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The goop Podcast

Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

1.4K
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The goop Podcast

The goop Podcast

Goop, Inc. and Cadence13

1.4K
Followers
16.2K
Plays
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About Us

Gwyneth Paltrow and goop's Chief Content Officer Elise Loehnen chat with leading thinkers, culture changers, and industry disruptors—from doctors to creatives, CEOs to spiritual healers—about shifting old paradigms and starting new conversations.

Latest Episodes

A Different Way to Live Virtuously

“Each of us, in our own infinite precious particularity, will be led to what’s to be done next in our own time and space,” says Cynthia Bourgeault. The modern-day mysticandEpiscopal priestis the author of several brilliant books, includingEyeof the Heart: A Spiritual Journey into the Imaginal Realm. Today, she joinsusto discuss a question that comes forth for many of us at some point: Are we all just irrelevant specs? Does our life actually have meaning? According to Bourgeault, while humans are not the center of everything, our actions have profound influence on the well-being of the planet(and a system that extends beyond it). She says that a lack of consciousness has led to much of the mess we’re currently in,andsheexplains how we all play a particular role in amending the damage. She talks through how our fear of dying is problematic(and what a different approach to death could look like), what it truly means to live virtuously, and whether or not she’s hopeful for the future.(Spoiler:Mostly, she is.)(Formore, seeThegoopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

50 min4 d ago
Comments
A Different Way to Live Virtuously

Gwyneth Paltrow x Jay Shetty: What Happens When You Spend Time with Yourself?

Jay Shetty, author of the new bookThink Like a Monk, is in part known as a former monk. Now, he serves as a coach, helping people identify and live out their purpose. He joined GP to talk about why many of us have never really spent time by ourselves, with ourselves—and what can happen when we do. Shetty has a different way of thinking about compassion for self and compassion for others; and it involves not devaluing or belittling pain. He also has a clarifying way of looking at the fine line between compassion and victimhood (so that we don’t get stuck in victim consciousness) and distinguishing feelings (which can be fleeting and misleading) from emotions.(Formore, seeThegoopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

53 min6 d ago
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Jay Shetty: What Happens When You Spend Time with Yourself?

Proving Ourselves into Existence

“I grew up with this intense fear of failure,” says Cathy Park Hong. “And in retrospect, I can understand why my parents instilled that in me—because for them, there was no safety net.” Hong is a writer,aprofessor at Rutgers-Newark University, and the author ofMinor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning. It’s a book about family, identity, culture, and self-worth. Hong joins us today to talk about the parts of the Asian American experience that are often left out of the mainstream. She talks about how becoming a parent forced her to reckon with her own upbringing and the complicated nature of assimilation—both what it afforded her and what it stole from her. She asks: How do we go about the messy process of deciding which parts of our culture to pull forward to keep in our lives and which to put down?(Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

42 min1 w ago
Comments
Proving Ourselves into Existence

What Makes a Good Apology?

“There is so much hurt that doesn’t have to remain unhealed,” says Molly Howes, PhD. “A good apology can go the distance to lessen that pain.” Howes is a Harvard-trained clinical psychologist andtheauthor ofA Good Apology: Four Steps to Make Things Right. Many of us are bad at apologizing, which according to Howes, is not for lack of care, butbecausewe may have a misunderstanding of what it takes to make both parties feel whole. Howes says a good apology requires listening rather than justifying, which is often easier said than done. Today, Howes walks us through the four steps of a good apology and explains how we can apply these steps personally in our own homes and more widely in our communities. (Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

46 min1 w ago
Comments
What Makes a Good Apology?

The Downstream Impact of ignoring Environmental Health

“Most of the diseases that we experience are not inevitable,” says Bruce Lanphear, MD. “They’re preventable.” Lanphear is a clinician scientist at the Child & Family Research Institute, BC Children’s Hospital, andaprofessor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.He’s spent the majority of his career exploring how environmental factors like toxic chemicals, pollutants, and contaminants can impact our health. Today, he explains the challenges of proving causation, the ways industries dodge responsibility, and why health care policy and research funding often don’t reflect the needs and priorities of doctors and patients. (While there’s plenty of evidence showing that most diseases are preventable,the USspends only 4 percent of funding on upstream preventive measures.) Lanphear breaks down where we’re most vulnerable and what we can do about it. (Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adch...

