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The Peter Attia Drive

Peter Attia, MD

1.1K
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13.0K
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The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

Peter Attia, MD

1.1K
Followers
13.0K
Plays
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About Us

Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.

Latest Episodes

AMA #14: What lab tests can (and cannot) inform us about our overall objective of longevity

In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter explains his framework for understanding what lab tests can (and cannot) inform us as it pertains to overall longevity, with a specific focus on atherosclerosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and the physical body. Additionally, Peter shares details into two patient case studies around cardiovascular disease, including how the lab results influenced his diagnosis and treatment plan for the patients. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter’s head of research, will be asking the questions. If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA.If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on yourprivate RSS feedor on our website at theAMA #14 show notes page. We discuss: Important lab tests and reference ranges [2:35]; How lab testing fits into the overall objective of longevity [4:25]; A healthcare system set up to react to a disease rather than prevent it [8:00]; The ...

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
AMA #14: What lab tests can (and cannot) inform us about our overall objective of longevity

Lew Cantley, Ph.D.: Cancer metabolism, cancer therapies, and the discovery of PI3K

In this episode, Lew Cantley, Professor of cancer biology and Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medical College in NYC, walks us through his amazing discovery of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the implications for the care of patients with cancer. He explains various combinations of therapies being tested and used, including the possibility of pairing prescriptive nutritional therapies to increase the efficacy of drugs like PI3K inhibitors. Lew also explains the metabolic nature of cancer through the lens of his research into the connection between sugar consumption, insulin resistance, and tumor growth. Additionally, Lew provides some details about his exciting new clinical trial that is just now enrolling patients with stage 4 breast cancer and endometrial cancer. We discuss: Teaching science through the lens of discovery—A better approach to learning science [5:15]; The metabolic nature of cancer, mitochondria, and a more nuanced explan...

131 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Lew Cantley, Ph.D.: Cancer metabolism, cancer therapies, and the discovery of PI3K

John Dudley: The beauty in archery, the love of practice, and a model system for life

In this episode, professional archer, John Dudley, shares the many insights he’s gleaned through the process of not only becoming an elite competitor of archery but also an exceptional teacher. John describes how his desire for improvement has cultivated a sheer love of practice, and how pursuing mastery helped put into context how archery is an amazing model system for life. Additionally, John discusses the often misunderstood nature of hunting, but also makes the case as to why one should consider trying archery even if there is no desire to hunt. We discuss: Why John loves archery, and what it means to be a professional archer [4:50]; How John’s love of practice and training led to archery [10:45]; How an intense desire to improve drove John to quit football and pursue archery [22:00]; A traumatic childhood event that changed John’s course from troublemaker to committed athlete [34:15]; The nuts and bolts of archery—Competitive events, types of bows, hunting, etc. [45:30]; Th...

136 MIN3 w ago
Comments
John Dudley: The beauty in archery, the love of practice, and a model system for life

AMA #13: 3-day fasting, exogenous ketones, autophagy, and exercise for longevity

In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter explains some observations he’s noticed since switching to a 3-day fasting cycle from the longer fasts, the various things he’s measuring, and some helpful tips for getting through a prolonged fast. He also discusses the role of exogenous ketones in fasting and ketogenic diets as well as their impact on autophagy, specifically. Finally, Peter provides some practical advice for those looking to fit exercise for longevity into their busy life. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter's head of research, will be asking the questions. If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on yourprivate RSS feedor on our website at theAMA #13 show notes page. If you are not a subscriber, you'll be able to listen to a sneak peak of this episode. We discuss: Peter’s observations since switching from a 7-day to a 3-day fasting ...

