trial for the 2018 Toronto van attack that killed 10 people and injured 16. In the aftermath of that attack, we learned that Minassian subscribed to the incel ideology—which has been linked to mass killings around the world. Incels entered the public consciousness as lonely people obsessed with other people's sex lives. But in recent years they've become increasingly deadly. How do young men find themselves radicalized into the incel subculture online? Where are they slipping through the cracks? And how can we respond more effectively to signs of violence before it happens? GUEST: Katherine Laidlaw

20 min2 d ago
Comments
Inside the making of an incel

How hospitals are helping teachers as kids return to school

There are a lot of things that provincial back-to-school guidelines don't cover—because they can't. Every school is different, and so are the neighbourhoods they serve. And as students return, teachers and administrators often need answers, quickly, to problems they couldn't have foreseen. This is where a new program led by hospitals and doctors in Toronto's east end comes in. Each school is matched up with a doctor or hospital worker who can take their unique questions and come back to them with solutions. How can we do safe screenings with hundreds of kids and little outdoor space? How do you get toddlers to wear masks? What if physical distancing is impossible in my classroom? And at what point do we have to worry about uncontrolled outbreaks and school closures? GUEST: Dr. Janine McCready, infectious disease physician, Michael Garron Hospital

22 min3 d ago
Comments
How hospitals are helping teachers as kids return to school

They defended their land, then the government abandoned them

It's been 25 years since the Ipperwash crisis and the killing of Dudley George. Long enough that there's a generation that doesn't remember it—but they have plenty of examples of modern-day land defenders standing up against the government. But the original protesters, who took back land the government had promised to return to them 50 years ago and won? They're still there. Still living at Stony Point. Still waiting for the military to clean up the mess it left behind. Still holding out hope of returning the land to its lush former glory. And in the meantime, they're trying to live on what the government left behind. GUEST: Cristina Howorun, CityNews

20 min4 d ago
Comments
They defended their land, then the government abandoned them

Do you need a news detox?

Are you addicted to the news? Don't lie! It's understandable. This year has been hard, and everything feels like a crisis sometimes, and some of us can't look away. Not knowing what's happening in the world at all is not an option, but what if we don't have to know everything absolutely immediately? Is it possible to regulate the way you consume the news without missing out on the things that matter? Is it possible to go cold turkey for a little while to break the habit? GUEST: Peter Laufer,James Wallace Chair Professor in Journalism at the University of Oregon, author of Dreaming in TurtleandUp Against the Wall: The Case for Opening the Mexican-U.S. Border.

20 min5 d ago
Comments
Do you need a news detox?

Back to school for some. Private learning pods for others.

It's been a chaotic and eventful—and still not yet close to done—return to schools across Canada. A majority of parents have chosen to return their kids to the classroom. Other have opted for remote learning either by necessity or preference. And then there are the private pods—small bubbles of a few families, taught by a teacher hired to work privately. Of course, having the means to afford private instructions for your kids is a privilege. It's a sign of inequality in education access. And if the pandemic lingers and drives more families to this solution, it could potentially undermine the school system. But should any of that matter to parents whose first job is to keep their children safe in the best environment possible? GUEST: Matt Gurney, National Post, Code 47

25 min1 w ago
Comments
Back to school for some. Private learning pods for others.

A story about the family that just kept growing

In a large house, in a very nice area of Toronto, in the 1970s and 80s, there lived a normal family: Mom, dad, kids. Roughly thirtykids, actually, most of them adoptedfrom all over the worlds.Thirty kids with different languages, needs, dreams and personalities. Why did they do it? What happened when they did? What kind of legacy does the Simpson family leave behind today in a city and country they helped build just be being a normal, loving, ever-growing family? GUEST: Nicholas Hune-Brown, Toronto Life

22 min1 w ago
Comments
A story about the family that just kept growing

Will outer space become the new Wild West?

When SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy took off from a NASA launchpad this year, it marked a new era of manned spaceflight, one in which private businesses have as much of a stake in success as government space agencies. But have we stopped along the way to think about the ramifications of that? What rules do companies like SpaceX have to follow once they are out on the final frontier? If they break them, who makes sure they pay for it? And as technology evolves at a rapid pace and these partnerships become more common, who or what stops space from becoming the new wild west? GUEST: Michael O'Shea

20 min1 w ago
Comments
Will outer space become the new Wild West?

Canada’s new approach to treating obesity

A lot of Canadians are obese. That's a fact. But a lot of the things you think you know about that fact—why they're obese, how they could lose weight, what they need to hear from their doctors—just aren't true. Last month Canada unveiled a new set of guidelines for treating obesity, and the biggest headline among the recommendations was: "No dieting." But the guidelines don't stop there. From an acceptance of surgery as a solution, challenging the biases of doctors and looking at obesity as a science-based problem, they call for a dramatic change in approach to the problem. Will they work? Will we follow them? GUEST: Dr. Sean Wharton

22 min1 w ago
Comments
Canada’s new approach to treating obesity

Your guide to government benefits after the CERB

It was a program created at unimaginable speed under incredible circumstances. And it has helped millions of Canadians. But six months later—two months longer than initially planned—the federal government is ending the Canada Emergency Response Benefit. So what’s next? Expanded EI qualifications, new programs for those who don't qualify for EI and other efforts aimed at supporting workers still impacted by COVID-19. Who qualifies? For how much? How quickly and for how long? And what do you need to prepare to apply? We've got a guide to post-CERB Canadian government help. GUEST: Rosa Saba, business reporter, Toronto Star

17 min2 w ago
Comments
Your guide to government benefits after the CERB
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