46 min2 w ago
Comments
The Downstream Impact of ignoring Environmental Health

Can We Create Our Own Good Luck?

We often view moments of serendipity, or happy accidents, as situations that we play no part in and can't control or influence. But author Christian Busch, PhD,believes that luck may not always be circumstantial—and that bytrainingourselves to see something in the unexpected, we canmake those accidents more meaningful.Which is the subject of his book,The Serendipity Mindset: The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck. Busch is the director of the Global Economy Program at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs and also teaches at the London School of Economics. Today, he joins host Elise Loehnen to discuss how we can best exercise our serendipity muscle and whether or not extroverts have a leg upin the game.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

38 min2 w ago
Comments
Can We Create Our Own Good Luck?

Finding Meaning in Transition

You’ve probablybeen fed the myth thatyour life will generallyfollow a linear path, with maybe a midlife crisis and a few other upheavals thrown in along the way.Butinreality, you’ve probably experienced more big transitions, or“lifequakes,”as author Bruce Feiler calls them. For his bookLife Isinthe Transitions,Feilerspent a year exploring how people move through these moments.What he learned isthatalthough thechanges can be unpredictable, there are patterns to be found in how we cope with them. And with the right tools, we can navigate these transitions with meaning, purpose, and skill.Feiler joins host Elise Loehnen to talk through his different strategies for surviving a massive life change and making the most of opportunities to grow.(For more, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

40 min3 w ago
Comments
Finding Meaning in Transition

When Friends Matter Too Much

Gordon Neufeld isa developmental psychologist and the author ofHold On to Your Kids: Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers. In his forty-plus years studying child development, a few common threads have emerged. According to Neufeld, parents tend to be hyperfocused on socializing their childrenin orderfor them to be wellliked and have plenty of friends.This good intention can cause children tobecomepeer-attached—meaning theylook to their peers instead of the adults in their lives for guidance, care, and stability.Having close peers is important, but the peer relationship shouldn’t be themost importantone, says Neufeld. His work helps parents and caretakers maintain and strengthen relationships with their children, recognize when kids are pulling away, andreverse damage that’s already been doneto the bond. His approach does not require us to do everything “right”—but it could shift the way we raise and relate to children for the better.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

43 min3 w ago
Comments
When Friends Matter Too Much

Gwyneth Paltrow x Cameron Diaz: What to Cut Loose

GP talks with her friend Cameron Diaz about the best part of turning forty, what affects our capacity to be intimate, taking responsibility for who you are, and the launch of Avaline, Diaz’s organic wine line. Diaz explains why she pivoted away from her acting career, what happened after she decided to start over, and how she learned a surprising amount about herself in the early days of her relationship with her husband. “In my forties, I realized I need to be quicker to identify the things I shouldn’t be holding on to, and cut them loose,” says Diaz. The tail end of the conversation is about motherhood—and what Diaz most wants for her daughter.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

39 minAUG 20
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Cameron Diaz: What to Cut Loose

The Science Behind Spontaneous Healing

In the medical community, miraculous recoveriesare typically dismissed as flukes and outliers. Because they can’t be explained within the constructs of typical modern care, they end up in the dustbin. But some doctors, like today’s guest Jeffrey Rediger, MD, believe that this is a grave mistake and that our insistence on clinging to old systems and beliefs leaves much lifesaving science out. Rediger, who is on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and is the director of McLean Hospital SE, has spent the past two decades studying verified cases of spontaneous remission, looking for unifying threads that might be repeatable for others with the same diagnosis. In his book,Cured: The Life Changing Science of Spontaneous Healing,he shares his beautiful insights and discoveries. He joins host Elise Loehnen to discuss the root cause of illness, how our environment sets the stage for healing, and the pillars associated with recoveryand overall well-being—including nutrition,theimmune sys...

