Himalaya: Listen. Learn. Grow.

4.8K Ratings
Open In App
title

The Pixie Podcast

Brutal Pixie, presented by Leticia Mooney

0
Followers
0
Plays
The Pixie Podcast

The Pixie Podcast

Brutal Pixie, presented by Leticia Mooney

0
Followers
0
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Details

About Us

Making communication human.

Latest Episodes

Customer Love, with Vance Morris Customer Love, with Vance Morris

Vance Morris is the king of client experience. He coaches executives in Disnifying their businesses; is the author of multiple books; is a keynote speaker… and still runs his own services business as well. To chat about all of this, as well as the nuances of running information services businesses, which is what many of the Pixie’s customers try to do, Leticia brought on Vance for a chat. Here is the audio, and the transcript is below. Remember to subscribe and rate it if you enjoy it! Podcast transcript Ch Leticia: Hello Pixie fans and friends. Today, I have a very special interview for you. It is with Vance Morris, who is someone way up there on my pedestal of people to watch, and follow, and learn from. Vance Morris is one of the world’s leading authorities on customer service, or what he would probably prefer to call it, client service and experience. He’s a renowned expert on direct response marketing, and business building, and marketing strategy. He worked for Disney for a long time, 10 years as a senior manager, where he started in the opening team of the yacht and beach club resorts, and progressed through the management ranks as a nightclub manager at Pleasure Island, service trainer of both the Empress Lilly, and on the revitalization team of the Contemporary Resort in the mid ’90s. Vance is now a Disneyfication trainer, is what I would like to call it. And his book about how to Disnify your business is called Systematic Magic: 7 Magic Keys to Disnify Your Business. And it’s all about service culture and how to improve the customer love, client love in your business. He is a business leader and entrepreneur himself. He has owned a bricks and mortar business, still owns it, still runs it in carpet cleaning. And it’s in that business that he tests his own marketing and direct response strategies before teaching them to other people. And one of the results of that is that his business has started sucking up it’s competitors who couldn’t compete with his marketing. It’s actually quite amazing. I have been following Vance for a long time, and we recorded this interview a few months ago. And so is my intense pleasure to bring this to you. The interview goes for about an hour, and we talk about everything, from service cultures, to remuneration, how kids are raised, what employment is like for them now. The differences between regular bricks and mortar businesses, or regular service businesses and information products businesses, and how you can start thinking differently perhaps about your own marketing, your own publishing, and what kind of place that has for your clientele, and some of the attitudes that it takes to create it. It was a really fun chat. So enjoy it, and I’ll catch you on the flip side. Vance, welcome to the show. Vance: Well, I appreciate it. Thanks so much for having me. Leticia: Now, there are many, many, many things we could talk about, and that you have been interviewed about ad nauseam, from your career, to working for Disney, to entrepreneurship, to direct response marketing. And each one is really an episode in itself, but no doubt, we will touch on each one of them. What I would really like to focus on today is the nexus kind of between all of them at that place where customer love, and content, and publishing kind of overlap. Vance: Certainly. And they do overlap. Leticia: They really do, don’t they? First,

65 minMAY 29
Comments
Customer Love, with Vance Morris Customer Love, with Vance Morris

Publishing success means breaking your programming

Everything you think you know about publishing has been programmed. In order to be really successful at what you do, you have to find a way to break your programming. Your initial exposures to media — TV, radio, books, movies, media online — built your understanding of what “publishing” means. Which means that to find success, you have to find a way of breaking your programming. In an interview with Joe Rogan (which, as all Rogan interviews do, went for three hours), psychologist Dr Jordan Peterson explained it like this: ‘There’s a technological revolution, and it’s a deep one. It’s video, and audio. Immediately accessible to everyone all over the world. What that’s done has turn the spoken word into a tool that has the same reach as the printed word.’ He points out that this is a Gutenberg Revolution but in video and audio — and that it might be deeper, because it isn’t obvious how many people can read. ‘But lots of people can listen,’ he says. He goes on to talk abo...

7 minAPR 6
Comments
Publishing success means breaking your programming

Question of the Week: How to get people to interview?

Getting people to interview doesn’t mean that the tough work is in finding them. It’s in getting them to say ‘yes’. One question I have been asked recently is how do you get people to interview? Before I answer this, let me tell you some of the people I’ve interviewed in my time. I’ve interviewed Rob Halford, the almighty vocalist of classic band Judas Priest; the founder of Wacken festival, which is the world’s largest heavy metal festival; major producers and engineers like Fredrik Nordstrom; and super famous (in Europe) women like Angela Gossow. I’ve interviewed people who are totally unknown, and people that you’ve probably read, like Mike Michalowicz (who wrote books like Profit First and The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur). Of these, some were arranged for me (Halford); some I pitched and won myself (Wacken and Nordstrom); some I am fans or friends of (Michalowicz); some because it was just my job. I know how to unearth people to interview, how to get people to do the work...

