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Reflecting History

Reflecting History

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Plays
Reflecting History

Reflecting History

Reflecting History

20
Followers
117
Plays
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About Us

Reflecting History is an educational history podcast that explores significant historical events and themes without losing track of the ordinary people involved. Covering a wide variety of topics, it is a narrative driven podcast that delves into the connection between history, psychology, and philosophy on a personal level.

Latest Episodes

This is Water

As David Foster Wallace points out in his famous commencement address "This is Water," life is filled with simple realities that are difficult to talk about or even comprehend. Upon close examination, sometimes these simple and boring platitudes can have deeper meanings that change the way we look at the world. From the purpose of education, to exercising control over what we think about, to the truths that hide in plain sight, David Foster Wallace makes an argument for living an examined life that could change the way we look at the world around us, and the world that came before us. Check out the speech here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CrOL-ydFMI Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

28 MIN1 w ago
Comments
This is Water

The Allegory of the Cave and Simulation Theory

The Allegory of the Cave from the ancient Greek philosopher Plato is one of the oldest and most discussed philosophical works in history. Prisoners are chained up in a cave, thinking the shadows they see on the wall in front of them represent all that reality has to offer. Plato's cave has obvious parallels to a modern world in which people seemingly live in the same world, but a different reality. The Cave also has much to tell us about truth, knowledge, and what it means to live a good life. But it also asks an ancient philosophical question: how do we know we aren't living in a simulation? If we are living in a simulation version of Plato's cave, how do we escape? What if we can't? What would that mean for the way we live life and the way we view the world? Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

32 MINMAR 3
Comments
The Allegory of the Cave and Simulation Theory

Did Hitler Fix the German Economy?

Economic history is notoriously complex and difficult to gain insight from. Nazi history is notoriously complex and strangely enough it seems many ignore the lessons that should be gleaned. Combine these two realities and the result is a Nazi economic history that is controversial and potentially misleading. Some have claimed in recent years that while not wanting to condone Hitler's atrocities, he did help to fix the German economy after the Depression. Does this claim that Hitler "fixed" the German economy hold any water? Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

44 MINFEB 11
Comments
Did Hitler Fix the German Economy?

The Bosnian War Part VII-The Women of Srebrenica

In the aftermath of the Bosnian Genocide, oral historian Selma Leydesdorff interviewed the female survivors of the tragedy. She was able to discover and document the strength and determination that each survivor of catastrophe possesses. The women of Srebrenica tell incredible tales of life before the war, life as a refugee, the experience of being part of an ethnic cleansing campaign, and of course the psychological burdens of surviving genocide. But hidden inside the deep memories is an important historical principle: the importance of remembering. This is the final episode in a series on the Bosnian War. Thanks for listening. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

54 MINJAN 21
Comments
The Bosnian War Part VII-The Women of Srebrenica

The Bosnian War Part VI-Safe Area Gorazde

The town of Gorazde in eastern Bosnia was promised protection from ethnic cleansing. In the midst of mass murder, violence, and chaos, the United Nations designated Gorazde, Srebrenica, and other locations as "safe areas." Refugees and victims of ethnic cleansing flocked to these areas for safety and protection. The people of these towns celebrated, thinking their suffering was finally over. But words are wind. When the time came for victims to call for help, they were answered with the worst reply of all: silence. This is part six in a series on the Bosnian War. The final episode will focus on the survivors of the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

48 MIN2019 DEC 31
Comments
The Bosnian War Part VI-Safe Area Gorazde

The Bosnian War Part V-Forgiveness

The Bosnian War is known historically for it's vicious cruelty. Ancient hatreds and the impact they had on the people of Bosnia are often used as a primary explanation for the conflict.Kenan Trebincevic was a survivor of the war, wracked by hatred and anger. After escaping his homeland to America, he made a visit to Bosnia years later to face down his past and get vengeance for what he and his family were made to go through. On his journey home, he discovered perhaps a more powerful force than vengeance: forgiveness.Why is forgiveness important? Why is the process of forgiveness so difficult? Is it worthwhile? This is part five in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter:...

36 MIN2019 DEC 10
Comments
The Bosnian War Part V-Forgiveness

The Bosnian War Part IV-War Journalism and The Tolerance Paradox

As Bosnia was torn asunder by war and destruction, a newspaper known asOslobodjenje endured the heat of the Siege of Sarajevo and gained worldwide recognition for it's reporting and it's ability to continue publishing papers in a war zone. Their building was destroyed, their supplies were minimal, and their people were killed, but somehow the paper endured. The reporters atOslobodjenje provided a valuable service to the community by keeping the people informed of big picture events in the war, but also keeping up with the daily tragedy that was life in Sarajevo. In addition to struggling for their lives, editors and reporters struggled with journalistic questions of objectivity, bias, and emphasis. Should you report everything that comes across your desk during a war? What if it gives the other side an advantage? Should you make an extra effort to be fair in your reporting to people who are actively trying to kill you? What's more important: journalistic integrity or survival? The e...

