title

Hello PhD

Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz

16
Followers
77
Plays
Hello PhD

Hello PhD

Joshua Hall and Daniel Arneman, PhDz

16
Followers
77
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

A podcast for scientists, and the people who love them.

Latest Episodes

130. Coronavirus, and Life Outside the Lab

It has quickly become a new way of life – working from home, avoiding restaurants and gyms, and ‘social distancing’ from coworkers, friends, and even family. The upending of normal routines happened so quickly, and the days have become so blurred together, that it’s hard to keep track of just how long we’ve been confined to our apartments and homes. We know that scientists and doctors at the NIH, CDC, virology labs, and hospitals around the world continue their front-lines fight to understand and treat the pandemic, and we are deeply grateful. But what about all the other scientists? The research faculty, postdocs, grad students, and technicians whose research doesn’t cover RNA viruses or epidemiology? Even though they are not working directly on understanding COVID-19, they still have important experiments to do. They have cell cultures, fruit fly lines, and mouse colonies to maintain. The have classes to teach or take, dissertations to write, and theses to defend. What happens to them when the University closes, and experiments are forbidden? This week, we catch up with those scientists, to understand how they are adapting to life and science in a pandemic.

51 MIN2 d ago
Comments
130. Coronavirus, and Life Outside the Lab

129. Grad School Rejection: Why it Happens and How to Get Accepted

I feel a little disheartened because I’ve been rejected from many of the places I applied to and haven’t heard back from a number of others. Is it worth it to hold out hope for the ones that haven’t sent out updates? I have been rejected from 5 schools and am expecting 3 more rejections soon enough without any invitations for interview. I’ve had my time in regret and disappointment and I’m now thinking about what to do next. Should I just give up at the thought of me obtaining a PhD? I feel like a mess right now. These excerpts are from just three of the many messages we received this year from grad school applicants who were moving through the stages of rejection grief. Some understood it would be an uphill climb, and half-expected the bad news. For others, it was a surprise because they had followed all the advice on how to craft the perfect application. For everyone, it was disappointing, demoralizing, and confusing – what can I do if I’ve been pushed off the only path I k...

56 MIN2 w ago
Comments
129. Grad School Rejection: Why it Happens and How to Get Accepted

Field Work: Science in the Great Outdoors

It’s 6 AM and you wake up as the crickets grow quiet and dawn illuminates your tent. After cooking breakfast over a campfire, you load a backpack and hike seven miles into a canyon. That’s when the science begins… Camp, Sample… When people think of science, they often conjure images of lab coats, chalk boards, and beaker-lined shelves. But for field scientists, the lab looks less like a soapstone bench and more like a frosty taiga, steamy rainforest, or bubbling hot-spring. This week, we talk with Vince Debes, a field-work researcher who studies extremophiles in Yellowstone National Park. Vince Debes, pictured here ‘in the lab.’ He explains his research, including why sampling hot springs helps his lab understand which organisms will ‘come to the table’ given the chemicals and compounds available in the soup. We also learn about what it takes to plan and execute a research program in the field, where weather, broken equipment, and wild animals can interrupt and alter your re...

51 MINFEB. 26
Comments
Field Work: Science in the Great Outdoors

127. Listener Mailbag: How Do You Stay Motivated in Grad School?

It’s a well worn analogy, but an apt one: grad school is a mental and emotional marathon, not a sprint. This week, we answer listener mail from ‘runners’ at different stages of the race! This episode is Part 2 of our conversation with Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com. You can listen to the first episode here: 126: Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris Finishing Strong We begin near the end with Katie, who is really feeling the pain with the finish line in sight. It’s that time when you start to wonder why you got into this race in the first place! Katie asks: How do you let go of your proposed PhD plan, and breath life/love into wherever it’s going now, which feels like you’re scraping up the dirt on the floor and mushing it into the vague resemblance of a thesis? We cheer her on, and let her know that EVERYONE feels that way near the end of grad school. The key is to keep pushing over the finish line and be done with it. You’ll hav...

38 MINFEB. 11
Comments
127. Listener Mailbag: How Do You Stay Motivated in Grad School?

126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris

It’s that time again – the virtual mail bag is overflowing, so we invited Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com to help us answer YOUR emails, Tweets, and messages. Bringing the Heat We start with a few burning questions about applications and interviews. The first question comes from a listener who was promised a strong letter of recommendation by research PI, but when the application period rolled around, the PI was ‘too busy’ to write the letter. What should I do when I can’t get ahold of the PI? Maybe he is purposely ghosting me… How do I explain this situation without sounding like I am bad mouthing the PI if I get asked about this? Please help. Susanna, Josh, and Daniel spend some time describing why those letters of recommendation are so important, and lay out plans A, B, and C for what to do when the PI just won’t deliver. Next, we hear from a listener who is embarking on her first interviews, and wants to know what to wear! I have received my first interview invitations f...