16 minMAR 23
Comments
Question of the Week: How to get people to interview?

Sometimes great publishing means befriending the Troll

There’s a Norwegian fairytale that I’m sure you’ve heard. It involves three persuasive goats, a hideous troll, and a bridge. Depending on your business, the subject matter experts in your organisation might be your hideous troll. By nature, they’re much the same. They’re guarding the gateways to knowledge, and beyond them is a promised land of lush pastures that will fatten you up. When their knowledge is challenged, or they are suddenly not in control of the message, they can get very pedantic. They’ll stop your progress, come back to you with all kinds of corrections and excuses. They’ll throw your publishing into the creek, in other words, leaving you to find an alternative. If you manage to find your way around this person, and start having a good time in the beautiful lush grass, you’ll soon find yourself toe-to-toe with a pyssed off troll — er — expert. Subject matter experts become grumpy and ugly not because they are trying to make your life difficult. Most of the ...

9 minMAR 16
Comments
Sometimes great publishing means befriending the Troll

A Tale of Wanting but Not Needing

In this parable, you learn what happens when you start wanting visibility and fame, instead of sticking with what you need. Tripping along the sun-dappled laneway, heading into Pixie territory, was a lovely-looking young woman with long, rippling, dark hair. She was excited about everything. So she ought to be excited! The laneway was filled with stalls, and she had a little bit of money in her pocket. The young woman drank in everything greedily. She’d been barely five paces past the entrance to the seductive fair before she realised how many of these things she wanted. Each stall became more enticing than the last. Unable to hold herself back any longer, she rushed over to a stand filled with little shining lights. As she approached the stall, the lights seemed to gravitate towards her, to shine and sparkle, lighting up her shining eyes and reflecting off her teeth as she laughed. She was wanting one so badly; and the charming, beautiful woman behind the staff was full of complim...

8 minMAR 9
Comments
A Tale of Wanting but Not Needing

Tristran expected a stone and got a lady instead

In Neil Gaiman’s amazing illustrated fairystoryStardust, Tristran promises a girl that he’d bring her back a star, in exchange for whatever she’ll give him. It’s the perfect parable for what happens when reality hits. (He was trying to get in her pants. Ladies, you know this story well already. Fellas, I’m sure you know it too.) So when a star fell out of the sky, and Tristran said he’d bring it back, the object of his affections happily said, ‘You go get your star, boy. Then when you come back you can have whatever you want.’ Phew, she thinks. That got me out of that. And the silly boy is off thinking he can bring a star back to me. But Tristran was part Fae, and so when he went over the Wall to find the star, he got wound up in loads of adventures. He discovered not only that the Star was a woman, but that other people wanted her, too. And, of course, because it’s a fairytale, Tristran and the Star fall in love and eventualy live happily ever after. And the poor lady at t...

4 minMAR 2
Comments
Tristran expected a stone and got a lady instead

Don’t get railroaded by people who get scared

Scared people will behave in all kinds of strange ways. When it comes to your publishing activity, you must learn how to detect and deflect fear: It can sometimes be the only thing that saves your project. Producing any kind of content with the input of others takes loads of time and effort. I believe the concept is of ‘herding cats’. It’s the prime reason why many organisations just don’t do it. Imagine, then, how you would feel if you had spent close to two grand, about eight weeks, several emails, and tons of excitement, only to have someone veto a piece of content because they were a bit damaged by their experience. (I was going to write “a bit nuts”, but that seemed unfair.) A story about someone who got scared I’ll tell you a story. It’s a true story, by the way. Last year, I worked with a fabulous woman who did everything the right way with her business. She did all her hard thinking up-front. This meant that she thought about her branding, and her message. She brough...

8 minFEB 24
Comments
Don’t get railroaded by people who get scared

Stop trying to get Yes. Aim for No instead: Here’s why

No is a word that many people shy away from. But it’s the best word to encourage, in sales, in negotiations, and for your opt-ins! Wait, what? The best word to learn, out of every word you could possibly learn, is No. But not because it saves you from yourself. It makes better sales. And it makes better opt-ins. You’ll already know that there is a big eff-off on the opt-in forms for these emails, so you’ve already had a taste of what that looks like. You saw it, you saw me trying to put you off, and you subscribed anyway. Why did you do that? I’ll tell you why. It made you feel safe. You’ve probably, like many people in Western countries, been conditioned to hear ‘No’ as a negative response. You have probably also studied how to get people to ‘yes’. You may have taken sales courses and negotiating courses that teach you how to ‘push people through the gates of yes’. Well, this is going to break your heart: If you’ve got people to say NO, right up front, you probably woul...

