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Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

David Burns, MD

129
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523
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Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

Feeling Good Podcast | TEAM-CBT - The New Mood Therapy

David Burns, MD

129
Followers
523
Plays
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About Us

This podcast features David D. Burns MD, author of "Feeling Good, The New Mood Therapy," describing powerful new techniques to overcome depression and anxiety and develop greater joy and self-esteem. For therapists and the general public alike!

Latest Episodes

Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 2: "Wow! The Changes Were Real!"

Last week you heard Part 1 of David’s TEAM Therapy session with Neil Sattin, who became pretty despondent and discouraged right after the first shut down because of the covid-19 pandemic in March of 2020. David and Neil went through the T = Testing and E = Empathy parts of TEAM, and David helped Neil develop a Daily Mood Log so he could record his negative thoughts and feelings at one specific moment at the end of a day when he was feeling like he hadn’t gotten enough work done. Perhaps you’ve had the same problem at times! Today you’ll hear the A = Assessment of Resistance and M = Methods parts of the session. As they begin, David asks Neil the Magic Button and Miracle Cure questions, and Neil says that he definitely does want help and would push the Magic Button to make all of his negative thoughts and feelings on his Daily Mood Log disappear. David cautions against that and suggests Positive Reframing, asking two questions about each negative thought and feeling. What does this thought or feeling show about you that’s positive and awesome? What are some potential benefits, or advantages, of this thought or feeling? Here’s Neil’s list of Positives: My sadness: Shows that I’m ambitious Motivates me to achieve a lot Shows that I have high standards My anxiety: Shows that I’m responsible Keeps me vigilant Fuels me to take action Reminds me that I’m doing important things My guilt: Shows that I have a moral compass My feelings of defectiveness and inadequacy: Show that I want to be a good role model Show that I’m willing to be honest about my flaws Show that I hold myself accountable Show that I’m humble My feelings of being alone show that: I value connections with others Allow me to feel close to people My feelings of embarrassment and humiliation show that: I have high standards and goals I want my life to mean something I value acceptance My discouragement shows that: I have a vision I’m realistic about the many challenges I face and the sheer volume of work I have to do I’m willing to face the truth My frustration shows that: I’ll persevere. I won’t stop and give up. Feeling annoyed and irritated: Shows that I won’t tolerate things that get in my way Gives me energy and determination Feeling overwhelmed: Reminds me that I might be taking on too much Protects me from trying and failing Shows that I’m looking for ways to take care of myself. After listing these positives, Neil used the Magic Dial and indicated that he’d like to dial down his negative feelings to lower levels, rather than getting rid of them entirely, as you can see in the “% Goal” column of his Daily Mood Log. Then they moved on to M = Methods, focusing first on Neil’s Negative Thought (NT): “I’m not capable of getting organized. After identifying a number of distortions in the thought, Neil was able to generate a positive thought that fulfilled the necessary and sufficient conditions for emotional change: The Positive Thought (PT) has to be 100% true. The PT has to drastically lower your belief in the Negative Thought. You can see this on his DML. David and Neil used a variety of techniques, including Externalization of Voices, to challenge the rest of his NTs. Neil re-rated his negative feelings at the end of the session. They all feel to zero except feeling alone, which went from 80 to 5, which was his goal. Rhonda and David

101 min3 d ago
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Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 2: "Wow! The Changes Were Real!"

Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 1: "I'm failing! I'm overwhelmed!"

Rhonda begins with a plug for David’s new book, Feeling Great, which will be released on Amazon, on September 15, the day after after this podcast will be published. You can check it out at the link at the bottom of today's show notes. Today and next week you will hear parts 1 and 2 of a live therapy session I (David) did with Neil Sattin, host of his own terrific “Relationship Alive” podcast, which has received 5 million downloads. But as you know, we all sometimes need a little mental tune-up, including therapists. The session you are about to hear occurred on March 23, 2020, when the pandemic shut-down first occurred. Rhonda begins today’s podcast with a moving email from a fan who heard Neil's live therapy session with David on Neil’s Relationship Alive podcast. Then Neil explains how his work on troubled relationships were born out of his work as a dog trainer, and he saw many similarities with relationship issues! In addition to hosting his popular podcast, Nel does coaching for individuals and troubled couples. Neil explains that, “I’ve always been a person who people have turned to for relationship help. I saw the struggles my parents experienced, and I have experienced my own struggles, and I wanted to figure out how we might use struggles to deepen and improve relationships, so people can thrive and get past those challenging moments. Prior to his personal work with David, Neil sought help from a cognitive therapist, but it wasn’t helpful thought. Neil thought it was too formulaic, a sentiment that David agrees with. Neil prefers working “in the moment,” the way David does therapy. Today, you will hear the T = Testing and E = Empathy portions of Neil’s TEAM therapy session with David, and next week you will hear the A = Assessment of Resistance and M = Methods portions. You can check out the Daily Mood Log that David and Neil filled out at the beginning of session. As you can see, the upsetting event was simply feeling like he hadn’t gotten enough done when evening approached. Perhaps you’ve sometimes felt like that, too! You can also see that Neil had many negative feelings. Most were intense and Neil felt overwhelmed. He was telling himself there was way too much to do, that he was incapable of getting organized, and that he was going to end up unhealthy, weak and broke. These were messages he’d heard from his dad when he was growing up: “You’ve gotta clean your room. . . You’ll never succeed.” Tearfully, Neil says, “I’ve always wanted his blessing. . . but I’ve never gotten it. I wish he could see my role in the world, the impact I’ve been making, and I wish he would admire it! . . . I love him dearly, but there are things I just don’t understand, things that have been the sources of my sadness and anger ” Tune in next week for the exciting conclusion of the session! Rhonda and David

61 min1 w ago
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Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 1: "I'm failing! I'm overwhelmed!"

Ask David: Is Love An Adult Human Need? What Do You Do When Someone Won't Stop Asking Questions?

