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CREECA Lecture Series Podcast

Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

8
Followers
25
Plays
CREECA Lecture Series Podcast

CREECA Lecture Series Podcast

Center for Russia, East Europe, and Central Asia at the University of Wisconsin, Madison

8
Followers
25
Plays
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About Us

CREECA’s mission is to support research, teaching, and outreach on Russia, Eastern and Central Europe, and Central Asia. We approach this three-part mission by promoting faculty research across a range of disciplines; by supporting graduate and undergraduate teaching and training related to the region; and by serving as a community resource through outreach activities targeted to K-12 teachers and students, other institutions of higher education, and the general public. As a U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center, CREECA hosts a variety of events and lectures which are free and open to the public. You can find recordings of past events here.

Latest Episodes

Annus Mirabilis? The Lessons and Legacies of 1989 - Barbara Falk (3.5.20)

After the fall of communism, regardless of debates on the nature of systemic change, most agreed on the importance of non-violence. In this paper, I argue that the year 1989 represented a revolution in the very idea of revolution—self-limiting, non-violent, and yet far reaching in impact. However, Cold War triumphalist narratives and Western liberal mis-readings have together misrepresented the lessons and legacies of 1989, generating a “recipe-based” approach to regime change. Yet today multipolar great power politics, the soft power decline of the United States and liberal democracy more generally, an international legal regime that dis-incentivizes unpopular authoritarians to step away from power, and the moral hazard associated with the doctrine of Responsibility to Protect, have made non-violent or “1989-type” revolutions far less likely.

58 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Annus Mirabilis? The Lessons and Legacies of 1989 - Barbara Falk (3.5.20)

Civil War and the Polarization of Ethnic Identities: Evidence from Bosnia - Chris Price (2.20.20)

While recent findings suggest that violence during civil war can generate pro-social behavior, why do we often see polarization between groups based on ethnic, religious, or sectarian differences after conflict? What conditions explain why we see this in some cases, but not others? These questions matter, given that polarization complicates peacebuilding, affects post-war party politics, and may lead to a return to conflict. Presenting evidence from Bosnia, Price argues that how violence is targeted during civil war is essential to explaining the observed variation. Collective violence increases the salience of group identity while selective violence is unlikely to provoke these responses. Where these changes are widespread, they aggregate into cleavages, the social divisions which define political competition, and these results may persist well past the initial conflict.

71 MINFEB 27
Comments
Civil War and the Polarization of Ethnic Identities: Evidence from Bosnia - Chris Price (2.20.20)

Using election forensics on election manipulation in Russia & Ukraine - Cole Harvey (2.13.20)

Election forensics is a growing field of statistical techniques that can be used to detect suspicious patterns in election data. Researchers are increasingly turning to such methods to detect and evaluate potential manipulation in elections, both internationally and in the US. This lecture will present a brief overview of the state of the art, discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the election forensic approach, and then demonstrate how election forensic methods can be used to study variation in electoral manipulation at the subnational level in Russia and Ukraine. In particular, it will show how the type of election manipulation that parties employ in a territory depends both on their access to patronage resources and the degree to which they face political risks in that region.

61 MINFEB 19
Comments
Using election forensics on election manipulation in Russia & Ukraine - Cole Harvey (2.13.20)

Scorched Maps: Adventure, Memory, & History in Różycki's Twelve Stations - Łukasz Wodzyński (2.6.20)

Wodzyński examines the cultural expression of adventure in post-communist east central Europe through Tomasz Różycki's modern classic, the epic poem in prose Twelve Stations (2004). The work, with its elements of satire and questing, is a prime example of the use of the adventure romance form to intervene in the realm of collective and cultural memory.

67 MINFEB 14
Comments
Scorched Maps: Adventure, Memory, & History in Różycki's Twelve Stations - Łukasz Wodzyński (2.6.20)

From Protest Rallies to Local Activism: Political Culture in Russia - Natalia Savelyeva (1.30.20)

Savelyeva explores the transformation of political culture in Russia from 2011-2019, describing a shift in attitudes toward protest, changes in the motivations and strategies of the opposition, and the burgeoning role of local activism in these movements.

59 MINFEB 6
Comments
From Protest Rallies to Local Activism: Political Culture in Russia - Natalia Savelyeva (1.30.20)

Belarus - a country that does not need democracy (or does it?)- Yuliya Brel (1.23.20)

Brel considers the post-communist development of the Republic of Belarus and suggests an answer to the question of why the country failed to democratize. Employing modernization theory, the presentation analyzes the connection between economic development and democracy, and between civil society and democracy. It also explores the idea that the absence of a strong national consciousness might have contributed to the country’s inability to democratize.