28 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
The Bosnian War Part IV-War Journalism and The Tolerance Paradox

The American Civil War with S.C. Gwynne

For this episode, I sat down with author and historian S.C. Gwynne to discuss the American Civil War and his latest book, "Hymns of the Republic." We talked about Lincoln's opinions on slavery, the causes of the Civil War, why many refuse to see slavery as the primary cause of the war, the African-American experience during the war, medical disasters during the war and the role of Clara Barton, the brutality of the war for the common soldier, the critical election of 1864, how we should think about the morality of the war, the legacy of the Civil War and modern day parallels, among other topics. S.C. Gwynne is a best selling author of numerous history books, including his biography of Stonewall Jackson "Rebel Yell" and his look at the Comanche Indians and the American West in "Empire of the Summer Moon." He was won numerous awards and been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his writing. If you are wondering about Part IV of the Bosnian War series, it's coming next week! Support the ...

72 MIN2019 NOV 11
Comments
The American Civil War with S.C. Gwynne

The Bosnian War Part III-Hatred

Hatred is often given as the historical reason for wars and other nasty events throughout history. There was certainly plenty of it to go around in Bosnia during the 1990's, but how have historians been able to make sense of it? Why did neighbors, friends, and countrymen begin to turn on each other and do horrible things to each other? Is the best answer simply hatred? Or is there something deeper at play? It turns out psychological forces like cognitive dissonance may be able to explain some of these questions. This is part three in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on...

25 MIN2019 OCT 29
Comments
The Bosnian War Part III-Hatred

The Bosnian War Part II-The Siege of Sarajevo

For well over two years, Bosnian Serb forces bombarded Sarajevo in an attempt to destroy the city and break the spirit of the people who lived there. Thousands of civilians (including children) were killed in an attempt by Bosnian Serb forces to divide the city and stir ethnic hatred. People lived without food, running water, electricity, or heat. While survival became the priority for most ordinary people, their collective experience of surviving against the odds and standing up to a bully coalesced into something that will always be remembered. This is part two in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare,...

39 MIN2019 OCT 8
Comments
The Bosnian War Part II-The Siege of Sarajevo

Latest Episodes

This is Water

As David Foster Wallace points out in his famous commencement address "This is Water," life is filled with simple realities that are difficult to talk about or even comprehend. Upon close examination, sometimes these simple and boring platitudes can have deeper meanings that change the way we look at the world. From the purpose of education, to exercising control over what we think about, to the truths that hide in plain sight, David Foster Wallace makes an argument for living an examined life that could change the way we look at the world around us, and the world that came before us. Check out the speech here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CrOL-ydFMI Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

28 MIN1 w ago
Comments
This is Water

The Allegory of the Cave and Simulation Theory

The Allegory of the Cave from the ancient Greek philosopher Plato is one of the oldest and most discussed philosophical works in history. Prisoners are chained up in a cave, thinking the shadows they see on the wall in front of them represent all that reality has to offer. Plato's cave has obvious parallels to a modern world in which people seemingly live in the same world, but a different reality. The Cave also has much to tell us about truth, knowledge, and what it means to live a good life. But it also asks an ancient philosophical question: how do we know we aren't living in a simulation? If we are living in a simulation version of Plato's cave, how do we escape? What if we can't? What would that mean for the way we live life and the way we view the world? Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

32 MINMAR 3
Comments
The Allegory of the Cave and Simulation Theory

Did Hitler Fix the German Economy?

Economic history is notoriously complex and difficult to gain insight from. Nazi history is notoriously complex and strangely enough it seems many ignore the lessons that should be gleaned. Combine these two realities and the result is a Nazi economic history that is controversial and potentially misleading. Some have claimed in recent years that while not wanting to condone Hitler's atrocities, he did help to fix the German economy after the Depression. Does this claim that Hitler "fixed" the German economy hold any water? Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

44 MINFEB 11
Comments
Did Hitler Fix the German Economy?

The Bosnian War Part VII-The Women of Srebrenica

In the aftermath of the Bosnian Genocide, oral historian Selma Leydesdorff interviewed the female survivors of the tragedy. She was able to discover and document the strength and determination that each survivor of catastrophe possesses. The women of Srebrenica tell incredible tales of life before the war, life as a refugee, the experience of being part of an ethnic cleansing campaign, and of course the psychological burdens of surviving genocide. But hidden inside the deep memories is an important historical principle: the importance of remembering. This is the final episode in a series on the Bosnian War. Thanks for listening. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

54 MINJAN 21
Comments
The Bosnian War Part VII-The Women of Srebrenica

The Bosnian War Part VI-Safe Area Gorazde

The town of Gorazde in eastern Bosnia was promised protection from ethnic cleansing. In the midst of mass murder, violence, and chaos, the United Nations designated Gorazde, Srebrenica, and other locations as "safe areas." Refugees and victims of ethnic cleansing flocked to these areas for safety and protection. The people of these towns celebrated, thinking their suffering was finally over. But words are wind. When the time came for victims to call for help, they were answered with the worst reply of all: silence. This is part six in a series on the Bosnian War. The final episode will focus on the survivors of the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts...It helps!