15 MINAPR 21
Comments
AMA #13: 3-day fasting, exogenous ketones, autophagy, and exercise for longevity

John Barry: 1918 Spanish flu pandemic—historical account, parallels to today, and lessons

n this episode, John Barry, historian and author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, describes what happened with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, including where itlikelyoriginated, how and why it spread, and what may have accounted for the occurrence of three separate waves of the virus, each with different rates of infection and mortality. While the current coronavirus pandemic pales in comparison to thedevastation of theSpanish flu, John highlights a number of parallels that can be drawn and lessons to be learned and applied going forward. We discuss: What got John interested in the Spanish flu and led to him writing his book? [2:45]; Historical account of the 1918 Spanish flu—origin, the first wave in the summer of 1918, the death rate, and how it compared to other pandemics [10:30]; Evidence that second wave in the fall of 1918 was a mutation of the same virus, and the immunity immunity protection for those exposed to the first wave [18:00]; ...

81 MINAPR 17
Comments
John Barry: 1918 Spanish flu pandemic—historical account, parallels to today, and lessons

Amesh Adalja, M.D.: ComparingCOVID-19to past pandemics, preparing for the future, and reasons for optimism

In this episode, infectious disease and pandemic preparedness expert, Amesh Adalja, M.D., puts the current pandemic into context against previous coronaviruses as well as past influenza pandemics. Amesh also provides his interpretation of the evolving metrics which have contributed to big variations in modeling predictions, whether this will be a seasonally recurring virus, and perhaps most importantly—how we can be better prepared for the inevitable future novel virus. Finally, Amesh explains where he sees positive trends which give him reasons for optimism. We discuss: Amesh’s background in infectious disease [2:40]; When did the virus actually reach the US? And when did Amesh realize it would pose a real threat to the US? [4:00]; Comparing and contrasting COVID-19 to previous pandemics like the Asian flu of 1958 and the Spanish flu of 1918 [8:00]; Will COVID-19 be a recurring seasonal virus every year? [14:00]; Will a future vaccine be specific to this COVID-19 or will it also ...

44 MINAPR 13
Comments
Amesh Adalja, M.D.: ComparingCOVID-19to past pandemics, preparing for the future, and reasons for optimism

Paul Conti, M.D.: The psychological toll of a pandemic, and the societal problems it has highlighted

In this episode, psychiatrist Paul Conti, M.D. discusses the impact of the fear and uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting stress, anxiety, and trauma it may impart on the population. Paul examines how this situation has highlighted the challenges we face at the societal level as well as the individual level, and stresses the importance of seeking absolute truth above personal truth and taking action as individuals as a means to combat many of these pervasive problems. We discuss: Paul’s personal experience with a presumptive case of COVID-19 [2:15]; Through the lens of trauma, Paul’s overall take on the lasting effects of this pandemic on society [4:30]; The imperative to unite as a species given the isolating and suspicious nature of an invisible enemy [8:15]; The indigent population and the affluent population—The commonalities and differences in how both populations have been affected [16:15]; The prevailing feeling of demoralization spanning the popu...

86 MINAPR 10
Comments
Paul Conti, M.D.: The psychological toll of a pandemic, and the societal problems it has highlighted

COVID-19 for kids with Olivia Attia

In this episode, Peter sits down with his daughter to answer questions from her and other kids about COVID-19. We discuss: What is a virus? [1:45]; How did this version of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) start? [4:30]; How does COVID-19 compare to SARS and MERS (previous coronaviruses)? [6:00]; Will COVID-19 come back again after we resolve the current issue? [7:15]; When will kids go back to school? [7:45]; How has the US surpassed China in total cases, and how could we have been better prepared for this? [8:30]; Should have we started to quarantine sooner than we actually did? [11:45]; What about herd immunity? Would it be easier if we all just got the virus so we could be immune? [13:45]; Which age groups are the least and most at risk for getting a deadly version of the virus? [15:00]; Why do we have to wipe down packages that are delivered to our homes? [16:30]; How a lack of preparation and discipline led to this troubling situation [18:45]; Is China to blame for all of this? [24:15]...

