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EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder

JUST HUMAN PRODUCTIONS

152
Followers
1.5K
Plays
EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder

EPIDEMIC with Dr. Celine Gounder

JUST HUMAN PRODUCTIONS

152
Followers
1.5K
Plays
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About Us

EPIDEMIC is a twice-weekly podcast on public health and the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19). Hear from some of the world’s leading infectious disease and public health experts. We’ll help you understand the latest science, the bigger context, and bring you diverse angles—from history and anthropology to politics and economics—depth and texture you won’t get elsewhere. Hosted by Dr. Celine Gounder, an infectious disease specialist and epidemiologist who has worked on tuberculosis and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, and was an Ebola worker during the West African epidemic. And co-hosted by Ron Klain, the U.S. Ebola czar from 2014 to 2015. The COVID-19 pandemic may well be the defining moment of our times. Our lives have changed irrevocably. We need to understand the science so we can care for ourselves, our families, and our communities. And we need voices of reason to help us make sense of it all.Email us your questions at hello@justhumanproductions.org or tweet us @celinegounder and @ronaldklain. We’ll answer a couple of questions on the show each week.#SARS-CoV-2 #COVID19 #coronavirus

Latest Episodes

BONUS / Adverse Childhood Experiences / Phillip Fiuty, Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Dr. Nora Volkow, and Dr. Gabor Maté

From the archives of our sister podcast AMERICAN DIAGNOSIS In the 1990s, researchers recruited 17,000 adults to answer questions about childhood stressors and trauma and their health. What does this groundbreaking research -- the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study -- show us about how to treat substance abuse? Guests: Phillip Fiuty, Coordinator for Harm Reduction Programs at Santa Fe Mountain Center, and in recovery from substance abuse; Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Director of the Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis; Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health, and TEDMED 2014 speaker; and Dr. Gabor Maté, an expert on addiction, stress and childhood development, co-founder of Compassion for Addiction, a former physician with the Portland Hotel Society and Insite in Vancouver, Canada, Holocaust survivor, and author of In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts. This podcast was crea...

37 MIN11 h ago
Comments
BONUS / Adverse Childhood Experiences / Phillip Fiuty, Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Dr. Nora Volkow, and Dr. Gabor Maté

S1E41 / Back to Campus / Allison Slater Tate, Eleanor Daugherty, Amy Gorin, and Rochelle Walensky

“If we want to bring students back to college, we have to redefine what college is for the short term… and so we need to think about it with more innovation and depth of thought if we would if we were just applying crisis management models.” —Eleanor Daugherty, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at the University of Connecticut The college experience will look very different for many students gearing up to re-enter schools in the fall. How can colleges prepare to bring students back on campus — if at all? Today, we hear from Eleanor Daugherty, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at the University of Connecticut; Dr. Amy Gorin, Professor of Psychological Sciences at UConn; Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and journalist Allison Slater Tate, about the logistics and planning required to safely resume school in the fall. They discuss social distancing and masking policies on campus, ...

23 MIN3 d ago
Comments
S1E41 / Back to Campus / Allison Slater Tate, Eleanor Daugherty, Amy Gorin, and Rochelle Walensky

S1E40 / Back to School / Arne Duncan, Allison Slater Tate, Stephanie Gounder

“The goal is not to reopen schools; it’s to keep schools open. And if we reopen too fast, just as we reopened States too fast, you saw what happened. States had to shut down and schools would have to shut down. And that for me would be just a travesty. You re-traumatize children and further endanger… their parents and teachers and bus drivers and custodians.” - Arne Duncan, former US Secretary of Education Normally at this time of year, students would be gearing up for the back-to-school season. But this year, school will look very different for students across the nation. And an even bigger question remains: should schools be opening at all? On today’s episode, we hear from Arne Duncan, former US Secretary of Education from the Obama administration, Stephanie Gounder, a charter school principal in Houston, and journalist Allison Slater Tate. Together, they look back at the impact of remote learning on students, parents, and teachers, and discuss how schools could safely reopen — if at all. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards are open through July 31st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast was created by Just Human Productions. We're powered and distributed by Simplecast. We're supported, in part, by listeners like you. #SARSCoV2 #COVID19 #COVID #coronavirus