Ask David What do you do when someone won’t stop asking questions? Hello David, It’s been a while since I’ve emailed you, but that’s because I’ve been doing really well thanks to you! I started a new job 3-1/2 months ago, & this woman seemed to take to me right from the start. It was nice at first having someone to talk to etc, but it has quickly turned bad. She sits in the cubicle right next to me. All day long she talks to me asking me questions. What did I do after work? Who was I with? How long was I gone? What did my husband do? And on & on. It feels like she’s interrogating me because the questions never stop. I’m trying to get more vague with my answers hoping if will deter the conversation, but no luck. It really becomes distracting at times & then other times it just feels like she’s being nosy & freaks me out. I just want her to leave me alone! I think this would be a good opportunity to use the 5 secrets of effective communication, but I’m struggling. Could you help? Thank you, Brittany Hi Brittany, Will send to Rhonda for an Ask David. But a simple approach would be to tell her that you admire her and appreciate her interest, but that you sometimes find the questions distracting from doing your work. Perhaps you could sit down with her for lunch or something, and then use your five secrets skills. Using the relationship journal, you could write down one thing she said to you, and exactly what you said next. Then we can see exactly what you are doing that is fueling the problem! I've attached one, and you could send it to us after you have completed Steps 1 and 2. David Thank you for the reply! It really made my day. I attached the relationship journal. It was actually more helpful than I thought it would be for this situation. Once I was able to think of a good example, I realized that maybe my lack of inquiry or showing interest in her is causing her to ask me all these questions. Although if I ask her more about herself, I don't know if it would result in her talking even more? Hard to say. Thanks for your help, and I appreciate your thoughts on my relationship journal. -Brittany Hello, Wanted to give you an update on how it went using the five secrets. First thing Monday morning my coworker started right up with the questions. I used the five secrets & said something similar to what I wrote to you. She apologized for bothering me, & things have been great all week! She actually brought in headphones & has been listening to music now. And there’s no tension or animosity between us which was my fear initially. We still chat here & there & are friendly. Thanks again! -Brittany How can a pastoral counselor get training in TEAM-CBT? Dear Doctor David, I am a pastor from South Africa, married to an Australian, living in Dubai :) I was struggling with mild depression & came across your book "feeling good" and read it & applied all your techniques & it has been life-changing - THANK YOU! What surprised me most was the simplicity and effectiveness of the exercises. I believe that much of whatyou teach is life skills everyone should have! I wish I was taught these things when I was younger! Over the years I have helped people, from all walks of life - inmates, students, business people, etc., but primarily from a spiritual perspective. I believe I can be more effective and help so many more out there if I learn how to apply your exercises to others. I would love to train in TEAM and learn how to apply these techniques with the people I minister to, but I am not a psychologist or certified as per your requirements. I realize practice and critical feedback is paramount in order to get really good in TEAM. Please adviseme on an alternative route. Any help with this regard would be highly appreciated! Thanking you in advance. Yours sincerely, Gareth Noble Hi Pastor Noble, Sure there is a certification program at the Feeling Good Institute. I believe pastoral counselors would be very welcome. They offer many online i

43 min2 w ago
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Ask David: Is Love An Adult Human Need? What Do You Do When Someone Won't Stop Asking Questions?

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Blame

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Focuses on Blame This is the final podcast on the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit. Today, we focus on techniques to combat Blame. There are two common forms of Blame, and both can be deadly. Self-Blame: You beat up on yourself and blame yourself for things. Self-Blame is nearly always accompanied with self-directed Should Statements: “I really screwed up. I shouldn’t have done that!” Self-Blame triggers depression, worthlessness, and guilt, and sometimes triggers feelings of hopelessness and suicidal urges. Other-Blame: You beat up on others and blame them for the problems in your relationships. Other-Blame is nearly always accompanied with other-directed Should Statements: “He’s such a loser. He shouldn’t have such ridiculous beliefs!” Other-Blame triggers anger and conflict in relationships, and can sometimes trigger rage, violence, and even murder. Rhonda describes going on a bicycle trip with her husband. But when they got to the trailhead, they realized that her husband had put the wrong bicycle for Rhonda on their car. Sadly, the much-anticipated bicycle ride was ruined, and Rhonda began fuming and blaming her husband for having made this mistake. but then she decided to back off and think about her own role in the problem, and soon they were bake in a loving mood again. Unfortunately, for many people, the outcome is different, with escalating arguments and lasting feelings of resentment and indignance. David describes his work with a married woman who blamed herself for sexual difficulties and a history of sexual abuse as a child, who stood in front of a mirror with a razor blade to her neck the night before her first session with David. She was debating, “Should I just slit my throat and get it over with, or should I show up for my session in the morning?” Rhonda presses David for details about the treatment, which had a glorious outcome. David also gives a dramatic example of Other-Blame—a man who shot two obnoxious and aggressive teenage boys with his crossbow during a road rage incident. He shot one of the boys through the heart, and he fell and bled to death. Then he shot the other boy through the spinal column, and that boy survived but ended up paralyzed for life. The man was arrested and given a life sentence in prison. When interviewed by a television reporter and asked if he had any remorse or regrets, the man said, “Regrets! Hell no! That was the greatest accomplishment of my life! I think about constantly and it makes me euphoric. If I had the chance, I’d do the exact same thing again!” And that the huge problem with Other-Blame. Although negative thoughts containing Other-Blame are nearly always extremely distorted, just like the thoughts that cause depression, thoughts with Other-Blame trigger feelings of moral superiority and anger that can be extremely addictive. That’s why anger and relationship conflicts can be way harder to treat than depression and self-blame. One potentially helpful technique is a Blame Cost-Benefit Analysis, listing all the many advantages and benefits of blaming others for your problems and relationship conflicts. Once you’ve seen all the benefits, you can list the disadvantages, and then balance them against each other on a 100-point scale. if the advantages of blame are greater, there’s no reason to change. If you’re interested, you can check out this link to a Blame CBAthat my daughter and I prepared. Check it out! David explains how he used this technique to help a physician with chronic, refractory depression and episodic rage attacks in a single therapy session! It’s a great technique to try if you’re feeling unhappy and blaming others for the problems in your relationships with them. Rhonda and I have enjoyed creating this series for you. If there are other series you’d like to hear, let us know. For example, we could have a series of podcasts on all the different kinds of anxiety, illustrating the most helpful techniqu

31 min3 w ago
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Blame

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Should Statements

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Continues with Should Statements Rhonda begins by reading a beautiful email from one of our listeners, and I give a brief shout out for my new book, Feeling Great, which can be pre-ordered on Amazon now (see below for the link). Thanks to your support, as of today (July 2) it is already the #1 best seller in the Amazon depression AND anxiety categories for impending new books! David and Rhonda briefly summarize the history of Should Statements, starting with the Buddha 2500 years ago, and culminating in the work of Karen Horney and Albert Ellis in the 20th century. They both emphasized that nearly all emotional suffering as well as relationship conflict results from “Shoulds.” David and Rhonda describe the four categories of Should Statements: Shoulds directed against yourself cause depression, anxiety, guilt, and shame. and even lead to suicidal urges. Should directed against others cause anger, and can even lead to violence. Shoulds directed against the world cause frustration. Hidden Shoulds. They also describe the three valid types of Should Statements: Moral Shoulds Legal Shoulds Laws of the Universe Shoulds David and Rhonda provide vignettes illustrating the tremendous emotional damage that can result from “Shoulds” and describe a number of strategies for combating them, including: Positive Reframing the Semantic Technique Socratic Questioning the Acceptance Paradox The final podcast in this series will focus on the two types of Blame: Self-Blame, which nearly always marches hand-in-hand with Self-Directed Shoulds Other-Blame, which nearly always marches hand-in-hand with Other-Directed Shoulds Rhonda and David

44 minAUG 24
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Should Statements

Meet the Amazing Dr. Alex Clarke!