34 MINAPR 8
Comments
COVID-19 for kids with Olivia Attia

Looking back on the first99episodes: Strong Convictions, Loosely Held

In this episode,originally recorded to be the 100thepisode of The Drive, Peter discusses topics that he has changed his mind about since starting the podcast as a result of preparing for interviews as well as from the actual conversations. Peter also reviews some of his favorite moments from the first99episodes, shares what books he’s currently reading, and much more. Initially scheduled to be released as episode 100, this was delayed due to recent podcasts covering COVID-19. We discuss: Definition of “strong convictions loosely held,” and the value in trying to shoot down your own hypotheses [2:20]; Metformin—How Peter’s strong convictions have changed since 2018 [8:00]; Getting a dog—Why Peter caved and how it’s going so far [15:45]; Rapamycin—How Peter’s feelings have evolved, and the questions still needing to be answered [20:45]; Archery, the joy of pursuing mastery, and the importance of stillness [26:50]; Zone 2 training—Why Peter has made it a big component of his ...

77 MINAPR 6
Comments
Looking back on the first99episodes: Strong Convictions, Loosely Held

Michael Osterholm, Ph.D.: COVID-19—Lessons learned, challenges ahead, and reasons for optimism and concern

In this episode, Michael Osterholm, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and author of Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, provides an overview on the COVID-19 pandemic in regards to what has happened to date, what we’ve learned about how the disease spreads, and his optimism and pessimism about what potentially lies ahead. Michael gives his take on the true case fatality rate, why it differs around the world, and which underlying conditions, such as obesity, impact risk of severe illness and death. We also discuss the outlook regarding vaccines, repurposed drugs/antivirals for treatment, and Michael’s growing concern about supply chain limitations with respect to drugs, vaccines, n95 masks, and testing kits. We discuss: Recapping the brief history of COVID-19 and what potentially lies ahead [2:15]; Some positive news about immunity and reinfection [10:45]; Case fatality rate—The challenge in finding the true ...

82 MINAPR 1
Comments
Michael Osterholm, Ph.D.: COVID-19—Lessons learned, challenges ahead, and reasons for optimism and concern

Latest Episodes

AMA #14: What lab tests can (and cannot) inform us about our overall objective of longevity

In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter explains his framework for understanding what lab tests can (and cannot) inform us as it pertains to overall longevity, with a specific focus on atherosclerosis, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and the physical body. Additionally, Peter shares details into two patient case studies around cardiovascular disease, including how the lab results influenced his diagnosis and treatment plan for the patients. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter’s head of research, will be asking the questions. If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA.If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on yourprivate RSS feedor on our website at theAMA #14 show notes page. We discuss: Important lab tests and reference ranges [2:35]; How lab testing fits into the overall objective of longevity [4:25]; A healthcare system set up to react to a disease rather than prevent it [8:00]; The ...

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
AMA #14: What lab tests can (and cannot) inform us about our overall objective of longevity

Lew Cantley, Ph.D.: Cancer metabolism, cancer therapies, and the discovery of PI3K

In this episode, Lew Cantley, Professor of cancer biology and Director of the Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medical College in NYC, walks us through his amazing discovery of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and the implications for the care of patients with cancer. He explains various combinations of therapies being tested and used, including the possibility of pairing prescriptive nutritional therapies to increase the efficacy of drugs like PI3K inhibitors. Lew also explains the metabolic nature of cancer through the lens of his research into the connection between sugar consumption, insulin resistance, and tumor growth. Additionally, Lew provides some details about his exciting new clinical trial that is just now enrolling patients with stage 4 breast cancer and endometrial cancer. We discuss: Teaching science through the lens of discovery—A better approach to learning science [5:15]; The metabolic nature of cancer, mitochondria, and a more nuanced explan...