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
S1E40 / Back to School / Arne Duncan, Allison Slater Tate, Stephanie Gounder

S1E39 / Invisible Women / Ai-jen Poo, Susie Rivera, and Glewna Joseph

“Now that we see them, my hope is that our field of vision about who is working, and just how valuable they are, continues to widen. And that is it's not only about awareness and clapping for them at seven o'clock at night, but we're actively taking action and demanding that they be protected. Demanding that they be compensated. Demanding that they are able to keep their themselves and their families safe, crisis, or no crisis. “ - Ai-jen Poo, Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance The workforce of domestic employees is comprised largely of women and women of color. This group has been severely impacted by COVID-19, facing job insecurity, lack of paid sick days, and low wages. The pandemic relief bills passed by the Senate for essential workers had conspicuously excluded domestic workers, leaving them vulnerable to disruptions caused by the pandemic. In today’s episode, we hear from Ai-jen Poo, the Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance; Susie Rivera, a ho...

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
S1E39 / Invisible Women / Ai-jen Poo, Susie Rivera, and Glewna Joseph

S1E38 / Shoe-Leather Epidemiology / Jay Varma, Kimberly Jocelyn, and Maryama Diaw

“I literally love my job… and being able to wake up and the end of the day and also say … I possibly helped save a life.” — Kimberly Jocelyn Contact tracers like Kimberly are an integral part of New York City’s plan to reopen safely. If someone tests positive for COVID, contact tracers make it possible to determine which network of people may have been exposed to the virus. But, contact tracers are also tasked with the delicate job of informing someone of their possible exposure. On today’s episode, we speak with Maryama Diaw and Kimberly Jocelyn, who are both contact tracers in New York, about their experiences on the job. We also hear from Dr. Jay Varma, a physician and epidemiologist in New York City, about the science behind contact tracing. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast was created by Just Human Pro...

21 MIN2 w ago
Comments
S1E38 / Shoe-Leather Epidemiology / Jay Varma, Kimberly Jocelyn, and Maryama Diaw

S1E37 / Seeking Sanctuary / Julie Levey, Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, and Pastor Jamal Bryant

“I don't have any plans on returning in the immediate future. I don't want history to record that COVID grew in America because of irresponsible religious groups… I want to make sure that we are good stewards of health and responsibility.” - Dr. Jamal Bryant COVID has closed down many religious spaces, profoundly impacting faith communities. Many rituals have been disrupted, and social distancing guidelines are preventing people from gathering. In today’s episode, we hear from Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, senior rabbi of Park Avenue Synagogue, and Pastor Jamal Bryant of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church. Together, they’ll be examining a question people of all religions are asking right now: what does it mean to be a member of a faith community during a time of social distancing? Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast w...

26 MIN2 w ago
Comments
S1E37 / Seeking Sanctuary / Julie Levey, Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, and Pastor Jamal Bryant

S1E36 / Alone Together / Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Lucy Flamm, Jeff Howe, and Jackie Jones

“Loneliness is something we hear a lot from individuals in our community. It's a time of physical distancing. And at first, this was really articulated as social distancing. And I think that's a problem. Yes, we are physically disconnected, but that doesn't mean that we're socially disconnected.” — Lucy Flamm Since COVID swept through the world, shelter in place and social distancing measures have kept us physically apart from our friends, families, and communities. Loneliness and isolation are pressing concerns as social distancing recommendations continue to be in place. But, being physically apart doesn’t mean that we can’t still come together. In a time of physical separation, mutual aid societies — local networks of neighbors helping out neighbors with anything from picking up groceries to pooling money for tires — are an example of community-building during COVID. In today’s episode, we hear from Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a psychologist at Brigham Young University tha...