5 minFEB 17
Comments
Stop trying to get Yes. Aim for No instead: Here’s why

Are you as good a publisher as Ned Kelly was?

Ned Kelly’s approach to the world is worth studying. You can apply it to your business publishing, to great effect. As far as famous characters go, you can’t beat Ned Kelly. A man loved far and wide (except by the Police), Kelly was a handsome young fella with strong views about how people ought to be treated. The story of Ned Kelly is known and loved by Australians everywhere. It’s not just because of the romance of The Bushranger. It’s because Ned Kelly was: (a) hanged for revenge (b) Robin Hood. The Kelly mythology was so strong that barely 80 years after he died — in other words, during the life of my own grandmother — it fuelled stories about Ronald Ryan, who was the last man hanged in Australia. But that, my fabulous fledgling publisher, is a story for another time. Instead, I want you to consider how Ned Kelly would have approached your task of producing an effective publication. Ned Kelly: How he would have approached publishing When you make a frankly dastardly mistak...

5 minFEB 10
Comments
Are you as good a publisher as Ned Kelly was?

Checklist: Know that you’re hitting the right audience

This checklist will help you to know that what you’re doing for your audience is right. How do you know that what you’re doing is right for your audience? This checklist will give you a very different set of metrics from what you’re used to. Checklist Here are 10 things that show you that what you’re doing is right for them: 1. Engagement is visible (replies more than likes). 2. When you promote an offer, people buy it. 3. Your subscriber membership is relatively stable or growing. 4. People thank you for the publication. 5. People tell you that you make them think. 6. Your clients are on your list (or ask to be added). 7. Your prospects are on your list (or ask to be added). 8. Strangers approach you at networking events and shyly introduce themselves as “one of your readers”. 9. Other people start asking you if you’ll collaborate with them (because they want access to your list). 10. People start subscribing people people talk about your work. Comments about this checklist ...

3 minFEB 3
Comments
Checklist: Know that you’re hitting the right audience

Latest Episodes

Customer Love, with Vance Morris Customer Love, with Vance Morris

Vance Morris is the king of client experience. He coaches executives in Disnifying their businesses; is the author of multiple books; is a keynote speaker… and still runs his own services business as well. To chat about all of this, as well as the nuances of running information services businesses, which is what many of the Pixie’s customers try to do, Leticia brought on Vance for a chat. Here is the audio, and the transcript is below. Remember to subscribe and rate it if you enjoy it! Podcast transcript Ch Leticia: Hello Pixie fans and friends. Today, I have a very special interview for you. It is with Vance Morris, who is someone way up there on my pedestal of people to watch, and follow, and learn from. Vance Morris is one of the world’s leading authorities on customer service, or what he would probably prefer to call it, client service and experience. He’s a renowned expert on direct response marketing, and business building, and marketing strategy. He worked for Disney for a long time, 10 years as a senior manager, where he started in the opening team of the yacht and beach club resorts, and progressed through the management ranks as a nightclub manager at Pleasure Island, service trainer of both the Empress Lilly, and on the revitalization team of the Contemporary Resort in the mid ’90s. Vance is now a Disneyfication trainer, is what I would like to call it. And his book about how to Disnify your business is called Systematic Magic: 7 Magic Keys to Disnify Your Business. And it’s all about service culture and how to improve the customer love, client love in your business. He is a business leader and entrepreneur himself. He has owned a bricks and mortar business, still owns it, still runs it in carpet cleaning. And it’s in that business that he tests his own marketing and direct response strategies before teaching them to other people. And one of the results of that is that his business has started sucking up it’s competitors who couldn’t compete with his marketing. It’s actually quite amazing. I have been following Vance for a long time, and we recorded this interview a few months ago. And so is my intense pleasure to bring this to you. The interview goes for about an hour, and we talk about everything, from service cultures, to remuneration, how kids are raised, what employment is like for them now. The differences between regular bricks and mortar businesses, or regular service businesses and information products businesses, and how you can start thinking differently perhaps about your own marketing, your own publishing, and what kind of place that has for your clientele, and some of the attitudes that it takes to create it. It was a really fun chat. So enjoy it, and I’ll catch you on the flip side. Vance, welcome to the show. Vance: Well, I appreciate it. Thanks so much for having me. Leticia: Now, there are many, many, many things we could talk about, and that you have been interviewed about ad nauseam, from your career, to working for Disney, to entrepreneurship, to direct response marketing. And each one is really an episode in itself, but no doubt, we will touch on each one of them. What I would really like to focus on today is the nexus kind of between all of them at that place where customer love, and content, and publishing kind of overlap. Vance: Certainly. And they do overlap. Leticia: They really do, don’t they? First,

