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Extensive Reading Podcast

Jose Camino and Travis Past

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Extensive Reading Podcast

Extensive Reading Podcast

Jose Camino and Travis Past

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An intensive look at Extensive Reading

Latest Episodes

#26 ER and the use of the first language: An interview with Amanda Gillis-Furutaka

Last August we went to Kyoto Sangyo University to interview Professor Amanda Gillis-Furutaka. She has been teaching there for over twenty years, contributing to establish and maintain a large extensive reading programme at this university. Over the last few years, she has been carrying out qualitative research on the thought processes that occur when we do ER in a second or foreign language. In this episode, Professor Gillis-Furutaka tells us about some of the most interesting insights that she has obtained through her interviews with students of different ages and levels. Listen and learn about the various factors affecting graded reader readability besides the number of headwords, about the many ways in which the L1 is involved while reading in an L2, and about the interplay between working memory and the practice of extensive reading. Resources: In this 2012 article you can find information about the ER programme at Kyoto Sangyo University. http://erfoundation.org/proceedings/erw...

--2018 OCT 8
Comments
#26 ER and the use of the first language: An interview with Amanda Gillis-Furutaka

#25 Voices on future research on ER

We have dedicated our 25th episode to the future of ER research. There are so many things that we still don’t know about ER that it is not easy to decide where to start looking. In our case, we begun by seeking out the opinions of two long-time ER practitioners and advocates with extensive experience conducting research in this field: Rob Waring and Tom Robb. Both of them have already been on the podcast in the past, Professor Robb in episodes 3 and 4, and Professor Waring in episodes 21 and 22. From different perspectives, they suggest a myriad ways in which we can broaden our knowledge of everything that surrounds extensive reading. In this article by Professor Waring he lists many questions concerning ER that remain unanswered today and that he discusses in the podcast. http://www.robwaring.org/papers/various/assesser.html

--2018 SEP 7
Comments
#25 Voices on future research on ER

#24: An interview with Marcos Benevides

There are so many ways in which Tokyo Oberlin University Professor Marcos Benevides, our guest for our 24th episode, is connected with ER that it is hard to chose one to start with. For one thing, for the last six years he has been using extensive reading as part of an English programme for 2,000 students that he coordinates at his university. Also, he is an author and editor of graded readers, and the founder of a very particular collection: Atama ii Books, which you can sample here [http://www.gtcpub.com/Class/atamaii/tada/2016se/content/page1.htm]. Finally, he has also experienced first-hand the effect of reading on successfully learning and acquiring a new language (he was born in Brazil and moved to Canada with his family when we has eleven years old). Professor Benevides tells us in detail about all these experiences in this interview.

--2018 AUG 20
Comments
#24: An interview with Marcos Benevides

#23: The symbiotic relationship between intentional vocabulary learning and ER: An interview with Charles Browne

I first saw Dr. Charles Browne a few months ago at JALT’s PanSIG in Tokyo. He was giving a talk in a room that was almost as packed as a Japanese train during rush hour. He was introducing ER Central, whichis a website that he created with Rob Waring, where students and teachers can find a myriad ER-related resources, and he was glowing. You could tell that he was passionate about it. I immediately thought that we had to have him on the podcast. So I told Travis and we got in touch with him. We asked him if he would give us an interview and, to our delight, he said yes in no time. Our original idea was just to have him introduce his website to our audience, but the interview flowed in different directions and became something that I find even more interesting. Among many other things, it included a really nice section on what Dr. Browne calls a symbiotic relationship between extensive reading and intentional vocabulary learning, for example, by means of flashcards. Check outhttps:/...

--2018 JUL 26
Comments
#23: The symbiotic relationship between intentional vocabulary learning and ER: An interview with Charles Browne

#22 The Foundations Reading Library. An interview with Rob Waring (part II)

In the second part of our interview with Dr. Rob Waring, he tells us about his experiences as author and editor of graded readers in general, with particular reference to a very successful collection whose books he co-authored with Maurice Jamall: Heinle Cengage’s Foundations Reading Library. For those of you who want to know more about the topic of this podcast, here are a couple of nice readings: First, a text by Rob Waring on the art of writing graded readers. https://www.er-central.com/authors/writing-a-graded-reader/writing-graded-readers-rob-waring/ Second, an article by Stuart McLean on the graded reader collection we discuss in the interview. http://jalt-publications.org/content/index.php/jer/article/view/5 Note: we recorded this episode before this week’s horrible floods in Japan and feel a little embarrassed about how lightly we talk about the rain in the episode.