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
S1E36 / Alone Together / Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Lucy Flamm, Jeff Howe, and Jackie Jones

S1E35 / What's Essential Health Care in a Pandemic? / Cecile Richards, Kersha Deibel, and a doctor

"...the pandemic has simply highlighted for some people that hypocrisy, where politicians use so-called medical reasons, protecting women's health, as an excuse for what are really political goals, which is to end access to safe and legal abortion writ large." -Cecile Richards The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound effects on women's’ access to abortion services and reproductive health. In some states, abortion was categorized as elective surgery, and procedures were suspended. In today’s episode, we hear from Cecile Richards, the former president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Kersha Deibel, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio, and an abortion provider. They discuss the barriers to reproductive health access raised by COVID-19, the disparities this causes, and the impacts on women and healthcare providers. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nomina...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
S1E35 / What's Essential Health Care in a Pandemic? / Cecile Richards, Kersha Deibel, and a doctor

S1E34 / Hands-On / Nicola Corl, Shannon Adams, and Latia Curtis

“They say, you need to keep a minimum of six feet distance between people, but we're usually within 10 inches of our clients for the entire time that they are in the salon. The biggest risk is when you're in extended or prolonged, rather contact with somebody and the CDC defines that as more than 15 minutes. I don't know if you've ever had a haircut that took less than 15 minutes, but generally speaking, we cannot social distance from our clients.” - Nicola Corl With the economy re-opening, many workers in America are choosing between protecting their own health and protecting their businesses. This is particularly striking for hands-on workers - like hairstylist Nicola Corl, make-up artist Latia Curtis, and massage therapist Shannon Adams - who cannot work from home or socially distance from their clients. In today’s episode, Dr. Celine Gounder speaks with Nicola, Latia, and Shannon, about how coronavirus has impacted their industries, and how they have personally balanced busin...

22 MINJUL 10
Comments
S1E34 / Hands-On / Nicola Corl, Shannon Adams, and Latia Curtis

S1E33 / The "Privilege" of "Immunity" / Kathryn Olivarius, Juanita Mora, and Esha Bhandari

“An immunity passport system would create a two-tier system because it would divide all of us into those who are immune to COVID-19 and those who are not. And the people who are immune will get all of the benefits and privileges that come with that while everybody else who's not immune will be in a second class status.” - Esha Bhandari How do we balance the reopening of the economy with public health and safety? Some have proposed an “immune passport” system, where those with proven COVID immunity could be cleared to resume normal work and life. This idea is not a new one — it has been tried once before during the 19th-century Yellow Fever epidemic. In today’s episode, we examine the insidious use of “immune privilege” during the Yellow Fever epidemic, its historical impacts, and its parallels to today. Our host, Dr. Celine Gounder, speaks with Dr. Juanita Mora, an allergist and immunologist practicing in Chicago, Dr. Kathryn Olivarius, professor of history at Stanford Unive...

21 MINJUL 7
Comments
S1E33 / The "Privilege" of "Immunity" / Kathryn Olivarius, Juanita Mora, and Esha Bhandari

Latest Episodes

BONUS / Adverse Childhood Experiences / Phillip Fiuty, Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Dr. Nora Volkow, and Dr. Gabor Maté

From the archives of our sister podcast AMERICAN DIAGNOSIS In the 1990s, researchers recruited 17,000 adults to answer questions about childhood stressors and trauma and their health. What does this groundbreaking research -- the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study -- show us about how to treat substance abuse? Guests: Phillip Fiuty, Coordinator for Harm Reduction Programs at Santa Fe Mountain Center, and in recovery from substance abuse; Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Director of the Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis; Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse at the National Institutes of Health, and TEDMED 2014 speaker; and Dr. Gabor Maté, an expert on addiction, stress and childhood development, co-founder of Compassion for Addiction, a former physician with the Portland Hotel Society and Insite in Vancouver, Canada, Holocaust survivor, and author of In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts. This podcast was crea...

37 MIN11 h ago
Comments
BONUS / Adverse Childhood Experiences / Phillip Fiuty, Dr. Daniel Sumrok, Dr. Nora Volkow, and Dr. Gabor Maté

S1E41 / Back to Campus / Allison Slater Tate, Eleanor Daugherty, Amy Gorin, and Rochelle Walensky

“If we want to bring students back to college, we have to redefine what college is for the short term… and so we need to think about it with more innovation and depth of thought if we would if we were just applying crisis management models.” —Eleanor Daugherty, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at the University of Connecticut The college experience will look very different for many students gearing up to re-enter schools in the fall. How can colleges prepare to bring students back on campus — if at all? Today, we hear from Eleanor Daugherty, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at the University of Connecticut; Dr. Amy Gorin, Professor of Psychological Sciences at UConn; Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School; and journalist Allison Slater Tate, about the logistics and planning required to safely resume school in the fall. They discuss social distancing and masking policies on campus, ...

