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Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast

Dig Me Out

20
Followers
55
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Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast

Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast

Dig Me Out

20
Followers
55
Plays
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Weekly album reviews, interviews and roundtable discussions digging up the 90s

Latest Episodes

#489: Origins - Muse In The 90s

When they released their debut album Showbiz in the USin 1999, Muse were one of a number of bands compared to the Pablo Honey/The Bends era of Radiohead thanks to Matt Bellamy's Thom Yorke like tenor and Johnny Greenwood's guitar acrobatics. But Muse were doing it as a three-piece, and over time the band shed the unfair comparisons to forge a path that paid as much homage to the bombast of classic Queen to the aural assault of Rage Against The Machine, all the while releasing a slew of hit singles, moving from opening slots, to sheds, to arenas across the globe, and becoming one of the few bands to still carry the dying torch of rock. We revisit their debut, their early EPs, and touch on their 2000s releases to trace the origins of the band that has gained a global audience while splitting fans over their embrace of poppier and dancier material. Songs In This Episode: Muscle Museum (from Showbiz) 6:40 - Cave (from Showbiz) 17:28 - Falling Down (from Showbiz) 23:47 - Uno (from Showbi...

81 MIN3 d ago
Comments
#489: Origins - Muse In The 90s

#488: Dig by Dig with Scott Hackwith

Thanks to old friend of the show Chip Midnight, when patron Dewey Cole suggested revisiting the 1993 self-titled debut album from Dig, Chip reached out to lead singer and guitarist Scott Hackwith to have him join us to revisit this record. Dewey only came to record recently, so he provides a unique perspective of discovering an album seventeen years after its release. Chip interviewed Scott when the band was just starting out, gigging around the country with frequent stops in Ohio in the early-to-mid 1990s. Scott, who started out as a guitarist in T.S.O.L., learned to be a producer on the spot making the debut album, which led him to work on records by the Ramones, Spiritualized and other, shares stories and insights on album artwork, demo'ing tracks on a four-track machine, making music videos, and working on new Dig music. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Believe 32:22 - Let Me Know 37:24 - Feet Don't Touch The Ground 1:00:33 - Conversation Outro - Unlucky Friend Support the podcast...

86 MIN1 w ago
Comments
#488: Dig by Dig with Scott Hackwith

#487: Spanaway by Seaweed

If you've listened to this podcast long enough, you know that we are not always in agreement about what works and doesn't work for us on various albums. One of the earliest disagreements was back in Season One when we checked out the 1993 album Four by Seaweed. Thanks to a recent listener suggested poll on our Patreon site, we're back ten years later to check out the 1995 follow-up Spanaway, the band's only release on the Hollywood Records label. While the band faced the tired "sell-out"label for signing to a major, in reality, the band stayed close to what they did well - a bombastic combo of East Coast post-hardcore and PacWest grunge, with some extra nuance thanks to the skilled fingers of Andy Wallace behind the mixing board, as well as guest visits in the drum throne by Barrett Martin (of Screaming Trees)and Matt Cameron (of Soundgarden). The question remains - has anything changed in our diverging opinions? Songs In This Episode Intro - Start With 18:45 - Magic Mountainman 22:...

50 MIN2 w ago
Comments
#487: Spanaway by Seaweed

#486: Michael McDermott and Brian Koppleman revisit Gethsemane

While we have chatted with many artists over the years, rarely have we been able to get the record label perspective on the various ups and downs of the 90s. For this episode, we're lucky to get singer/songwriter Michael McDermott, who has been making records for thirty years, and the A&Rrep who helped kick off that career, Brian Koppelman. While Brian is better known for his screenwriting (Rounders, Ocean's 13)and showrunning (Billions), his life in the music industry dates back to high school with A&Rstints at Elektra Records, Giant Records, SBK Records and EMI Records. We dig into the album Michael and Brian worked on together, 1993's Gethsemane, and the various trials and tribulations of releasing a singer/songwriter album in the heyday of Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and Alice In Chains, the producer and songwriter relationship in the studio, why being too sympathetic to the artist can be a negative, and much much more. Songs In This Episode: Intro/1:47 - Just West Of Eden 1...

48 MIN3 w ago
Comments
#486: Michael McDermott and Brian Koppleman revisit Gethsemane

#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

While the 90s were dominated by the touring festival as opposed to the current day destination festival, the first half and second half had decidedly different approaches. Lollapalooza took a variety of artists from across genres with the intention of exposing artists across differing fanbases, whereas the Warped Tour, Ozzfest, H.O.R.D.E.Tour, and Lilith Fair each narrowed their focus. In the case of Lilith Fair, the simplistic history is that it was a female-centric folk tour, headlined by the likes of Sarah McLachlan, the Indigo Girls, Suzanne Vega, and Sheryl Crow. In reality, over the course of three years, the festival provided a much broader spectrum of female artists, including Queen Latifah, Bonnie Raitt, Letters To Cleo, Liz Phair, Dance Hall Crashers, K's Choice, Luscious Jackson, Nenah Cherry, The Pretenders, Missy Elliott, The Cardigans, Susanna Hoffs, Juliana Hatfield, and many many more. To help us revisit we invited back a pair of performers (Kay Hanley of Letters to ...

65 MINAPR 28
Comments
#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

#484: Less Is More by Even

Forging a sound out of American grunge and alternative along with British Invasion hooks and power pop melodies may seem like a recipe for disaster, but on their 1996 debut Less Is More, the Melbourne, Australian trio Even find the right balance. Channeling a Kurt Cobain cadence on one track and a John Lennon howl on another works best when the band keeps the songs short and tight, with plenty of catchy guitar riffs toss around. While we dug the high energy performances that pre-date the garage rock revival to come at the end of the decade, some of the production and rhythm choices (or lack of)left us wanting. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Karmic Flop 14:35 - End To End 19:45 - Don't Wait 26:02 - Eternal Teen 31:29 - No One Understands Me Outro - Dean Morris Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive atDigMeOutPodcast.com.