48 MIN2019 DEC 31
Comments
The Bosnian War Part VI-Safe Area Gorazde

The Bosnian War Part V-Forgiveness

The Bosnian War is known historically for it's vicious cruelty. Ancient hatreds and the impact they had on the people of Bosnia are often used as a primary explanation for the conflict.Kenan Trebincevic was a survivor of the war, wracked by hatred and anger. After escaping his homeland to America, he made a visit to Bosnia years later to face down his past and get vengeance for what he and his family were made to go through. On his journey home, he discovered perhaps a more powerful force than vengeance: forgiveness.Why is forgiveness important? Why is the process of forgiveness so difficult? Is it worthwhile? This is part five in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter:...

36 MIN2019 DEC 10
Comments
The Bosnian War Part V-Forgiveness

The Bosnian War Part IV-War Journalism and The Tolerance Paradox

As Bosnia was torn asunder by war and destruction, a newspaper known asOslobodjenje endured the heat of the Siege of Sarajevo and gained worldwide recognition for it's reporting and it's ability to continue publishing papers in a war zone. Their building was destroyed, their supplies were minimal, and their people were killed, but somehow the paper endured. The reporters atOslobodjenje provided a valuable service to the community by keeping the people informed of big picture events in the war, but also keeping up with the daily tragedy that was life in Sarajevo. In addition to struggling for their lives, editors and reporters struggled with journalistic questions of objectivity, bias, and emphasis. Should you report everything that comes across your desk during a war? What if it gives the other side an advantage? Should you make an extra effort to be fair in your reporting to people who are actively trying to kill you? What's more important: journalistic integrity or survival? The e...

28 MIN2019 NOV 19
Comments
The Bosnian War Part IV-War Journalism and The Tolerance Paradox

The American Civil War with S.C. Gwynne

For this episode, I sat down with author and historian S.C. Gwynne to discuss the American Civil War and his latest book, "Hymns of the Republic." We talked about Lincoln's opinions on slavery, the causes of the Civil War, why many refuse to see slavery as the primary cause of the war, the African-American experience during the war, medical disasters during the war and the role of Clara Barton, the brutality of the war for the common soldier, the critical election of 1864, how we should think about the morality of the war, the legacy of the Civil War and modern day parallels, among other topics. S.C. Gwynne is a best selling author of numerous history books, including his biography of Stonewall Jackson "Rebel Yell" and his look at the Comanche Indians and the American West in "Empire of the Summer Moon." He was won numerous awards and been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his writing. If you are wondering about Part IV of the Bosnian War series, it's coming next week! Support the ...

72 MIN2019 NOV 11
Comments
The American Civil War with S.C. Gwynne

The Bosnian War Part III-Hatred

Hatred is often given as the historical reason for wars and other nasty events throughout history. There was certainly plenty of it to go around in Bosnia during the 1990's, but how have historians been able to make sense of it? Why did neighbors, friends, and countrymen begin to turn on each other and do horrible things to each other? Is the best answer simply hatred? Or is there something deeper at play? It turns out psychological forces like cognitive dissonance may be able to explain some of these questions. This is part three in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare, consider leaving a review on...

25 MIN2019 OCT 29
Comments
The Bosnian War Part III-Hatred

The Bosnian War Part II-The Siege of Sarajevo

For well over two years, Bosnian Serb forces bombarded Sarajevo in an attempt to destroy the city and break the spirit of the people who lived there. Thousands of civilians (including children) were killed in an attempt by Bosnian Serb forces to divide the city and stir ethnic hatred. People lived without food, running water, electricity, or heat. While survival became the priority for most ordinary people, their collective experience of surviving against the odds and standing up to a bully coalesced into something that will always be remembered. This is part two in a series on the Bosnian War. Future episodes will cover different aspects of the conflict, including the role of journalism in the war, the role of United States foreign policy and the United Nations in the conflict, ethnic cleansing, and the Bosnian Genocide. Support the podcast: https://www.patreon.com/reflectinghistory Reflecting History on Twitter: @reflectinghist If you like the podcast and have 30 seconds to spare,...

39 MIN2019 OCT 8
Comments
The Bosnian War Part II-The Siege of Sarajevo

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