65 minMAY 29
Comments
Customer Love, with Vance Morris Customer Love, with Vance Morris

Publishing success means breaking your programming

Everything you think you know about publishing has been programmed. In order to be really successful at what you do, you have to find a way to break your programming. Your initial exposures to media — TV, radio, books, movies, media online — built your understanding of what “publishing” means. Which means that to find success, you have to find a way of breaking your programming. In an interview with Joe Rogan (which, as all Rogan interviews do, went for three hours), psychologist Dr Jordan Peterson explained it like this: ‘There’s a technological revolution, and it’s a deep one. It’s video, and audio. Immediately accessible to everyone all over the world. What that’s done has turn the spoken word into a tool that has the same reach as the printed word.’ He points out that this is a Gutenberg Revolution but in video and audio — and that it might be deeper, because it isn’t obvious how many people can read. ‘But lots of people can listen,’ he says. He goes on to talk abo...

7 minAPR 6
Comments
Publishing success means breaking your programming

Question of the Week: How to get people to interview?

Getting people to interview doesn’t mean that the tough work is in finding them. It’s in getting them to say ‘yes’. One question I have been asked recently is how do you get people to interview? Before I answer this, let me tell you some of the people I’ve interviewed in my time. I’ve interviewed Rob Halford, the almighty vocalist of classic band Judas Priest; the founder of Wacken festival, which is the world’s largest heavy metal festival; major producers and engineers like Fredrik Nordstrom; and super famous (in Europe) women like Angela Gossow. I’ve interviewed people who are totally unknown, and people that you’ve probably read, like Mike Michalowicz (who wrote books like Profit First and The Toilet Paper Entrepreneur). Of these, some were arranged for me (Halford); some I pitched and won myself (Wacken and Nordstrom); some I am fans or friends of (Michalowicz); some because it was just my job. I know how to unearth people to interview, how to get people to do the work...

16 minMAR 23
Comments
Question of the Week: How to get people to interview?

Sometimes great publishing means befriending the Troll

There’s a Norwegian fairytale that I’m sure you’ve heard. It involves three persuasive goats, a hideous troll, and a bridge. Depending on your business, the subject matter experts in your organisation might be your hideous troll. By nature, they’re much the same. They’re guarding the gateways to knowledge, and beyond them is a promised land of lush pastures that will fatten you up. When their knowledge is challenged, or they are suddenly not in control of the message, they can get very pedantic. They’ll stop your progress, come back to you with all kinds of corrections and excuses. They’ll throw your publishing into the creek, in other words, leaving you to find an alternative. If you manage to find your way around this person, and start having a good time in the beautiful lush grass, you’ll soon find yourself toe-to-toe with a pyssed off troll — er — expert. Subject matter experts become grumpy and ugly not because they are trying to make your life difficult. Most of the ...

9 minMAR 16
Comments
Sometimes great publishing means befriending the Troll

A Tale of Wanting but Not Needing

In this parable, you learn what happens when you start wanting visibility and fame, instead of sticking with what you need. Tripping along the sun-dappled laneway, heading into Pixie territory, was a lovely-looking young woman with long, rippling, dark hair. She was excited about everything. So she ought to be excited! The laneway was filled with stalls, and she had a little bit of money in her pocket. The young woman drank in everything greedily. She’d been barely five paces past the entrance to the seductive fair before she realised how many of these things she wanted. Each stall became more enticing than the last. Unable to hold herself back any longer, she rushed over to a stand filled with little shining lights. As she approached the stall, the lights seemed to gravitate towards her, to shine and sparkle, lighting up her shining eyes and reflecting off her teeth as she laughed. She was wanting one so badly; and the charming, beautiful woman behind the staff was full of complim...