34 MINENE. 24
Comments
126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris

106. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Acing Your Interview with Dr. Beth Bowman (R)

See our previous episodes in this series: * 101: HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Knowing When, and Where, to Apply with Dr. Beth Bowman* 102: HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement with Dr. Brian Rybarczyk With most jobs, you’ll need to submit a polished resume along with a handful of ebullient references. Maybe you’ll pass through a phone-screen with HR and then spend 20 minutes with the hiring manager. To get into grad school, the interview process will take days. Grad school interviews often start with a flight to a new city. You’ll have a casual chat with the grad student assigned to retrieve you from the airport, then meet the fellow candidate with whom you’ll share a hotel room. The moment you get settled, you’re off to dinner with some faculty, followed by an early bedtime. That’s because tomorrow morning, you’ll pass through a series of orientation sessions, faculty interviews, a tour of the city, and finall...

72 MINENE. 5
Comments
106. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Acing Your Interview with Dr. Beth Bowman (R)

125. Demystifying the Research Institute

Most PhD students attend traditional academic institutions of higher educations. It’s the world of classes, campuses, and mortarboards you probably think of when you think about a University. But there’s a less-traveled path to a PhD that may actually hold some benefits for certain students, including those coming back to school after working for awhile, or those with families. We’re talking about research institutes, and it’s possible you’ve never even heard about this alternative path to a PhD. Research on the Brink Research institutes may not be on every student’s radar. Though there are several varieties, most research institutes exist as hybrids – not quite academic, but not quite industry. Not quite public, but not quite private either. Of the 10,000-15,000 research institutes in the United States, many were formed either to explore specific topics (agriculture, defense, or energy) or to bridge the gap between the lab and the wider world. These bridge-focused institutes...

33 MIN2019 DIC. 16
Comments
125. Demystifying the Research Institute

124. An Art Contest JUST For Hello PhD Listeners

We’re bringing you this bonus episode to encourage our listeners to submit their artwork to the Promega Art Contest for Creative Scientists. This isn’t for everyone – it’s just for listeners of Hello PhD! The deadline is nearly here (December 1st, 2019), but you can still visit the contest page to submit a digital image of your fine artwork, photography, microscopy, or whatever! Five winners will receive prizes by mail and have their art on display at the Promega Employee Art Showcase. One Grand Prize Winner will win a free trip to the Art Show opening in Madison Wisconsin! We called Dr. Aparna Shah, who was last year’s grand-prize winner. Her submission, “an image of an immuno-histochemically stained mouse brain slice acquired on a confocal microscope” came from a project she had since abandoned. Thankfully, that image was still a winner. You can read all about her experience here: Oh, the Places You’ll Go, Thanks to Science! So don’t wait! Submit your images today!

9 MIN2019 NOV. 27
Comments
124. An Art Contest JUST For Hello PhD Listeners

123. Anatomy of a Micropublication feat. Nate Jacobs of Flashpub

In a world where it’s “Publish or Perish,” you’d expect “publish” to be the more favorable option. But, if you’ve ever spent a year or more performing experiments, crafting figures, writing a manuscript, finding a friendly editor and arguing with reviewers, that “perish” option might just sound pretty sweet right about now…. It’s no secret that the publishing industry has an inexplicable choke-hold on the scientific community. A handful of companies exercise editorial control, deciding which findings are permitted to enter the information stream. They charge the researcher who submits the paper, then charge exorbitant fees to the reader to see what was ‘printed.’ While the information age has flooded nearly every aspect of our daily lives, its transformative power sometimes seems to be walled off at the laboratory door. Luckily, there are a few scientists who are willing to chip away at that wall. Minimum Viable Publication Nate Jacobs wasn’t far into his postdoctoral ...

56 MIN2019 NOV. 15
Comments
123. Anatomy of a Micropublication feat. Nate Jacobs of Flashpub

102. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement (R)

Please recount your life story, all of your future plans, and why this graduate program is uniquely suited to fulfill those dreams. Limit your answer to 140 characters. Okay, okay, the typical “Personal Statement” prompt on your grad school application is probably not that outrageous, but they CAN feel both cryptic and overwhelming. Here’s a real prompt from a real grad school application at a major university: In 1-2 pages, describe your career goals, research interests, past and present research experience, and why you’ve chosen the [Name Redacted] Program for your graduate studies. This prompt can induce instant writer’s block in even the most prepared applicants. So where do you begin? This week on the show, we share tips for crafting the perfect personal statement that will highlight your grad-school-readiness and potential for greatness in a career beyond the degree. Anatomy of an Application The typical graduate school application has four main parts: * Transcripts* Test...