Today we feature a brilliant and beloved colleague, Dr. Alex Clarke. At the start of today’s podcast, Alex describes his unexpected journey from psychoanalysis / psychodynamic therapy to TEAM, but discovered that TEAM can actually be viewed as a type of psychoanalytic therapy. In fact, the two fathers of cognitive therapy, Albert Ellis, PhD, and Aaron Beck, MD, began their careers as psychoanalysts. They were simply looking for specific techniques to help their patients develop rapid and tangible change, and not just understanding that unfolds over a period of years. David and Alex discuss some of the surprising overlaps between TEAM and psychodynamic therapy, as well as some of the striking differences. Similarities Changing the Focus: Often there’s tension in the room, especially during therapy sessions. When you bring it to conscious awareness in a kindly way, it will often lead to therapeutic breakthrough. The Relationship Journal: This is a rapid way to highlight the recurrin...

44 minAUG 17
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Meet the Amazing Dr. Alex Clarke!

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Emotional Reasoning

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Continues with Emotional Reasoning Rhonda begins by reading a beautiful emails from a listener who was greatly inspired and helped by the personal work Marilyn Coffee did on several previous podcast. I also give a brief shout out for my new book, Feeling Great, which can be pre-ordered on Amazon now (see below for the link). Rhonda and David begin with a brief overview of Emotional Reasoning. this is a term i coined when I first created the list of ten cognitive distortions in the mid-to late 1970s. There is the definition: Emotional Reasoning is when you reason from how you feel. Here are several examples: “I feel like a loser, so I must really be a loser.” “Ifeelhopeless, so I mustbehopeless.” “I feelanxious, so I must bein danger.” “I feellike a bad therapist, so I must really beone." “I feeljudged. This means that people are judging me.” “I feelguilty. This means that I did something bad.” Emotional Reasoning is a distortion because your feelings all result from your thoughts. And if your thoughts are distorted, then your emotions / feelings will not reflect reality. Sometimes, your feelings are no more realistic than the images you see in funhouse mirrors in an amusement park. This is worth knowing because for decades mental health professionals have promoted the ideas that getting in touch with your feelings is the key to mental health. There's truth in everything, and this is sometimes true. Being open with your feelings can be an important key to intimacy and to genuine relationships with others. But your feelings can also deceive you. For example, the feeling of hopelessness is always based on distortions and is never true. But sometimes believe it so strongly that they attempt suicide as the only escape from their suffering. David and Rhonda discuss examples of emotional reasoning and the techniques that can be helpful, including, but not limited to: The Double Standard Technique The Socratic Method Truth Based Techniques, such as: Examine the Evidence The Experimental Technique The Survey Technique David describes a father who was convinced he was a bad father because he shouted at his sons, and Rhonda describes an aspiring writer she recently treated who felt like she was dull and unimportant prior to a meeting with prospective agents. We are nearing the end of the distortion series, but still have two mega-important distortions to discuss: Should Statements Blame David mentions that Emotional Reasoning is not only important in emotional problems like depression and anxiety, but also in anger and conflict with others, as well as racial and religious bias. You feel like other racial or religious groups are inferior, and you feel superior, so you think you are right! Thank so much for listening. If you like our podcasts, tell your friends, colleagues, and patients about them! This is all volunteer work, so our only marketing budget is your good will. Each month our downloads are increasing, thanks to you, and we will hit three million downloads early next year or late this year. Rhonda and David

34 minAUG 10
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Emotional Reasoning

202: Ask David. Are depression and anxiety really states of self-hypnosis? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin?

Today, Rhonda and David discuss seven great questions submitted by podcast fans like you! Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe, can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Do you have to work on your negative thoughts the moment they appear? What role, from your years of practice, does spirituality have in the psychotherapy? Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? Hi David, I have two questions after listening to Corona Cast 7: “My Struggle with Covid-19! Is it REALLY True that only Our Thoughts Can Upset Us?” I was struck by thinking of anxiety as the result of hypnotizing ourselves into believing our fears. Can depression by thought of in a similar way, except that we hypnotize ourselves into believing our distorted thoughts about ourselves? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Can you do an episode about how to deal with unpleasant somatic situations, as Michael was experiencing during the recording, that suggest there might be some psychological distress but don't seem to have thoughts associated with them? Thanks! Hi Derek, Another great couple of questions, thanks! Will add these to the next Ask David podcast, but the short story is yes, for sure—both depression and anxiety can be thought of as states of self-hypnosis, or trances, because you believe the messages you give yourself, (eg your negative thoughts) that are not true. I think one could add other positive and negative emotions to the list as well, including anger--believing the other person really IS wrong, bad, inferior, and so forth--as well as mania and narcissism, telling yourself that you really ARE a superior person, etc. This is a hugely important topic, and "emotional reasoning" fuels these trances: I FEEL worthless / inferior, so I must BE worthless / inferior, and so forth. With regard to your second question, you might want to listen to yesterday’s live session with Sarah, (Podcast 193, https://feelinggood.com/category/dr-davids-blogs/feeling-good-podcast/) since it focuses on intense somatic sensations generated by emotions, and you can actually hear the exact moment of recovery, when the physical sensations disappeared. David Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? Hi Dr. Burns, Do you honestly think what Hitler and Stalin did should be forgiven? Albert Ellis said one should. I disagree! Tom Hi Tom, I only help people with problems they are asking for help with. I am not an evangelist or moral authority! David What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? A new comment on the post "Uncovering Self-Defeating Beliefs (SDBs)--For Therapists (and Interested Patients) Only!"/ Hi Dr. Burns, Awesome blog post! Your accessible and kind demeanor shine through clearly. What if a client feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Holly Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Hi Doctor Burns, My name is Jasmine, and I just started going back to therapy about a year ago. I have really improved, and both my mom AND my therapist recommended you HIGHLY. I’m a millennial and I’m just happy you are still alive! I also wanted to ask, do you still really believe even today that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe can treated even without the use of prescription drugs? I am asking because I just bought about three of your books and want to make sure that your confidence in these theories has not wavered. Sometimes I feel like a lost cause because this is the first time in my life that I am truly dealing with and facing my own problems instead of turning the other cheek. Also, how are you doing, sir? Jasmine Hi Jasmine, Doing great, thanks! The new techniques have add

41 minAUG 3
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202: Ask David. Are depression and anxiety really states of self-hypnosis? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin?