131 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Lew Cantley, Ph.D.: Cancer metabolism, cancer therapies, and the discovery of PI3K

John Dudley: The beauty in archery, the love of practice, and a model system for life

In this episode, professional archer, John Dudley, shares the many insights he’s gleaned through the process of not only becoming an elite competitor of archery but also an exceptional teacher. John describes how his desire for improvement has cultivated a sheer love of practice, and how pursuing mastery helped put into context how archery is an amazing model system for life. Additionally, John discusses the often misunderstood nature of hunting, but also makes the case as to why one should consider trying archery even if there is no desire to hunt. We discuss: Why John loves archery, and what it means to be a professional archer [4:50]; How John’s love of practice and training led to archery [10:45]; How an intense desire to improve drove John to quit football and pursue archery [22:00]; A traumatic childhood event that changed John’s course from troublemaker to committed athlete [34:15]; The nuts and bolts of archery—Competitive events, types of bows, hunting, etc. [45:30]; Th...

136 MIN3 w ago
Comments
John Dudley: The beauty in archery, the love of practice, and a model system for life

AMA #13: 3-day fasting, exogenous ketones, autophagy, and exercise for longevity

In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter explains some observations he’s noticed since switching to a 3-day fasting cycle from the longer fasts, the various things he’s measuring, and some helpful tips for getting through a prolonged fast. He also discusses the role of exogenous ketones in fasting and ketogenic diets as well as their impact on autophagy, specifically. Finally, Peter provides some practical advice for those looking to fit exercise for longevity into their busy life. Once again, Bob Kaplan, Peter's head of research, will be asking the questions. If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on yourprivate RSS feedor on our website at theAMA #13 show notes page. If you are not a subscriber, you'll be able to listen to a sneak peak of this episode. We discuss: Peter’s observations since switching from a 7-day to a 3-day fasting ...

15 MINAPR 21
Comments
AMA #13: 3-day fasting, exogenous ketones, autophagy, and exercise for longevity

John Barry: 1918 Spanish flu pandemic—historical account, parallels to today, and lessons

n this episode, John Barry, historian and author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, describes what happened with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, including where itlikelyoriginated, how and why it spread, and what may have accounted for the occurrence of three separate waves of the virus, each with different rates of infection and mortality. While the current coronavirus pandemic pales in comparison to thedevastation of theSpanish flu, John highlights a number of parallels that can be drawn and lessons to be learned and applied going forward. We discuss: What got John interested in the Spanish flu and led to him writing his book? [2:45]; Historical account of the 1918 Spanish flu—origin, the first wave in the summer of 1918, the death rate, and how it compared to other pandemics [10:30]; Evidence that second wave in the fall of 1918 was a mutation of the same virus, and the immunity immunity protection for those exposed to the first wave [18:00]; ...

81 MINAPR 17
Comments
John Barry: 1918 Spanish flu pandemic—historical account, parallels to today, and lessons

Amesh Adalja, M.D.: ComparingCOVID-19to past pandemics, preparing for the future, and reasons for optimism

In this episode, infectious disease and pandemic preparedness expert, Amesh Adalja, M.D., puts the current pandemic into context against previous coronaviruses as well as past influenza pandemics. Amesh also provides his interpretation of the evolving metrics which have contributed to big variations in modeling predictions, whether this will be a seasonally recurring virus, and perhaps most importantly—how we can be better prepared for the inevitable future novel virus. Finally, Amesh explains where he sees positive trends which give him reasons for optimism. We discuss: Amesh’s background in infectious disease [2:40]; When did the virus actually reach the US? And when did Amesh realize it would pose a real threat to the US? [4:00]; Comparing and contrasting COVID-19 to previous pandemics like the Asian flu of 1958 and the Spanish flu of 1918 [8:00]; Will COVID-19 be a recurring seasonal virus every year? [14:00]; Will a future vaccine be specific to this COVID-19 or will it also ...