64 MIN2019 OCT. 30
Comments
102. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement (R)

Latest Episodes

130. Coronavirus, and Life Outside the Lab

It has quickly become a new way of life – working from home, avoiding restaurants and gyms, and ‘social distancing’ from coworkers, friends, and even family. The upending of normal routines happened so quickly, and the days have become so blurred together, that it’s hard to keep track of just how long we’ve been confined to our apartments and homes. We know that scientists and doctors at the NIH, CDC, virology labs, and hospitals around the world continue their front-lines fight to understand and treat the pandemic, and we are deeply grateful. But what about all the other scientists? The research faculty, postdocs, grad students, and technicians whose research doesn’t cover RNA viruses or epidemiology? Even though they are not working directly on understanding COVID-19, they still have important experiments to do. They have cell cultures, fruit fly lines, and mouse colonies to maintain. The have classes to teach or take, dissertations to write, and theses to defend. What happens to them when the University closes, and experiments are forbidden? This week, we catch up with those scientists, to understand how they are adapting to life and science in a pandemic.

51 MIN2 d ago
Comments
130. Coronavirus, and Life Outside the Lab

129. Grad School Rejection: Why it Happens and How to Get Accepted

I feel a little disheartened because I’ve been rejected from many of the places I applied to and haven’t heard back from a number of others. Is it worth it to hold out hope for the ones that haven’t sent out updates? I have been rejected from 5 schools and am expecting 3 more rejections soon enough without any invitations for interview. I’ve had my time in regret and disappointment and I’m now thinking about what to do next. Should I just give up at the thought of me obtaining a PhD? I feel like a mess right now. These excerpts are from just three of the many messages we received this year from grad school applicants who were moving through the stages of rejection grief. Some understood it would be an uphill climb, and half-expected the bad news. For others, it was a surprise because they had followed all the advice on how to craft the perfect application. For everyone, it was disappointing, demoralizing, and confusing – what can I do if I’ve been pushed off the only path I k...

56 MIN2 w ago
Comments
129. Grad School Rejection: Why it Happens and How to Get Accepted

Field Work: Science in the Great Outdoors

It’s 6 AM and you wake up as the crickets grow quiet and dawn illuminates your tent. After cooking breakfast over a campfire, you load a backpack and hike seven miles into a canyon. That’s when the science begins… Camp, Sample… When people think of science, they often conjure images of lab coats, chalk boards, and beaker-lined shelves. But for field scientists, the lab looks less like a soapstone bench and more like a frosty taiga, steamy rainforest, or bubbling hot-spring. This week, we talk with Vince Debes, a field-work researcher who studies extremophiles in Yellowstone National Park. Vince Debes, pictured here ‘in the lab.’ He explains his research, including why sampling hot springs helps his lab understand which organisms will ‘come to the table’ given the chemicals and compounds available in the soup. We also learn about what it takes to plan and execute a research program in the field, where weather, broken equipment, and wild animals can interrupt and alter your re...

51 MINFEB. 26
Comments
Field Work: Science in the Great Outdoors

127. Listener Mailbag: How Do You Stay Motivated in Grad School?

It’s a well worn analogy, but an apt one: grad school is a mental and emotional marathon, not a sprint. This week, we answer listener mail from ‘runners’ at different stages of the race! This episode is Part 2 of our conversation with Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com. You can listen to the first episode here: 126: Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris Finishing Strong We begin near the end with Katie, who is really feeling the pain with the finish line in sight. It’s that time when you start to wonder why you got into this race in the first place! Katie asks: How do you let go of your proposed PhD plan, and breath life/love into wherever it’s going now, which feels like you’re scraping up the dirt on the floor and mushing it into the vague resemblance of a thesis? We cheer her on, and let her know that EVERYONE feels that way near the end of grad school. The key is to keep pushing over the finish line and be done with it. You’ll hav...

38 MINFEB. 11
Comments
127. Listener Mailbag: How Do You Stay Motivated in Grad School?

126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris

It’s that time again – the virtual mail bag is overflowing, so we invited Susanna Harris of PhDBalance.com to help us answer YOUR emails, Tweets, and messages. Bringing the Heat We start with a few burning questions about applications and interviews. The first question comes from a listener who was promised a strong letter of recommendation by research PI, but when the application period rolled around, the PI was ‘too busy’ to write the letter. What should I do when I can’t get ahold of the PI? Maybe he is purposely ghosting me… How do I explain this situation without sounding like I am bad mouthing the PI if I get asked about this? Please help. Susanna, Josh, and Daniel spend some time describing why those letters of recommendation are so important, and lay out plans A, B, and C for what to do when the PI just won’t deliver. Next, we hear from a listener who is embarking on her first interviews, and wants to know what to wear! I have received my first interview invitations f...