--2018 JUL 10
Comments
#22 The Foundations Reading Library. An interview with Rob Waring (part II)

#21: The mathematics of language scream at us. An interview with Rob Waring

Whenever we asked our guests for tips on who to interview next, Dr. Rob Waring’s name popped up almost immediately. When we asked Paul Goldberg, he told us that nobody made the case for extensive reading like he did, and that if you were in the same room with him and did not support extensive reading yet, he would be fast to make you change your mind about it. In this episode, which includes the first part of our interview, Dr. Waring tells us about his experiences with ER, including the first ER colloquium in 1997 and the creation of the ER Foundation. He also tells us about how vocabulary research shows that there is a no other way but to do extensive reading if our students are to learn the many words and lexical units they need to learn the target L2. Here’s a link to an article by Dr. Waring whose title says it all: The inescapable case for extensive reading. [insert link: http://www.robwaring.org/er/what_and_why/er_is_vital.htm]

--2018 JUL 3
Comments
#21: The mathematics of language scream at us. An interview with Rob Waring

#20 Chinese Graded Readers and ER in Chinese

After a long break that we took following the beginning of the academic year in Japan, we are back with a new episode and a new interview. This time we deal with extensive reading in Chinese. We do so in the company of Chinese language consultants Jared Turner and John Pasden, who have put together a collection of graded readers in Chinese called Mandarin Companion. In the interview they discuss their experiences reading and doing extensive reading in Chinese, and also the challenges of creating Chinese reading materials that are both interesting and useful to learners of the language.

--2018 JUN 19
Comments
#20 Chinese Graded Readers and ER in Chinese

#19: Cheating in extensive reading programmes

For our nineteenth episode we have an interview with professors Naeko Naganuma and Patrick Daugherty, from Akita International University, in the north of Japan. In the interview they tell us about the research that they have recently carried out on academic dishonesty in extensive reading programmes and they suggest a number of ways in which teachers can discourage cheating while making the student’ extensive reading more engaging and rewarding.

--2018 MAR 19
Comments
#19: Cheating in extensive reading programmes

#18: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part II)

In the second part of the interview, Professor Nation discusses different ways of doing extensive reading depending on whether one’s target is more fluency or vocabulary oriented, the need to make sure that the students know the reasons why they should be doing ER, the amount of reading that students ought to do, questions of vocabulary and frequency, and of course, the role of output in language acquisition and learning.

--2018 MAR 10
Comments
#18: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part II)

#17: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part I)

Professor Paul Nation, our guest for this and the following episode, needs no introduction. His name has been recurrently popping up in previous shows, mostly in discussions about the role of extensive reading within language teaching in general. In this first part of the interview he discusses just that: his ‘four strands’ approach to language teaching, and also their implications for the way we understand teachers’ roles and extensive reading. In the context of this discussion, Professor Nation also comments on Professor Akio Furukawa’s celebrated ER programme, and on the role of speed reading courses to improve reading fluency.

--2018 MAR 4
Comments
#17: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part I)

Latest Episodes

#26 ER and the use of the first language: An interview with Amanda Gillis-Furutaka

Last August we went to Kyoto Sangyo University to interview Professor Amanda Gillis-Furutaka. She has been teaching there for over twenty years, contributing to establish and maintain a large extensive reading programme at this university. Over the last few years, she has been carrying out qualitative research on the thought processes that occur when we do ER in a second or foreign language. In this episode, Professor Gillis-Furutaka tells us about some of the most interesting insights that she has obtained through her interviews with students of different ages and levels. Listen and learn about the various factors affecting graded reader readability besides the number of headwords, about the many ways in which the L1 is involved while reading in an L2, and about the interplay between working memory and the practice of extensive reading. Resources: In this 2012 article you can find information about the ER programme at Kyoto Sangyo University. http://erfoundation.org/proceedings/erw...

--2018 OCT 8
Comments
#26 ER and the use of the first language: An interview with Amanda Gillis-Furutaka

#25 Voices on future research on ER

We have dedicated our 25th episode to the future of ER research. There are so many things that we still don’t know about ER that it is not easy to decide where to start looking. In our case, we begun by seeking out the opinions of two long-time ER practitioners and advocates with extensive experience conducting research in this field: Rob Waring and Tom Robb. Both of them have already been on the podcast in the past, Professor Robb in episodes 3 and 4, and Professor Waring in episodes 21 and 22. From different perspectives, they suggest a myriad ways in which we can broaden our knowledge of everything that surrounds extensive reading. In this article by Professor Waring he lists many questions concerning ER that remain unanswered today and that he discusses in the podcast. http://www.robwaring.org/papers/various/assesser.html

--2018 SEP 7
Comments
#25 Voices on future research on ER

#24: An interview with Marcos Benevides

There are so many ways in which Tokyo Oberlin University Professor Marcos Benevides, our guest for our 24th episode, is connected with ER that it is hard to chose one to start with. For one thing, for the last six years he has been using extensive reading as part of an English programme for 2,000 students that he coordinates at his university. Also, he is an author and editor of graded readers, and the founder of a very particular collection: Atama ii Books, which you can sample here [http://www.gtcpub.com/Class/atamaii/tada/2016se/content/page1.htm]. Finally, he has also experienced first-hand the effect of reading on successfully learning and acquiring a new language (he was born in Brazil and moved to Canada with his family when we has eleven years old). Professor Benevides tells us in detail about all these experiences in this interview.