Can’t horrible events upset you directly? What if a patient falls in love with you? What's the best way to handle a critical boss?

Today, Rhonda and David discuss three great questions submitted by podcast fans like you! This thoughtful question is from our beloved Rhonda! . . . And the answer may surprise you! When something terrible happens, like being raped or having your house burn down, or being a victim of racial discrimination, doesn’t the event itself upset you? Do you really have to have a negative thought before you can feel anger, fear, grief, or worthlessness? Hi David! For example, if our house burned down and we lost everything, or we or someone we loved was raped--doesn't the event affect you directly? Do you really have to have negative thoughts before you can feel sad, depressed, anxious or angry? Do all of our feelings REALLY result from our thoughts? What about people who have been treated unfairly or been discriminated against because of their race, religion, gender identity, etc. Aren't their feelings a direct result of their experience and not just their thoughts? Rhonda What do you do when patients fall in love with you? Hi David and Rhonda, My name is Ben and I live in Maryland. I started listening to the feeling good podcast about 3 years ago when I was in a period of life transition. The podcast has been incredibly helpful to me as I dealt with my childhood trauma, explored my motivations and drives for life, and reoriented my personal relationships and career, away from what I thought I should be doing, toward what I love and deeply want for my life. In part because of the podcast's inspiration, I have decided to pursue a master’s degree in social work, and hope to become a psychotherapist. Thank you for all that you do, and the amazing help you have been to me personally. I do have one question. In one past episode. You mentioned the possibility of using five secrets to defuse the situation when a patient falls in love with the therapist because they feel understood and cared for. This has happened to me a few times when I talk with a friend about their personal difficulties, and they begin to develop feelings for me. I would like to keep these relationships friendships, rather than romantic. I would love to have your advice on how best to both inoculate against and resolve such situations. Thank you again. Ben What can you if your boss is not empathic? Hi Dr. Burns, You guys are always so good at empathy. I’d love to hear one day your method about how to cope when there is lack of empathy, but you still have to keep a relation. For example: when your boss doesn’t empathize with you and his message makes you feel bad, but you still need the job. I had an experience like that and it really hurt the ego. Cheers, David. Have a great day! Andres Hi Andres, One can always learn a lot from one exchange with the boss. What did he say and what, exactly did you say next? Waiting for empathy from others is never something I have recommended! That’s a really long wait! But you CAN discover how you are provoking the very problem you are complaining about if you have the courage. This empowers YOU to change. David Questions on the next Ask David: Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe, can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Do you have to work on your negative thoughts the moment they appear? What role, from your years of practice, does spirituality have in the psychotherapy? Rhonda and David

35 minJUL 27
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Can’t horrible events upset you directly? What if a patient falls in love with you? What's the best way to handle a critical boss?

Meet Linda Jackson -- Publisher of David's New Book, Feeling Great

Podcast #200: Meet Linda Jackson! We celebrated our one hundredth podcast with an interview with Professor Mark Noble, who talked about TEAM-CBT and the brain. Today, we celebrate our two hundredth podcast with another special guest, Linda Jackson, the publisher at PESI Publishing and Media Company. You may know of PESI for their work in continuing education programs as well as training products for mental health professionals.You may not be aware that PESI is the publisher of my new book, Feeling Great, which will be released in September, 2020. One focus of our interview with Linda was the teamwork that is so important between any author and his or her publisher, as well as the editor. I have been really thrilled with the incredible teamwork and support that PESI has provided on this project, under Linda’s skillful leadership. That was my strong motivation in selecting PESI, and I’m really glad I made this choice. It will be their first general public “self-help” book, and I hope it is a huge success for them, and for me! Rhonda asks how this book compares with my first book, Feeling Good. It is the first true sequel, although I have written many spin-off books based on the cognitive therapy techniques I first described in Feeling Good. But now, after 40,000 therapy sessions with individuals struggling with mild to extreme depression and anxiety, as well as four decades of research on how psychotherapy actually works, I have many powerful new techniques that you can learn about in Feeling Great. Feeling Great is based on the TEAM-CBT that has evolved in the past ten to fifteen years in my weekly psychotherapy training and development group at Stanford. My book Feeling Good was about cognitions, and how to crush distorted thoughts. What I have learned over the past 40 years of practice, research and teaching is that cognitions, while massively important, are not the only dimension in change. Of course, it is still true that when you change the way you think, you can change the way you feel, but now there is another powerful component: many people seem, tp get stuck in depression or anxiety and resist change. They sometimes “yes-but” their therapists and often fail to do psychotherapy homework between sessions. Why? In Feeling Great, you will discover why people resist change and you will also learn how to eliminate resistance. The developments have ushered in the era of ultra-rapid recovery from depression and anxiety. Therapists who are interested in learning these new techniques will now have a clear guide, and members of the general public who are struggling with negative feelings will have the chance to use these techniques on their own, whether or not they are in treatment with a therapist. Linda talks about her personal history and how she happened to find a career in publishing. She describes her passion for writing, journalism and editing, going all the way back to her teenage years, something that I can totally identify with. Linda also describes her background in marketing, and her appreciation of its importance. You could have the greatest book in the world, but without a strong marketing effort, it will just sit on bookstore shelves unnoticed. Linda explained that PESI has been absolutely committed to publishing practical guides that therapists can use to improve their clinical work. But now, PESI is branching into publishing books for the general public as well, because people want answers to their questions of how to deal with feelings of depression, anxiety, and inadequacy. Linda said that PESI was not looking to publish a self-help book, but when someone in their organization heard that David was looking for a publisher, they felt it was “meant to be” that they would publish his new book. Linda believes that this book is going to help so many people who want to “feel great.” Something I (David) have deeply appreciated about working with Linda and her PESI team has been the comradery of the writing, e

36 minJUL 20
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Meet Linda Jackson -- Publisher of David's New Book, Feeling Great

Latest Episodes

Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 2: "Wow! The Changes Were Real!"