44 MINAPR 13
Comments
Amesh Adalja, M.D.: ComparingCOVID-19to past pandemics, preparing for the future, and reasons for optimism

Paul Conti, M.D.: The psychological toll of a pandemic, and the societal problems it has highlighted

In this episode, psychiatrist Paul Conti, M.D. discusses the impact of the fear and uncertainty surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting stress, anxiety, and trauma it may impart on the population. Paul examines how this situation has highlighted the challenges we face at the societal level as well as the individual level, and stresses the importance of seeking absolute truth above personal truth and taking action as individuals as a means to combat many of these pervasive problems. We discuss: Paul’s personal experience with a presumptive case of COVID-19 [2:15]; Through the lens of trauma, Paul’s overall take on the lasting effects of this pandemic on society [4:30]; The imperative to unite as a species given the isolating and suspicious nature of an invisible enemy [8:15]; The indigent population and the affluent population—The commonalities and differences in how both populations have been affected [16:15]; The prevailing feeling of demoralization spanning the popu...

86 MINAPR 10
Comments
Paul Conti, M.D.: The psychological toll of a pandemic, and the societal problems it has highlighted

COVID-19 for kids with Olivia Attia

In this episode, Peter sits down with his daughter to answer questions from her and other kids about COVID-19. We discuss: What is a virus? [1:45]; How did this version of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) start? [4:30]; How does COVID-19 compare to SARS and MERS (previous coronaviruses)? [6:00]; Will COVID-19 come back again after we resolve the current issue? [7:15]; When will kids go back to school? [7:45]; How has the US surpassed China in total cases, and how could we have been better prepared for this? [8:30]; Should have we started to quarantine sooner than we actually did? [11:45]; What about herd immunity? Would it be easier if we all just got the virus so we could be immune? [13:45]; Which age groups are the least and most at risk for getting a deadly version of the virus? [15:00]; Why do we have to wipe down packages that are delivered to our homes? [16:30]; How a lack of preparation and discipline led to this troubling situation [18:45]; Is China to blame for all of this? [24:15]...

34 MINAPR 8
Comments
COVID-19 for kids with Olivia Attia

Looking back on the first99episodes: Strong Convictions, Loosely Held

In this episode,originally recorded to be the 100thepisode of The Drive, Peter discusses topics that he has changed his mind about since starting the podcast as a result of preparing for interviews as well as from the actual conversations. Peter also reviews some of his favorite moments from the first99episodes, shares what books he’s currently reading, and much more. Initially scheduled to be released as episode 100, this was delayed due to recent podcasts covering COVID-19. We discuss: Definition of “strong convictions loosely held,” and the value in trying to shoot down your own hypotheses [2:20]; Metformin—How Peter’s strong convictions have changed since 2018 [8:00]; Getting a dog—Why Peter caved and how it’s going so far [15:45]; Rapamycin—How Peter’s feelings have evolved, and the questions still needing to be answered [20:45]; Archery, the joy of pursuing mastery, and the importance of stillness [26:50]; Zone 2 training—Why Peter has made it a big component of his ...

77 MINAPR 6
Comments
Looking back on the first99episodes: Strong Convictions, Loosely Held

Michael Osterholm, Ph.D.: COVID-19—Lessons learned, challenges ahead, and reasons for optimism and concern

In this episode, Michael Osterholm, Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota and author of Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, provides an overview on the COVID-19 pandemic in regards to what has happened to date, what we’ve learned about how the disease spreads, and his optimism and pessimism about what potentially lies ahead. Michael gives his take on the true case fatality rate, why it differs around the world, and which underlying conditions, such as obesity, impact risk of severe illness and death. We also discuss the outlook regarding vaccines, repurposed drugs/antivirals for treatment, and Michael’s growing concern about supply chain limitations with respect to drugs, vaccines, n95 masks, and testing kits. We discuss: Recapping the brief history of COVID-19 and what potentially lies ahead [2:15]; Some positive news about immunity and reinfection [10:45]; Case fatality rate—The challenge in finding the true ...

82 MINAPR 1
Comments
Michael Osterholm, Ph.D.: COVID-19—Lessons learned, challenges ahead, and reasons for optimism and concern

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