--2018 AUG 20
Comments
#24: An interview with Marcos Benevides

#23: The symbiotic relationship between intentional vocabulary learning and ER: An interview with Charles Browne

I first saw Dr. Charles Browne a few months ago at JALT’s PanSIG in Tokyo. He was giving a talk in a room that was almost as packed as a Japanese train during rush hour. He was introducing ER Central, whichis a website that he created with Rob Waring, where students and teachers can find a myriad ER-related resources, and he was glowing. You could tell that he was passionate about it. I immediately thought that we had to have him on the podcast. So I told Travis and we got in touch with him. We asked him if he would give us an interview and, to our delight, he said yes in no time. Our original idea was just to have him introduce his website to our audience, but the interview flowed in different directions and became something that I find even more interesting. Among many other things, it included a really nice section on what Dr. Browne calls a symbiotic relationship between extensive reading and intentional vocabulary learning, for example, by means of flashcards. Check outhttps:/...

--2018 JUL 26
Comments
#23: The symbiotic relationship between intentional vocabulary learning and ER: An interview with Charles Browne

#22 The Foundations Reading Library. An interview with Rob Waring (part II)

In the second part of our interview with Dr. Rob Waring, he tells us about his experiences as author and editor of graded readers in general, with particular reference to a very successful collection whose books he co-authored with Maurice Jamall: Heinle Cengage’s Foundations Reading Library. For those of you who want to know more about the topic of this podcast, here are a couple of nice readings: First, a text by Rob Waring on the art of writing graded readers. https://www.er-central.com/authors/writing-a-graded-reader/writing-graded-readers-rob-waring/ Second, an article by Stuart McLean on the graded reader collection we discuss in the interview. http://jalt-publications.org/content/index.php/jer/article/view/5 Note: we recorded this episode before this week’s horrible floods in Japan and feel a little embarrassed about how lightly we talk about the rain in the episode.

--2018 JUL 10
Comments
#22 The Foundations Reading Library. An interview with Rob Waring (part II)

#21: The mathematics of language scream at us. An interview with Rob Waring

Whenever we asked our guests for tips on who to interview next, Dr. Rob Waring’s name popped up almost immediately. When we asked Paul Goldberg, he told us that nobody made the case for extensive reading like he did, and that if you were in the same room with him and did not support extensive reading yet, he would be fast to make you change your mind about it. In this episode, which includes the first part of our interview, Dr. Waring tells us about his experiences with ER, including the first ER colloquium in 1997 and the creation of the ER Foundation. He also tells us about how vocabulary research shows that there is a no other way but to do extensive reading if our students are to learn the many words and lexical units they need to learn the target L2. Here’s a link to an article by Dr. Waring whose title says it all: The inescapable case for extensive reading. [insert link: http://www.robwaring.org/er/what_and_why/er_is_vital.htm]

--2018 JUL 3
Comments
#21: The mathematics of language scream at us. An interview with Rob Waring

#20 Chinese Graded Readers and ER in Chinese

After a long break that we took following the beginning of the academic year in Japan, we are back with a new episode and a new interview. This time we deal with extensive reading in Chinese. We do so in the company of Chinese language consultants Jared Turner and John Pasden, who have put together a collection of graded readers in Chinese called Mandarin Companion. In the interview they discuss their experiences reading and doing extensive reading in Chinese, and also the challenges of creating Chinese reading materials that are both interesting and useful to learners of the language.

--2018 JUN 19
Comments
#20 Chinese Graded Readers and ER in Chinese

#19: Cheating in extensive reading programmes

For our nineteenth episode we have an interview with professors Naeko Naganuma and Patrick Daugherty, from Akita International University, in the north of Japan. In the interview they tell us about the research that they have recently carried out on academic dishonesty in extensive reading programmes and they suggest a number of ways in which teachers can discourage cheating while making the student’ extensive reading more engaging and rewarding.

--2018 MAR 19
Comments
#19: Cheating in extensive reading programmes

#18: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part II)

In the second part of the interview, Professor Nation discusses different ways of doing extensive reading depending on whether one’s target is more fluency or vocabulary oriented, the need to make sure that the students know the reasons why they should be doing ER, the amount of reading that students ought to do, questions of vocabulary and frequency, and of course, the role of output in language acquisition and learning.

--2018 MAR 10
Comments
#18: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part II)

#17: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part I)

Professor Paul Nation, our guest for this and the following episode, needs no introduction. His name has been recurrently popping up in previous shows, mostly in discussions about the role of extensive reading within language teaching in general. In this first part of the interview he discusses just that: his ‘four strands’ approach to language teaching, and also their implications for the way we understand teachers’ roles and extensive reading. In the context of this discussion, Professor Nation also comments on Professor Akio Furukawa’s celebrated ER programme, and on the role of speed reading courses to improve reading fluency.

--2018 MAR 4
Comments
#17: ER and the Four Strands. Interview with Paul Nation (Part I)
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