45 minAUG 18
Comments
The Science Behind Spontaneous Healing

Latest Episodes

A Different Way to Live Virtuously

“Each of us, in our own infinite precious particularity, will be led to what’s to be done next in our own time and space,” says Cynthia Bourgeault. The modern-day mysticandEpiscopal priestis the author of several brilliant books, includingEyeof the Heart: A Spiritual Journey into the Imaginal Realm. Today, she joinsusto discuss a question that comes forth for many of us at some point: Are we all just irrelevant specs? Does our life actually have meaning? According to Bourgeault, while humans are not the center of everything, our actions have profound influence on the well-being of the planet(and a system that extends beyond it). She says that a lack of consciousness has led to much of the mess we’re currently in,andsheexplains how we all play a particular role in amending the damage. She talks through how our fear of dying is problematic(and what a different approach to death could look like), what it truly means to live virtuously, and whether or not she’s hopeful for the future.(Spoiler:Mostly, she is.)(Formore, seeThegoopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

50 min4 d ago
Comments
A Different Way to Live Virtuously

Gwyneth Paltrow x Jay Shetty: What Happens When You Spend Time with Yourself?

Jay Shetty, author of the new bookThink Like a Monk, is in part known as a former monk. Now, he serves as a coach, helping people identify and live out their purpose. He joined GP to talk about why many of us have never really spent time by ourselves, with ourselves—and what can happen when we do. Shetty has a different way of thinking about compassion for self and compassion for others; and it involves not devaluing or belittling pain. He also has a clarifying way of looking at the fine line between compassion and victimhood (so that we don’t get stuck in victim consciousness) and distinguishing feelings (which can be fleeting and misleading) from emotions.(Formore, seeThegoopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

53 min6 d ago
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Jay Shetty: What Happens When You Spend Time with Yourself?

Proving Ourselves into Existence

“I grew up with this intense fear of failure,” says Cathy Park Hong. “And in retrospect, I can understand why my parents instilled that in me—because for them, there was no safety net.” Hong is a writer,aprofessor at Rutgers-Newark University, and the author ofMinor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning. It’s a book about family, identity, culture, and self-worth. Hong joins us today to talk about the parts of the Asian American experience that are often left out of the mainstream. She talks about how becoming a parent forced her to reckon with her own upbringing and the complicated nature of assimilation—both what it afforded her and what it stole from her. She asks: How do we go about the messy process of deciding which parts of our culture to pull forward to keep in our lives and which to put down?(Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

42 min1 w ago
Comments
Proving Ourselves into Existence

What Makes a Good Apology?

“There is so much hurt that doesn’t have to remain unhealed,” says Molly Howes, PhD. “A good apology can go the distance to lessen that pain.” Howes is a Harvard-trained clinical psychologist andtheauthor ofA Good Apology: Four Steps to Make Things Right. Many of us are bad at apologizing, which according to Howes, is not for lack of care, butbecausewe may have a misunderstanding of what it takes to make both parties feel whole. Howes says a good apology requires listening rather than justifying, which is often easier said than done. Today, Howes walks us through the four steps of a good apology and explains how we can apply these steps personally in our own homes and more widely in our communities. (Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

46 min1 w ago
Comments
What Makes a Good Apology?

The Downstream Impact of ignoring Environmental Health

“Most of the diseases that we experience are not inevitable,” says Bruce Lanphear, MD. “They’re preventable.” Lanphear is a clinician scientist at the Child & Family Research Institute, BC Children’s Hospital, andaprofessor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver.He’s spent the majority of his career exploring how environmental factors like toxic chemicals, pollutants, and contaminants can impact our health. Today, he explains the challenges of proving causation, the ways industries dodge responsibility, and why health care policy and research funding often don’t reflect the needs and priorities of doctors and patients. (While there’s plenty of evidence showing that most diseases are preventable,the USspends only 4 percent of funding on upstream preventive measures.) Lanphear breaks down where we’re most vulnerable and what we can do about it. (Formore, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adch...