Last week you heard Part 1 of David’s TEAM Therapy session with Neil Sattin, who became pretty despondent and discouraged right after the first shut down because of the covid-19 pandemic in March of 2020. David and Neil went through the T = Testing and E = Empathy parts of TEAM, and David helped Neil develop a Daily Mood Log so he could record his negative thoughts and feelings at one specific moment at the end of a day when he was feeling like he hadn’t gotten enough work done. Perhaps you’ve had the same problem at times! Today you’ll hear the A = Assessment of Resistance and M = Methods parts of the session. As they begin, David asks Neil the Magic Button and Miracle Cure questions, and Neil says that he definitely does want help and would push the Magic Button to make all of his negative thoughts and feelings on his Daily Mood Log disappear. David cautions against that and suggests Positive Reframing, asking two questions about each negative thought and feeling. What does this thought or feeling show about you that’s positive and awesome? What are some potential benefits, or advantages, of this thought or feeling? Here’s Neil’s list of Positives: My sadness: Shows that I’m ambitious Motivates me to achieve a lot Shows that I have high standards My anxiety: Shows that I’m responsible Keeps me vigilant Fuels me to take action Reminds me that I’m doing important things My guilt: Shows that I have a moral compass My feelings of defectiveness and inadequacy: Show that I want to be a good role model Show that I’m willing to be honest about my flaws Show that I hold myself accountable Show that I’m humble My feelings of being alone show that: I value connections with others Allow me to feel close to people My feelings of embarrassment and humiliation show that: I have high standards and goals I want my life to mean something I value acceptance My discouragement shows that: I have a vision I’m realistic about the many challenges I face and the sheer volume of work I have to do I’m willing to face the truth My frustration shows that: I’ll persevere. I won’t stop and give up. Feeling annoyed and irritated: Shows that I won’t tolerate things that get in my way Gives me energy and determination Feeling overwhelmed: Reminds me that I might be taking on too much Protects me from trying and failing Shows that I’m looking for ways to take care of myself. After listing these positives, Neil used the Magic Dial and indicated that he’d like to dial down his negative feelings to lower levels, rather than getting rid of them entirely, as you can see in the “% Goal” column of his Daily Mood Log. Then they moved on to M = Methods, focusing first on Neil’s Negative Thought (NT): “I’m not capable of getting organized. After identifying a number of distortions in the thought, Neil was able to generate a positive thought that fulfilled the necessary and sufficient conditions for emotional change: The Positive Thought (PT) has to be 100% true. The PT has to drastically lower your belief in the Negative Thought. You can see this on his DML. David and Neil used a variety of techniques, including Externalization of Voices, to challenge the rest of his NTs. Neil re-rated his negative feelings at the end of the session. They all feel to zero except feeling alone, which went from 80 to 5, which was his goal. Rhonda and David

101 min3 d ago
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Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 2: "Wow! The Changes Were Real!"

Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 1: "I'm failing! I'm overwhelmed!"

Rhonda begins with a plug for David’s new book, Feeling Great, which will be released on Amazon, on September 15, the day after after this podcast will be published. You can check it out at the link at the bottom of today's show notes. Today and next week you will hear parts 1 and 2 of a live therapy session I (David) did with Neil Sattin, host of his own terrific “Relationship Alive” podcast, which has received 5 million downloads. But as you know, we all sometimes need a little mental tune-up, including therapists. The session you are about to hear occurred on March 23, 2020, when the pandemic shut-down first occurred. Rhonda begins today’s podcast with a moving email from a fan who heard Neil's live therapy session with David on Neil’s Relationship Alive podcast. Then Neil explains how his work on troubled relationships were born out of his work as a dog trainer, and he saw many similarities with relationship issues! In addition to hosting his popular podcast, Nel does coaching for individuals and troubled couples. Neil explains that, “I’ve always been a person who people have turned to for relationship help. I saw the struggles my parents experienced, and I have experienced my own struggles, and I wanted to figure out how we might use struggles to deepen and improve relationships, so people can thrive and get past those challenging moments. Prior to his personal work with David, Neil sought help from a cognitive therapist, but it wasn’t helpful thought. Neil thought it was too formulaic, a sentiment that David agrees with. Neil prefers working “in the moment,” the way David does therapy. Today, you will hear the T = Testing and E = Empathy portions of Neil’s TEAM therapy session with David, and next week you will hear the A = Assessment of Resistance and M = Methods portions. You can check out the Daily Mood Log that David and Neil filled out at the beginning of session. As you can see, the upsetting event was simply feeling like he hadn’t gotten enough done when evening approached. Perhaps you’ve sometimes felt like that, too! You can also see that Neil had many negative feelings. Most were intense and Neil felt overwhelmed. He was telling himself there was way too much to do, that he was incapable of getting organized, and that he was going to end up unhealthy, weak and broke. These were messages he’d heard from his dad when he was growing up: “You’ve gotta clean your room. . . You’ll never succeed.” Tearfully, Neil says, “I’ve always wanted his blessing. . . but I’ve never gotten it. I wish he could see my role in the world, the impact I’ve been making, and I wish he would admire it! . . . I love him dearly, but there are things I just don’t understand, things that have been the sources of my sadness and anger ” Tune in next week for the exciting conclusion of the session! Rhonda and David

61 min1 w ago
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Live Therapy with Neil Sattin, part 1: "I'm failing! I'm overwhelmed!"

Ask David: Is Love An Adult Human Need? What Do You Do When Someone Won't Stop Asking Questions?