77 MINFEB 6
Comments
Belarus - a country that does not need democracy (or does it?)- Yuliya Brel (1.23.20)

Russia: Rise and Fall of the Rule of Law - Hon. Sidney Brooks (11.14.19(

In this talk, Brooks will present an abbreviated statement of fact and personal experience dealing with the Supreme Commercial (Arbitrazh) Court of Russia from 1991 to 2016. He will tell the first-hand story of working with the Court as it reformed and adopted principles intrinsic to an independent, objective, and fair court system, and practices consistent with the rule of law, individual rights, transparency and deterring corruption. The lecture will conclude with a discussion of governmental and political pressures which rolled back much commercial court reform.

64 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
Russia: Rise and Fall of the Rule of Law - Hon. Sidney Brooks (11.14.19(

Webs of Corruption: Trafficking and Terrorism in Central Asia - Mariya Omelicheva (11.7.19)

The interconnected terrorist and criminal milieus are believed to be a critical destabilizing factor in today’s global security environment, yet the trafficking/terrorism nexus remains highly politicized and loosely applied concept. What is the nature of trafficking/terrorism connections and how do they vary across states? Does the trafficking/terrorism nexus amplify the threat of terrorist violence? Focusing on Central Asia, this presentation offers surprising answers to these and other questions. It challenges the assumption that the intersection of terrorist and criminal activity is a prevalent, or even a common, occurrence.

68 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Webs of Corruption: Trafficking and Terrorism in Central Asia - Mariya Omelicheva (11.7.19)

Affect and Autocracy: Emotions and Attitudes in Russia after Crimea - Graeme Robertson (10.31.19)

Popular understanding of modern authoritarianism lacks a satisfying explanation for the genuine popularity of autocrats, as many clearly enjoy enthusiastic support even in times of economic stagnation or decline. In their recently published book, Robertson and his co-author argue that part of the solution lies in unpacking the role of emotions in building support for rulers. Drawing on a unique panel survey conducted shortly before and after Russia’s annexation of Crimea, they discover that the resulting “rally” around the authoritarian flag involves much more than simply support for the leader or a simple increase in nationalism. Rather, they witness a broad shift in respondents’ emotional orientation. Driven by the shared, mediated experience of the Crimean “moment”, this shift improves people’s evaluation of their social, political and economic surroundings in the present, the future – and even the past.

77 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Affect and Autocracy: Emotions and Attitudes in Russia after Crimea - Graeme Robertson (10.31.19)

Roma Filmic Representation as Postcolonial ‘Object’ - Sunnie Rucker-Chang (10.17.19)

In this talk Dr. Rucker-Chang employs a postcolonial frame to highlight how the depiction of Roma in post-Yugoslav film render them postcolonial “objects,” knowable by way of difference constructed through racial hierarchies, stereotypes, and culture.

42 MIN2019 OCT 21
Comments
Roma Filmic Representation as Postcolonial ‘Object’ - Sunnie Rucker-Chang (10.17.19)

Latest Episodes

Annus Mirabilis? The Lessons and Legacies of 1989 - Barbara Falk (3.5.20)

After the fall of communism, regardless of debates on the nature of systemic change, most agreed on the importance of non-violence. In this paper, I argue that the year 1989 represented a revolution in the very idea of revolution—self-limiting, non-violent, and yet far reaching in impact. However, Cold War triumphalist narratives and Western liberal mis-readings have together misrepresented the lessons and legacies of 1989, generating a “recipe-based” approach to regime change. Yet today multipolar great power politics, the soft power decline of the United States and liberal democracy more generally, an international legal regime that dis-incentivizes unpopular authoritarians to step away from power, and the moral hazard associated with the doctrine of Responsibility to Protect, have made non-violent or “1989-type” revolutions far less likely.

58 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Annus Mirabilis? The Lessons and Legacies of 1989 - Barbara Falk (3.5.20)

Civil War and the Polarization of Ethnic Identities: Evidence from Bosnia - Chris Price (2.20.20)

While recent findings suggest that violence during civil war can generate pro-social behavior, why do we often see polarization between groups based on ethnic, religious, or sectarian differences after conflict? What conditions explain why we see this in some cases, but not others? These questions matter, given that polarization complicates peacebuilding, affects post-war party politics, and may lead to a return to conflict. Presenting evidence from Bosnia, Price argues that how violence is targeted during civil war is essential to explaining the observed variation. Collective violence increases the salience of group identity while selective violence is unlikely to provoke these responses. Where these changes are widespread, they aggregate into cleavages, the social divisions which define political competition, and these results may persist well past the initial conflict.

71 MINFEB 27
Comments
Civil War and the Polarization of Ethnic Identities: Evidence from Bosnia - Chris Price (2.20.20)

Using election forensics on election manipulation in Russia & Ukraine - Cole Harvey (2.13.20)

Election forensics is a growing field of statistical techniques that can be used to detect suspicious patterns in election data. Researchers are increasingly turning to such methods to detect and evaluate potential manipulation in elections, both internationally and in the US. This lecture will present a brief overview of the state of the art, discuss the benefits and drawbacks of the election forensic approach, and then demonstrate how election forensic methods can be used to study variation in electoral manipulation at the subnational level in Russia and Ukraine. In particular, it will show how the type of election manipulation that parties employ in a territory depends both on their access to patronage resources and the degree to which they face political risks in that region.