46 min2 w ago
Comments
The Downstream Impact of ignoring Environmental Health

Can We Create Our Own Good Luck?

We often view moments of serendipity, or happy accidents, as situations that we play no part in and can't control or influence. But author Christian Busch, PhD,believes that luck may not always be circumstantial—and that bytrainingourselves to see something in the unexpected, we canmake those accidents more meaningful.Which is the subject of his book,The Serendipity Mindset: The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck. Busch is the director of the Global Economy Program at New York University’s Center for Global Affairs and also teaches at the London School of Economics. Today, he joins host Elise Loehnen to discuss how we can best exercise our serendipity muscle and whether or not extroverts have a leg upin the game.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

38 min2 w ago
Comments
Can We Create Our Own Good Luck?

Finding Meaning in Transition

You’ve probablybeen fed the myth thatyour life will generallyfollow a linear path, with maybe a midlife crisis and a few other upheavals thrown in along the way.Butinreality, you’ve probably experienced more big transitions, or“lifequakes,”as author Bruce Feiler calls them. For his bookLife Isinthe Transitions,Feilerspent a year exploring how people move through these moments.What he learned isthatalthough thechanges can be unpredictable, there are patterns to be found in how we cope with them. And with the right tools, we can navigate these transitions with meaning, purpose, and skill.Feiler joins host Elise Loehnen to talk through his different strategies for surviving a massive life change and making the most of opportunities to grow.(For more, seeThe goopPodcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

40 min3 w ago
Comments
Finding Meaning in Transition

When Friends Matter Too Much

Gordon Neufeld isa developmental psychologist and the author ofHold On to Your Kids: Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers. In his forty-plus years studying child development, a few common threads have emerged. According to Neufeld, parents tend to be hyperfocused on socializing their childrenin orderfor them to be wellliked and have plenty of friends.This good intention can cause children tobecomepeer-attached—meaning theylook to their peers instead of the adults in their lives for guidance, care, and stability.Having close peers is important, but the peer relationship shouldn’t be themost importantone, says Neufeld. His work helps parents and caretakers maintain and strengthen relationships with their children, recognize when kids are pulling away, andreverse damage that’s already been doneto the bond. His approach does not require us to do everything “right”—but it could shift the way we raise and relate to children for the better.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

43 min3 w ago
Comments
When Friends Matter Too Much

Gwyneth Paltrow x Cameron Diaz: What to Cut Loose

GP talks with her friend Cameron Diaz about the best part of turning forty, what affects our capacity to be intimate, taking responsibility for who you are, and the launch of Avaline, Diaz’s organic wine line. Diaz explains why she pivoted away from her acting career, what happened after she decided to start over, and how she learned a surprising amount about herself in the early days of her relationship with her husband. “In my forties, I realized I need to be quicker to identify the things I shouldn’t be holding on to, and cut them loose,” says Diaz. The tail end of the conversation is about motherhood—and what Diaz most wants for her daughter.(For more, seeThe goop Podcasthub.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

39 minAUG 20
Comments
Gwyneth Paltrow x Cameron Diaz: What to Cut Loose

The Science Behind Spontaneous Healing

In the medical community, miraculous recoveriesare typically dismissed as flukes and outliers. Because they can’t be explained within the constructs of typical modern care, they end up in the dustbin. But some doctors, like today’s guest Jeffrey Rediger, MD, believe that this is a grave mistake and that our insistence on clinging to old systems and beliefs leaves much lifesaving science out. Rediger, who is on the faculty at Harvard Medical School and is the director of McLean Hospital SE, has spent the past two decades studying verified cases of spontaneous remission, looking for unifying threads that might be repeatable for others with the same diagnosis. In his book,Cured: The Life Changing Science of Spontaneous Healing,he shares his beautiful insights and discoveries. He joins host Elise Loehnen to discuss the root cause of illness, how our environment sets the stage for healing, and the pillars associated with recoveryand overall well-being—including nutrition,theimmune sys...

45 minAUG 18
Comments
The Science Behind Spontaneous Healing
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