23 MIN3 d ago
Comments
S1E41 / Back to Campus / Allison Slater Tate, Eleanor Daugherty, Amy Gorin, and Rochelle Walensky

S1E40 / Back to School / Arne Duncan, Allison Slater Tate, Stephanie Gounder

“The goal is not to reopen schools; it’s to keep schools open. And if we reopen too fast, just as we reopened States too fast, you saw what happened. States had to shut down and schools would have to shut down. And that for me would be just a travesty. You re-traumatize children and further endanger… their parents and teachers and bus drivers and custodians.” - Arne Duncan, former US Secretary of Education Normally at this time of year, students would be gearing up for the back-to-school season. But this year, school will look very different for students across the nation. And an even bigger question remains: should schools be opening at all? On today’s episode, we hear from Arne Duncan, former US Secretary of Education from the Obama administration, Stephanie Gounder, a charter school principal in Houston, and journalist Allison Slater Tate. Together, they look back at the impact of remote learning on students, parents, and teachers, and discuss how schools could safely reopen — if at all. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards are open through July 31st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast was created by Just Human Productions. We're powered and distributed by Simplecast. We're supported, in part, by listeners like you. #SARSCoV2 #COVID19 #COVID #coronavirus

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
S1E40 / Back to School / Arne Duncan, Allison Slater Tate, Stephanie Gounder

S1E39 / Invisible Women / Ai-jen Poo, Susie Rivera, and Glewna Joseph

“Now that we see them, my hope is that our field of vision about who is working, and just how valuable they are, continues to widen. And that is it's not only about awareness and clapping for them at seven o'clock at night, but we're actively taking action and demanding that they be protected. Demanding that they be compensated. Demanding that they are able to keep their themselves and their families safe, crisis, or no crisis. “ - Ai-jen Poo, Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance The workforce of domestic employees is comprised largely of women and women of color. This group has been severely impacted by COVID-19, facing job insecurity, lack of paid sick days, and low wages. The pandemic relief bills passed by the Senate for essential workers had conspicuously excluded domestic workers, leaving them vulnerable to disruptions caused by the pandemic. In today’s episode, we hear from Ai-jen Poo, the Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance; Susie Rivera, a ho...

22 MIN1 w ago
Comments
S1E39 / Invisible Women / Ai-jen Poo, Susie Rivera, and Glewna Joseph

S1E38 / Shoe-Leather Epidemiology / Jay Varma, Kimberly Jocelyn, and Maryama Diaw

“I literally love my job… and being able to wake up and the end of the day and also say … I possibly helped save a life.” — Kimberly Jocelyn Contact tracers like Kimberly are an integral part of New York City’s plan to reopen safely. If someone tests positive for COVID, contact tracers make it possible to determine which network of people may have been exposed to the virus. But, contact tracers are also tasked with the delicate job of informing someone of their possible exposure. On today’s episode, we speak with Maryama Diaw and Kimberly Jocelyn, who are both contact tracers in New York, about their experiences on the job. We also hear from Dr. Jay Varma, a physician and epidemiologist in New York City, about the science behind contact tracing. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast was created by Just Human Pro...

21 MIN2 w ago
Comments
S1E38 / Shoe-Leather Epidemiology / Jay Varma, Kimberly Jocelyn, and Maryama Diaw

S1E37 / Seeking Sanctuary / Julie Levey, Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, and Pastor Jamal Bryant

“I don't have any plans on returning in the immediate future. I don't want history to record that COVID grew in America because of irresponsible religious groups… I want to make sure that we are good stewards of health and responsibility.” - Dr. Jamal Bryant COVID has closed down many religious spaces, profoundly impacting faith communities. Many rituals have been disrupted, and social distancing guidelines are preventing people from gathering. In today’s episode, we hear from Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, senior rabbi of Park Avenue Synagogue, and Pastor Jamal Bryant of New Birth Missionary Baptist Church. Together, they’ll be examining a question people of all religions are asking right now: what does it mean to be a member of a faith community during a time of social distancing? Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nominate us in the People’s Choice and Health categories. This podcast w...