Ask David What do you do when someone won’t stop asking questions? Hello David, It’s been a while since I’ve emailed you, but that’s because I’ve been doing really well thanks to you! I started a new job 3-1/2 months ago, & this woman seemed to take to me right from the start. It was nice at first having someone to talk to etc, but it has quickly turned bad. She sits in the cubicle right next to me. All day long she talks to me asking me questions. What did I do after work? Who was I with? How long was I gone? What did my husband do? And on & on. It feels like she’s interrogating me because the questions never stop. I’m trying to get more vague with my answers hoping if will deter the conversation, but no luck. It really becomes distracting at times & then other times it just feels like she’s being nosy & freaks me out. I just want her to leave me alone! I think this would be a good opportunity to use the 5 secrets of effective communication, but I’m struggling. Could you help? Thank you, Brittany Hi Brittany, Will send to Rhonda for an Ask David. But a simple approach would be to tell her that you admire her and appreciate her interest, but that you sometimes find the questions distracting from doing your work. Perhaps you could sit down with her for lunch or something, and then use your five secrets skills. Using the relationship journal, you could write down one thing she said to you, and exactly what you said next. Then we can see exactly what you are doing that is fueling the problem! I've attached one, and you could send it to us after you have completed Steps 1 and 2. David Thank you for the reply! It really made my day. I attached the relationship journal. It was actually more helpful than I thought it would be for this situation. Once I was able to think of a good example, I realized that maybe my lack of inquiry or showing interest in her is causing her to ask me all these questions. Although if I ask her more about herself, I don't know if it would result in her talking even more? Hard to say. Thanks for your help, and I appreciate your thoughts on my relationship journal. -Brittany Hello, Wanted to give you an update on how it went using the five secrets. First thing Monday morning my coworker started right up with the questions. I used the five secrets & said something similar to what I wrote to you. She apologized for bothering me, & things have been great all week! She actually brought in headphones & has been listening to music now. And there’s no tension or animosity between us which was my fear initially. We still chat here & there & are friendly. Thanks again! -Brittany How can a pastoral counselor get training in TEAM-CBT? Dear Doctor David, I am a pastor from South Africa, married to an Australian, living in Dubai :) I was struggling with mild depression & came across your book "feeling good" and read it & applied all your techniques & it has been life-changing - THANK YOU! What surprised me most was the simplicity and effectiveness of the exercises. I believe that much of whatyou teach is life skills everyone should have! I wish I was taught these things when I was younger! Over the years I have helped people, from all walks of life - inmates, students, business people, etc., but primarily from a spiritual perspective. I believe I can be more effective and help so many more out there if I learn how to apply your exercises to others. I would love to train in TEAM and learn how to apply these techniques with the people I minister to, but I am not a psychologist or certified as per your requirements. I realize practice and critical feedback is paramount in order to get really good in TEAM. Please adviseme on an alternative route. Any help with this regard would be highly appreciated! Thanking you in advance. Yours sincerely, Gareth Noble Hi Pastor Noble, Sure there is a certification program at the Feeling Good Institute. I believe pastoral counselors would be very welcome. They offer many online i

43 min2 w ago
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Ask David: Is Love An Adult Human Need? What Do You Do When Someone Won't Stop Asking Questions?

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Blame

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Focuses on Blame This is the final podcast on the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit. Today, we focus on techniques to combat Blame. There are two common forms of Blame, and both can be deadly. Self-Blame: You beat up on yourself and blame yourself for things. Self-Blame is nearly always accompanied with self-directed Should Statements: “I really screwed up. I shouldn’t have done that!” Self-Blame triggers depression, worthlessness, and guilt, and sometimes triggers feelings of hopelessness and suicidal urges. Other-Blame: You beat up on others and blame them for the problems in your relationships. Other-Blame is nearly always accompanied with other-directed Should Statements: “He’s such a loser. He shouldn’t have such ridiculous beliefs!” Other-Blame triggers anger and conflict in relationships, and can sometimes trigger rage, violence, and even murder. Rhonda describes going on a bicycle trip with her husband. But when they got to the trailhead, they realized that her husband had put the wrong bicycle for Rhonda on their car. Sadly, the much-anticipated bicycle ride was ruined, and Rhonda began fuming and blaming her husband for having made this mistake. but then she decided to back off and think about her own role in the problem, and soon they were bake in a loving mood again. Unfortunately, for many people, the outcome is different, with escalating arguments and lasting feelings of resentment and indignance. David describes his work with a married woman who blamed herself for sexual difficulties and a history of sexual abuse as a child, who stood in front of a mirror with a razor blade to her neck the night before her first session with David. She was debating, “Should I just slit my throat and get it over with, or should I show up for my session in the morning?” Rhonda presses David for details about the treatment, which had a glorious outcome. David also gives a dramatic example of Other-Blame—a man who shot two obnoxious and aggressive teenage boys with his crossbow during a road rage incident. He shot one of the boys through the heart, and he fell and bled to death. Then he shot the other boy through the spinal column, and that boy survived but ended up paralyzed for life. The man was arrested and given a life sentence in prison. When interviewed by a television reporter and asked if he had any remorse or regrets, the man said, “Regrets! Hell no! That was the greatest accomplishment of my life! I think about constantly and it makes me euphoric. If I had the chance, I’d do the exact same thing again!” And that the huge problem with Other-Blame. Although negative thoughts containing Other-Blame are nearly always extremely distorted, just like the thoughts that cause depression, thoughts with Other-Blame trigger feelings of moral superiority and anger that can be extremely addictive. That’s why anger and relationship conflicts can be way harder to treat than depression and self-blame. One potentially helpful technique is a Blame Cost-Benefit Analysis, listing all the many advantages and benefits of blaming others for your problems and relationship conflicts. Once you’ve seen all the benefits, you can list the disadvantages, and then balance them against each other on a 100-point scale. if the advantages of blame are greater, there’s no reason to change. If you’re interested, you can check out this link to a Blame CBAthat my daughter and I prepared. Check it out! David explains how he used this technique to help a physician with chronic, refractory depression and episodic rage attacks in a single therapy session! It’s a great technique to try if you’re feeling unhappy and blaming others for the problems in your relationships with them. Rhonda and I have enjoyed creating this series for you. If there are other series you’d like to hear, let us know. For example, we could have a series of podcasts on all the different kinds of anxiety, illustrating the most helpful techniqu

31 min3 w ago
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Blame

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Should Statements

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Continues with Should Statements Rhonda begins by reading a beautiful email from one of our listeners, and I give a brief shout out for my new book, Feeling Great, which can be pre-ordered on Amazon now (see below for the link). Thanks to your support, as of today (July 2) it is already the #1 best seller in the Amazon depression AND anxiety categories for impending new books! David and Rhonda briefly summarize the history of Should Statements, starting with the Buddha 2500 years ago, and culminating in the work of Karen Horney and Albert Ellis in the 20th century. They both emphasized that nearly all emotional suffering as well as relationship conflict results from “Shoulds.” David and Rhonda describe the four categories of Should Statements: Shoulds directed against yourself cause depression, anxiety, guilt, and shame. and even lead to suicidal urges. Should directed against others cause anger, and can even lead to violence. Shoulds directed against the world cause frustration. Hidden Shoulds. They also describe the three valid types of Should Statements: Moral Shoulds Legal Shoulds Laws of the Universe Shoulds David and Rhonda provide vignettes illustrating the tremendous emotional damage that can result from “Shoulds” and describe a number of strategies for combating them, including: Positive Reframing the Semantic Technique Socratic Questioning the Acceptance Paradox The final podcast in this series will focus on the two types of Blame: Self-Blame, which nearly always marches hand-in-hand with Self-Directed Shoulds Other-Blame, which nearly always marches hand-in-hand with Other-Directed Shoulds Rhonda and David

44 minAUG 24
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Should Statements

Meet the Amazing Dr. Alex Clarke!