61 MINFEB 19
Comments
Using election forensics on election manipulation in Russia & Ukraine - Cole Harvey (2.13.20)

Scorched Maps: Adventure, Memory, & History in Różycki's Twelve Stations - Łukasz Wodzyński (2.6.20)

Wodzyński examines the cultural expression of adventure in post-communist east central Europe through Tomasz Różycki's modern classic, the epic poem in prose Twelve Stations (2004). The work, with its elements of satire and questing, is a prime example of the use of the adventure romance form to intervene in the realm of collective and cultural memory.

67 MINFEB 14
Comments
Scorched Maps: Adventure, Memory, & History in Różycki's Twelve Stations - Łukasz Wodzyński (2.6.20)

From Protest Rallies to Local Activism: Political Culture in Russia - Natalia Savelyeva (1.30.20)

Savelyeva explores the transformation of political culture in Russia from 2011-2019, describing a shift in attitudes toward protest, changes in the motivations and strategies of the opposition, and the burgeoning role of local activism in these movements.

59 MINFEB 6
Comments
From Protest Rallies to Local Activism: Political Culture in Russia - Natalia Savelyeva (1.30.20)

Belarus - a country that does not need democracy (or does it?)- Yuliya Brel (1.23.20)

Brel considers the post-communist development of the Republic of Belarus and suggests an answer to the question of why the country failed to democratize. Employing modernization theory, the presentation analyzes the connection between economic development and democracy, and between civil society and democracy. It also explores the idea that the absence of a strong national consciousness might have contributed to the country’s inability to democratize.

77 MINFEB 6
Comments
Belarus - a country that does not need democracy (or does it?)- Yuliya Brel (1.23.20)

Russia: Rise and Fall of the Rule of Law - Hon. Sidney Brooks (11.14.19(

In this talk, Brooks will present an abbreviated statement of fact and personal experience dealing with the Supreme Commercial (Arbitrazh) Court of Russia from 1991 to 2016. He will tell the first-hand story of working with the Court as it reformed and adopted principles intrinsic to an independent, objective, and fair court system, and practices consistent with the rule of law, individual rights, transparency and deterring corruption. The lecture will conclude with a discussion of governmental and political pressures which rolled back much commercial court reform.

64 MIN2019 DEC 19
Comments
Russia: Rise and Fall of the Rule of Law - Hon. Sidney Brooks (11.14.19(

Webs of Corruption: Trafficking and Terrorism in Central Asia - Mariya Omelicheva (11.7.19)

The interconnected terrorist and criminal milieus are believed to be a critical destabilizing factor in today’s global security environment, yet the trafficking/terrorism nexus remains highly politicized and loosely applied concept. What is the nature of trafficking/terrorism connections and how do they vary across states? Does the trafficking/terrorism nexus amplify the threat of terrorist violence? Focusing on Central Asia, this presentation offers surprising answers to these and other questions. It challenges the assumption that the intersection of terrorist and criminal activity is a prevalent, or even a common, occurrence.

68 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Webs of Corruption: Trafficking and Terrorism in Central Asia - Mariya Omelicheva (11.7.19)

Affect and Autocracy: Emotions and Attitudes in Russia after Crimea - Graeme Robertson (10.31.19)

Popular understanding of modern authoritarianism lacks a satisfying explanation for the genuine popularity of autocrats, as many clearly enjoy enthusiastic support even in times of economic stagnation or decline. In their recently published book, Robertson and his co-author argue that part of the solution lies in unpacking the role of emotions in building support for rulers. Drawing on a unique panel survey conducted shortly before and after Russia’s annexation of Crimea, they discover that the resulting “rally” around the authoritarian flag involves much more than simply support for the leader or a simple increase in nationalism. Rather, they witness a broad shift in respondents’ emotional orientation. Driven by the shared, mediated experience of the Crimean “moment”, this shift improves people’s evaluation of their social, political and economic surroundings in the present, the future – and even the past.

77 MIN2019 NOV 14
Comments
Affect and Autocracy: Emotions and Attitudes in Russia after Crimea - Graeme Robertson (10.31.19)

Roma Filmic Representation as Postcolonial ‘Object’ - Sunnie Rucker-Chang (10.17.19)

In this talk Dr. Rucker-Chang employs a postcolonial frame to highlight how the depiction of Roma in post-Yugoslav film render them postcolonial “objects,” knowable by way of difference constructed through racial hierarchies, stereotypes, and culture.

42 MIN2019 OCT 21
Comments
Roma Filmic Representation as Postcolonial ‘Object’ - Sunnie Rucker-Chang (10.17.19)
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