26 MIN2 w ago
Comments
S1E37 / Seeking Sanctuary / Julie Levey, Rabbi Elliot Cosgrove, and Pastor Jamal Bryant

S1E36 / Alone Together / Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Lucy Flamm, Jeff Howe, and Jackie Jones

“Loneliness is something we hear a lot from individuals in our community. It's a time of physical distancing. And at first, this was really articulated as social distancing. And I think that's a problem. Yes, we are physically disconnected, but that doesn't mean that we're socially disconnected.” — Lucy Flamm Since COVID swept through the world, shelter in place and social distancing measures have kept us physically apart from our friends, families, and communities. Loneliness and isolation are pressing concerns as social distancing recommendations continue to be in place. But, being physically apart doesn’t mean that we can’t still come together. In a time of physical separation, mutual aid societies — local networks of neighbors helping out neighbors with anything from picking up groceries to pooling money for tires — are an example of community-building during COVID. In today’s episode, we hear from Dr. Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a psychologist at Brigham Young University tha...

19 MIN3 w ago
Comments
S1E36 / Alone Together / Julianne Holt-Lunstad, Lucy Flamm, Jeff Howe, and Jackie Jones

S1E35 / What's Essential Health Care in a Pandemic? / Cecile Richards, Kersha Deibel, and a doctor

"...the pandemic has simply highlighted for some people that hypocrisy, where politicians use so-called medical reasons, protecting women's health, as an excuse for what are really political goals, which is to end access to safe and legal abortion writ large." -Cecile Richards The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound effects on women's’ access to abortion services and reproductive health. In some states, abortion was categorized as elective surgery, and procedures were suspended. In today’s episode, we hear from Cecile Richards, the former president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Kersha Deibel, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southwest Ohio, and an abortion provider. They discuss the barriers to reproductive health access raised by COVID-19, the disparities this causes, and the impacts on women and healthcare providers. Nominations for the 2020 People's Choice Podcast Awards opened on July 1st. To show your support, please go to podcastawards.com and nomina...

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
S1E35 / What's Essential Health Care in a Pandemic? / Cecile Richards, Kersha Deibel, and a doctor

S1E34 / Hands-On / Nicola Corl, Shannon Adams, and Latia Curtis

“They say, you need to keep a minimum of six feet distance between people, but we're usually within 10 inches of our clients for the entire time that they are in the salon. The biggest risk is when you're in extended or prolonged, rather contact with somebody and the CDC defines that as more than 15 minutes. I don't know if you've ever had a haircut that took less than 15 minutes, but generally speaking, we cannot social distance from our clients.” - Nicola Corl With the economy re-opening, many workers in America are choosing between protecting their own health and protecting their businesses. This is particularly striking for hands-on workers - like hairstylist Nicola Corl, make-up artist Latia Curtis, and massage therapist Shannon Adams - who cannot work from home or socially distance from their clients. In today’s episode, Dr. Celine Gounder speaks with Nicola, Latia, and Shannon, about how coronavirus has impacted their industries, and how they have personally balanced busin...

22 MINJUL 10
Comments
S1E34 / Hands-On / Nicola Corl, Shannon Adams, and Latia Curtis

S1E33 / The "Privilege" of "Immunity" / Kathryn Olivarius, Juanita Mora, and Esha Bhandari

“An immunity passport system would create a two-tier system because it would divide all of us into those who are immune to COVID-19 and those who are not. And the people who are immune will get all of the benefits and privileges that come with that while everybody else who's not immune will be in a second class status.” - Esha Bhandari How do we balance the reopening of the economy with public health and safety? Some have proposed an “immune passport” system, where those with proven COVID immunity could be cleared to resume normal work and life. This idea is not a new one — it has been tried once before during the 19th-century Yellow Fever epidemic. In today’s episode, we examine the insidious use of “immune privilege” during the Yellow Fever epidemic, its historical impacts, and its parallels to today. Our host, Dr. Celine Gounder, speaks with Dr. Juanita Mora, an allergist and immunologist practicing in Chicago, Dr. Kathryn Olivarius, professor of history at Stanford Unive...

21 MINJUL 7
Comments
S1E33 / The "Privilege" of "Immunity" / Kathryn Olivarius, Juanita Mora, and Esha Bhandari
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