Today we feature a brilliant and beloved colleague, Dr. Alex Clarke. At the start of today’s podcast, Alex describes his unexpected journey from psychoanalysis / psychodynamic therapy to TEAM, but discovered that TEAM can actually be viewed as a type of psychoanalytic therapy. In fact, the two fathers of cognitive therapy, Albert Ellis, PhD, and Aaron Beck, MD, began their careers as psychoanalysts. They were simply looking for specific techniques to help their patients develop rapid and tangible change, and not just understanding that unfolds over a period of years. David and Alex discuss some of the surprising overlaps between TEAM and psychodynamic therapy, as well as some of the striking differences. Similarities Changing the Focus: Often there’s tension in the room, especially during therapy sessions. When you bring it to conscious awareness in a kindly way, it will often lead to therapeutic breakthrough. The Relationship Journal: This is a rapid way to highlight the recurrin...

44 minAUG 17
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Meet the Amazing Dr. Alex Clarke!

How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Emotional Reasoning

Today, the Cognitive Distortion Starter Kit Continues with Emotional Reasoning Rhonda begins by reading a beautiful emails from a listener who was greatly inspired and helped by the personal work Marilyn Coffee did on several previous podcast. I also give a brief shout out for my new book, Feeling Great, which can be pre-ordered on Amazon now (see below for the link). Rhonda and David begin with a brief overview of Emotional Reasoning. this is a term i coined when I first created the list of ten cognitive distortions in the mid-to late 1970s. There is the definition: Emotional Reasoning is when you reason from how you feel. Here are several examples: “I feel like a loser, so I must really be a loser.” “Ifeelhopeless, so I mustbehopeless.” “I feelanxious, so I must bein danger.” “I feellike a bad therapist, so I must really beone." “I feeljudged. This means that people are judging me.” “I feelguilty. This means that I did something bad.” Emotional Reasoning is a distortion because your feelings all result from your thoughts. And if your thoughts are distorted, then your emotions / feelings will not reflect reality. Sometimes, your feelings are no more realistic than the images you see in funhouse mirrors in an amusement park. This is worth knowing because for decades mental health professionals have promoted the ideas that getting in touch with your feelings is the key to mental health. There's truth in everything, and this is sometimes true. Being open with your feelings can be an important key to intimacy and to genuine relationships with others. But your feelings can also deceive you. For example, the feeling of hopelessness is always based on distortions and is never true. But sometimes believe it so strongly that they attempt suicide as the only escape from their suffering. David and Rhonda discuss examples of emotional reasoning and the techniques that can be helpful, including, but not limited to: The Double Standard Technique The Socratic Method Truth Based Techniques, such as: Examine the Evidence The Experimental Technique The Survey Technique David describes a father who was convinced he was a bad father because he shouted at his sons, and Rhonda describes an aspiring writer she recently treated who felt like she was dull and unimportant prior to a meeting with prospective agents. We are nearing the end of the distortion series, but still have two mega-important distortions to discuss: Should Statements Blame David mentions that Emotional Reasoning is not only important in emotional problems like depression and anxiety, but also in anger and conflict with others, as well as racial and religious bias. You feel like other racial or religious groups are inferior, and you feel superior, so you think you are right! Thank so much for listening. If you like our podcasts, tell your friends, colleagues, and patients about them! This is all volunteer work, so our only marketing budget is your good will. Each month our downloads are increasing, thanks to you, and we will hit three million downloads early next year or late this year. Rhonda and David

34 minAUG 10
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How to Crush Negative Thoughts: Emotional Reasoning

202: Ask David. Are depression and anxiety really states of self-hypnosis? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin?

Today, Rhonda and David discuss seven great questions submitted by podcast fans like you! Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe, can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Do you have to work on your negative thoughts the moment they appear? What role, from your years of practice, does spirituality have in the psychotherapy? Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? Hi David, I have two questions after listening to Corona Cast 7: “My Struggle with Covid-19! Is it REALLY True that only Our Thoughts Can Upset Us?” I was struck by thinking of anxiety as the result of hypnotizing ourselves into believing our fears. Can depression by thought of in a similar way, except that we hypnotize ourselves into believing our distorted thoughts about ourselves? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Can you do an episode about how to deal with unpleasant somatic situations, as Michael was experiencing during the recording, that suggest there might be some psychological distress but don't seem to have thoughts associated with them? Thanks! Hi Derek, Another great couple of questions, thanks! Will add these to the next Ask David podcast, but the short story is yes, for sure—both depression and anxiety can be thought of as states of self-hypnosis, or trances, because you believe the messages you give yourself, (eg your negative thoughts) that are not true. I think one could add other positive and negative emotions to the list as well, including anger--believing the other person really IS wrong, bad, inferior, and so forth--as well as mania and narcissism, telling yourself that you really ARE a superior person, etc. This is a hugely important topic, and "emotional reasoning" fuels these trances: I FEEL worthless / inferior, so I must BE worthless / inferior, and so forth. With regard to your second question, you might want to listen to yesterday’s live session with Sarah, (Podcast 193, https://feelinggood.com/category/dr-davids-blogs/feeling-good-podcast/) since it focuses on intense somatic sensations generated by emotions, and you can actually hear the exact moment of recovery, when the physical sensations disappeared. David Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? Hi Dr. Burns, Do you honestly think what Hitler and Stalin did should be forgiven? Albert Ellis said one should. I disagree! Tom Hi Tom, I only help people with problems they are asking for help with. I am not an evangelist or moral authority! David What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? A new comment on the post "Uncovering Self-Defeating Beliefs (SDBs)--For Therapists (and Interested Patients) Only!"/ Hi Dr. Burns, Awesome blog post! Your accessible and kind demeanor shine through clearly. What if a client feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Holly Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Hi Doctor Burns, My name is Jasmine, and I just started going back to therapy about a year ago. I have really improved, and both my mom AND my therapist recommended you HIGHLY. I’m a millennial and I’m just happy you are still alive! I also wanted to ask, do you still really believe even today that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe can treated even without the use of prescription drugs? I am asking because I just bought about three of your books and want to make sure that your confidence in these theories has not wavered. Sometimes I feel like a lost cause because this is the first time in my life that I am truly dealing with and facing my own problems instead of turning the other cheek. Also, how are you doing, sir? Jasmine Hi Jasmine, Doing great, thanks! The new techniques have add

41 minAUG 3
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202: Ask David. Are depression and anxiety really states of self-hypnosis? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin?