8 minMAR 9
Comments
A Tale of Wanting but Not Needing

Tristran expected a stone and got a lady instead

In Neil Gaiman’s amazing illustrated fairystoryStardust, Tristran promises a girl that he’d bring her back a star, in exchange for whatever she’ll give him. It’s the perfect parable for what happens when reality hits. (He was trying to get in her pants. Ladies, you know this story well already. Fellas, I’m sure you know it too.) So when a star fell out of the sky, and Tristran said he’d bring it back, the object of his affections happily said, ‘You go get your star, boy. Then when you come back you can have whatever you want.’ Phew, she thinks. That got me out of that. And the silly boy is off thinking he can bring a star back to me. But Tristran was part Fae, and so when he went over the Wall to find the star, he got wound up in loads of adventures. He discovered not only that the Star was a woman, but that other people wanted her, too. And, of course, because it’s a fairytale, Tristran and the Star fall in love and eventualy live happily ever after. And the poor lady at t...

4 minMAR 2
Comments
Tristran expected a stone and got a lady instead

Don’t get railroaded by people who get scared

Scared people will behave in all kinds of strange ways. When it comes to your publishing activity, you must learn how to detect and deflect fear: It can sometimes be the only thing that saves your project. Producing any kind of content with the input of others takes loads of time and effort. I believe the concept is of ‘herding cats’. It’s the prime reason why many organisations just don’t do it. Imagine, then, how you would feel if you had spent close to two grand, about eight weeks, several emails, and tons of excitement, only to have someone veto a piece of content because they were a bit damaged by their experience. (I was going to write “a bit nuts”, but that seemed unfair.) A story about someone who got scared I’ll tell you a story. It’s a true story, by the way. Last year, I worked with a fabulous woman who did everything the right way with her business. She did all her hard thinking up-front. This meant that she thought about her branding, and her message. She brough...

8 minFEB 24
Comments
Don’t get railroaded by people who get scared

Stop trying to get Yes. Aim for No instead: Here’s why

No is a word that many people shy away from. But it’s the best word to encourage, in sales, in negotiations, and for your opt-ins! Wait, what? The best word to learn, out of every word you could possibly learn, is No. But not because it saves you from yourself. It makes better sales. And it makes better opt-ins. You’ll already know that there is a big eff-off on the opt-in forms for these emails, so you’ve already had a taste of what that looks like. You saw it, you saw me trying to put you off, and you subscribed anyway. Why did you do that? I’ll tell you why. It made you feel safe. You’ve probably, like many people in Western countries, been conditioned to hear ‘No’ as a negative response. You have probably also studied how to get people to ‘yes’. You may have taken sales courses and negotiating courses that teach you how to ‘push people through the gates of yes’. Well, this is going to break your heart: If you’ve got people to say NO, right up front, you probably woul...

5 minFEB 17
Comments
Stop trying to get Yes. Aim for No instead: Here’s why

Are you as good a publisher as Ned Kelly was?

Ned Kelly’s approach to the world is worth studying. You can apply it to your business publishing, to great effect. As far as famous characters go, you can’t beat Ned Kelly. A man loved far and wide (except by the Police), Kelly was a handsome young fella with strong views about how people ought to be treated. The story of Ned Kelly is known and loved by Australians everywhere. It’s not just because of the romance of The Bushranger. It’s because Ned Kelly was: (a) hanged for revenge (b) Robin Hood. The Kelly mythology was so strong that barely 80 years after he died — in other words, during the life of my own grandmother — it fuelled stories about Ronald Ryan, who was the last man hanged in Australia. But that, my fabulous fledgling publisher, is a story for another time. Instead, I want you to consider how Ned Kelly would have approached your task of producing an effective publication. Ned Kelly: How he would have approached publishing When you make a frankly dastardly mistak...

5 minFEB 10
Comments
Are you as good a publisher as Ned Kelly was?

Checklist: Know that you’re hitting the right audience

This checklist will help you to know that what you’re doing for your audience is right. How do you know that what you’re doing is right for your audience? This checklist will give you a very different set of metrics from what you’re used to. Checklist Here are 10 things that show you that what you’re doing is right for them: 1. Engagement is visible (replies more than likes). 2. When you promote an offer, people buy it. 3. Your subscriber membership is relatively stable or growing. 4. People thank you for the publication. 5. People tell you that you make them think. 6. Your clients are on your list (or ask to be added). 7. Your prospects are on your list (or ask to be added). 8. Strangers approach you at networking events and shyly introduce themselves as “one of your readers”. 9. Other people start asking you if you’ll collaborate with them (because they want access to your list). 10. People start subscribing people people talk about your work. Comments about this checklist ...

3 minFEB 3
Comments
Checklist: Know that you’re hitting the right audience
success toast
Welcome to Himalaya LearningDozens of podcourses featuring over 100 experts are waiting for you.