34 MINENE. 24
Comments
126. Listener Mailbag – Ghost PIs, Dress Codes, and Mental Health with Susanna Harris

106. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Acing Your Interview with Dr. Beth Bowman (R)

See our previous episodes in this series: * 101: HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Knowing When, and Where, to Apply with Dr. Beth Bowman* 102: HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement with Dr. Brian Rybarczyk With most jobs, you’ll need to submit a polished resume along with a handful of ebullient references. Maybe you’ll pass through a phone-screen with HR and then spend 20 minutes with the hiring manager. To get into grad school, the interview process will take days. Grad school interviews often start with a flight to a new city. You’ll have a casual chat with the grad student assigned to retrieve you from the airport, then meet the fellow candidate with whom you’ll share a hotel room. The moment you get settled, you’re off to dinner with some faculty, followed by an early bedtime. That’s because tomorrow morning, you’ll pass through a series of orientation sessions, faculty interviews, a tour of the city, and finall...

72 MINENE. 5
Comments
106. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Acing Your Interview with Dr. Beth Bowman (R)

125. Demystifying the Research Institute

Most PhD students attend traditional academic institutions of higher educations. It’s the world of classes, campuses, and mortarboards you probably think of when you think about a University. But there’s a less-traveled path to a PhD that may actually hold some benefits for certain students, including those coming back to school after working for awhile, or those with families. We’re talking about research institutes, and it’s possible you’ve never even heard about this alternative path to a PhD. Research on the Brink Research institutes may not be on every student’s radar. Though there are several varieties, most research institutes exist as hybrids – not quite academic, but not quite industry. Not quite public, but not quite private either. Of the 10,000-15,000 research institutes in the United States, many were formed either to explore specific topics (agriculture, defense, or energy) or to bridge the gap between the lab and the wider world. These bridge-focused institutes...

33 MIN2019 DIC. 16
Comments
125. Demystifying the Research Institute

124. An Art Contest JUST For Hello PhD Listeners

We’re bringing you this bonus episode to encourage our listeners to submit their artwork to the Promega Art Contest for Creative Scientists. This isn’t for everyone – it’s just for listeners of Hello PhD! The deadline is nearly here (December 1st, 2019), but you can still visit the contest page to submit a digital image of your fine artwork, photography, microscopy, or whatever! Five winners will receive prizes by mail and have their art on display at the Promega Employee Art Showcase. One Grand Prize Winner will win a free trip to the Art Show opening in Madison Wisconsin! We called Dr. Aparna Shah, who was last year’s grand-prize winner. Her submission, “an image of an immuno-histochemically stained mouse brain slice acquired on a confocal microscope” came from a project she had since abandoned. Thankfully, that image was still a winner. You can read all about her experience here: Oh, the Places You’ll Go, Thanks to Science! So don’t wait! Submit your images today!

9 MIN2019 NOV. 27
Comments
124. An Art Contest JUST For Hello PhD Listeners

123. Anatomy of a Micropublication feat. Nate Jacobs of Flashpub

In a world where it’s “Publish or Perish,” you’d expect “publish” to be the more favorable option. But, if you’ve ever spent a year or more performing experiments, crafting figures, writing a manuscript, finding a friendly editor and arguing with reviewers, that “perish” option might just sound pretty sweet right about now…. It’s no secret that the publishing industry has an inexplicable choke-hold on the scientific community. A handful of companies exercise editorial control, deciding which findings are permitted to enter the information stream. They charge the researcher who submits the paper, then charge exorbitant fees to the reader to see what was ‘printed.’ While the information age has flooded nearly every aspect of our daily lives, its transformative power sometimes seems to be walled off at the laboratory door. Luckily, there are a few scientists who are willing to chip away at that wall. Minimum Viable Publication Nate Jacobs wasn’t far into his postdoctoral ...

56 MIN2019 NOV. 15
Comments
123. Anatomy of a Micropublication feat. Nate Jacobs of Flashpub

102. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement (R)

Please recount your life story, all of your future plans, and why this graduate program is uniquely suited to fulfill those dreams. Limit your answer to 140 characters. Okay, okay, the typical “Personal Statement” prompt on your grad school application is probably not that outrageous, but they CAN feel both cryptic and overwhelming. Here’s a real prompt from a real grad school application at a major university: In 1-2 pages, describe your career goals, research interests, past and present research experience, and why you’ve chosen the [Name Redacted] Program for your graduate studies. This prompt can induce instant writer’s block in even the most prepared applicants. So where do you begin? This week on the show, we share tips for crafting the perfect personal statement that will highlight your grad-school-readiness and potential for greatness in a career beyond the degree. Anatomy of an Application The typical graduate school application has four main parts: * Transcripts* Test...

64 MIN2019 OCT. 30
Comments
102. HelloPhD Guide to Grad School Applications – Crafting the Perfect Personal Statement (R)
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