Can’t horrible events upset you directly? What if a patient falls in love with you? What's the best way to handle a critical boss?

Today, Rhonda and David discuss three great questions submitted by podcast fans like you! This thoughtful question is from our beloved Rhonda! . . . And the answer may surprise you! When something terrible happens, like being raped or having your house burn down, or being a victim of racial discrimination, doesn’t the event itself upset you? Do you really have to have a negative thought before you can feel anger, fear, grief, or worthlessness? Hi David! For example, if our house burned down and we lost everything, or we or someone we loved was raped--doesn't the event affect you directly? Do you really have to have negative thoughts before you can feel sad, depressed, anxious or angry? Do all of our feelings REALLY result from our thoughts? What about people who have been treated unfairly or been discriminated against because of their race, religion, gender identity, etc. Aren't their feelings a direct result of their experience and not just their thoughts? Rhonda What do you do when patients fall in love with you? Hi David and Rhonda, My name is Ben and I live in Maryland. I started listening to the feeling good podcast about 3 years ago when I was in a period of life transition. The podcast has been incredibly helpful to me as I dealt with my childhood trauma, explored my motivations and drives for life, and reoriented my personal relationships and career, away from what I thought I should be doing, toward what I love and deeply want for my life. In part because of the podcast's inspiration, I have decided to pursue a master’s degree in social work, and hope to become a psychotherapist. Thank you for all that you do, and the amazing help you have been to me personally. I do have one question. In one past episode. You mentioned the possibility of using five secrets to defuse the situation when a patient falls in love with the therapist because they feel understood and cared for. This has happened to me a few times when I talk with a friend about their personal difficulties, and they begin to develop feelings for me. I would like to keep these relationships friendships, rather than romantic. I would love to have your advice on how best to both inoculate against and resolve such situations. Thank you again. Ben What can you if your boss is not empathic? Hi Dr. Burns, You guys are always so good at empathy. I’d love to hear one day your method about how to cope when there is lack of empathy, but you still have to keep a relation. For example: when your boss doesn’t empathize with you and his message makes you feel bad, but you still need the job. I had an experience like that and it really hurt the ego. Cheers, David. Have a great day! Andres Hi Andres, One can always learn a lot from one exchange with the boss. What did he say and what, exactly did you say next? Waiting for empathy from others is never something I have recommended! That’s a really long wait! But you CAN discover how you are provoking the very problem you are complaining about if you have the courage. This empowers YOU to change. David Questions on the next Ask David: Are depression and anxiety states of self-hypnosis? How do you deal with somatic symptoms in TEAM? Should we forgive Hitler and Stalin? What if a patient feels stuck and unable to identify emotions? Do you still really believe that depression and anxiety, regardless how severe, can be treated even without the use of prescription drugs? Do you have to work on your negative thoughts the moment they appear? What role, from your years of practice, does spirituality have in the psychotherapy? Rhonda and David

35 minJUL 27
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Can’t horrible events upset you directly? What if a patient falls in love with you? What's the best way to handle a critical boss?

Meet Linda Jackson -- Publisher of David's New Book, Feeling Great

Podcast #200: Meet Linda Jackson! We celebrated our one hundredth podcast with an interview with Professor Mark Noble, who talked about TEAM-CBT and the brain. Today, we celebrate our two hundredth podcast with another special guest, Linda Jackson, the publisher at PESI Publishing and Media Company. You may know of PESI for their work in continuing education programs as well as training products for mental health professionals.You may not be aware that PESI is the publisher of my new book, Feeling Great, which will be released in September, 2020. One focus of our interview with Linda was the teamwork that is so important between any author and his or her publisher, as well as the editor. I have been really thrilled with the incredible teamwork and support that PESI has provided on this project, under Linda’s skillful leadership. That was my strong motivation in selecting PESI, and I’m really glad I made this choice. It will be their first general public “self-help” book, and I hope it is a huge success for them, and for me! Rhonda asks how this book compares with my first book, Feeling Good. It is the first true sequel, although I have written many spin-off books based on the cognitive therapy techniques I first described in Feeling Good. But now, after 40,000 therapy sessions with individuals struggling with mild to extreme depression and anxiety, as well as four decades of research on how psychotherapy actually works, I have many powerful new techniques that you can learn about in Feeling Great. Feeling Great is based on the TEAM-CBT that has evolved in the past ten to fifteen years in my weekly psychotherapy training and development group at Stanford. My book Feeling Good was about cognitions, and how to crush distorted thoughts. What I have learned over the past 40 years of practice, research and teaching is that cognitions, while massively important, are not the only dimension in change. Of course, it is still true that when you change the way you think, you can change the way you feel, but now there is another powerful component: many people seem, tp get stuck in depression or anxiety and resist change. They sometimes “yes-but” their therapists and often fail to do psychotherapy homework between sessions. Why? In Feeling Great, you will discover why people resist change and you will also learn how to eliminate resistance. The developments have ushered in the era of ultra-rapid recovery from depression and anxiety. Therapists who are interested in learning these new techniques will now have a clear guide, and members of the general public who are struggling with negative feelings will have the chance to use these techniques on their own, whether or not they are in treatment with a therapist. Linda talks about her personal history and how she happened to find a career in publishing. She describes her passion for writing, journalism and editing, going all the way back to her teenage years, something that I can totally identify with. Linda also describes her background in marketing, and her appreciation of its importance. You could have the greatest book in the world, but without a strong marketing effort, it will just sit on bookstore shelves unnoticed. Linda explained that PESI has been absolutely committed to publishing practical guides that therapists can use to improve their clinical work. But now, PESI is branching into publishing books for the general public as well, because people want answers to their questions of how to deal with feelings of depression, anxiety, and inadequacy. Linda said that PESI was not looking to publish a self-help book, but when someone in their organization heard that David was looking for a publisher, they felt it was “meant to be” that they would publish his new book. Linda believes that this book is going to help so many people who want to “feel great.” Something I (David) have deeply appreciated about working with Linda and her PESI team has been the comradery of the writing, e

36 minJUL 20
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Meet Linda Jackson -- Publisher of David's New Book, Feeling Great

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