48 MINAPR 21
Comments
#484: Less Is More by Even

#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

Once the alternative gold rush hit for bands in the 90s, one song could make or break an album. But for every Sex And Candy, Cumbersome or Possum Kingdom, hundreds of other bands failed to make the Top 40 for a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the music. Take Vancouver, Canada's Odds, whose third album Good Weird Feeling is a smart combination of alternative guitar rock powered by two strong singers with a knack for lyrical twists. The two obvious singles, "Eat My Brain"and "Truth Untold"never found a home on American mainstream radio, and like so many of their northern counterparts, the band remains almost entirely unknown in the lower forty-eight. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Satisfied 17:41 - Oh Sorrow Oh Shame 20:55 - Break The Bed 24:56 - Truth Untold 31:07 - I Would Be Your Man Outro - Eat My Brain Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive atDigMeOutPodcast.com.

51 MINAPR 14
Comments
#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

Though not as lauded as grunge, Brit-pop, the rise of pop-punk or other 90s-centric genres, electronic music evolved throughout the decade as well thanks to subtler sounds coming out of the UK. While electronica and trip-hop each had their moments in the mainstream spotlight, groups like the brother-duo Boards of Canada from Scotland slid under the radar with slightly different takes, theirs being a more chill, downtempo approach utilizing vintage synths and drum machines, tape loops and field recordings. Music Has The Right To Children, their 1998 debut after several well-regarded singles and EPs, takes full advantage of the tools, creating atmospheric soundscapes backed by drum and bass loops that lived-in rather than dialed-up, giving the record a timeless element that so many of their contemporaries failed to achieve. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Telephasic Workshop 18:06 - Roygbiv 20:48 - Turquoise Hexagon Sun 27:09 - Aquarius Outro - Open The Light Support the podcast, join ...

45 MINAPR 7
Comments
#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

#481: Ebbhead by Nitzer Ebb

Though the mid-to-late nights are more regarded for the commercial rise of electronic music, specifically in the form of UKelectronica from the Chemical Brothers, Prodigy and others, the mainstream interest in high octane beats and synth-over-guitar was nothing new. As the 80s transitioned to the 90s, bands like Depeche Mode and New Order were firmly established global phenomenons, while up-and-comers like Ministry and Nine Inch Nails were bringing industrial sounds to the mainstream on MTV. Nitzer Ebb began in 1982 and established themselves throughout the decade as an Electronic Body Music (EBM) pillar, but when 90s arrives the band pivoted to a more pop sound, and on 1991's Ebbhead, the band fully embraced pop structure and sound, crafting catchy hooks at trimmed down lengths. But that evolution, while moderately successful in getting the band on mainstream rock radio, didn't necessarily sit well with the fans who discovered the band during their EBM period. Songs In This Episode...

45 MINMAR 31
Comments
#481: Ebbhead by Nitzer Ebb

#480: Sophomore Slump Revisited - American Highway Flower by Dada

As we have learned in our Sophomore Slump Revisited roundtable series, there are many factors and circumstances that can sink a band's second album, especially when coming off a hit single. In the case of Dada and their 1994 release American Highway Flower, the lack of an obvious radio single to match DizzKnee Land off their debut is a fair consideration. Rather than repeat a formula, the skilled trio of singer-guitarist Michael Gurley, singer-bassist Joie Calio and drummer Phil Leavitt pushed the band in a variety of directions while maintaining a more consistent sound than their first release. But pushing the envelope doesn't always result in a match with the cultural trends, and while the band flexes their muscle with harmonious power-pop and '60s psychedelic flourishes while unafraid to get extra noisy or delicately hushed. They may not have scored a Top 5 single or moved a million units with American Highway Flower, but that doesn't mean this sophomore release qualifies as a sl...

62 MINMAR 24
Comments
#480: Sophomore Slump Revisited - American Highway Flower by Dada

Latest Episodes

#489: Origins - Muse In The 90s

When they released their debut album Showbiz in the USin 1999, Muse were one of a number of bands compared to the Pablo Honey/The Bends era of Radiohead thanks to Matt Bellamy's Thom Yorke like tenor and Johnny Greenwood's guitar acrobatics. But Muse were doing it as a three-piece, and over time the band shed the unfair comparisons to forge a path that paid as much homage to the bombast of classic Queen to the aural assault of Rage Against The Machine, all the while releasing a slew of hit singles, moving from opening slots, to sheds, to arenas across the globe, and becoming one of the few bands to still carry the dying torch of rock. We revisit their debut, their early EPs, and touch on their 2000s releases to trace the origins of the band that has gained a global audience while splitting fans over their embrace of poppier and dancier material. Songs In This Episode: Muscle Museum (from Showbiz) 6:40 - Cave (from Showbiz) 17:28 - Falling Down (from Showbiz) 23:47 - Uno (from Showbi...

81 MIN3 d ago
Comments
#489: Origins - Muse In The 90s

#488: Dig by Dig with Scott Hackwith

Thanks to old friend of the show Chip Midnight, when patron Dewey Cole suggested revisiting the 1993 self-titled debut album from Dig, Chip reached out to lead singer and guitarist Scott Hackwith to have him join us to revisit this record. Dewey only came to record recently, so he provides a unique perspective of discovering an album seventeen years after its release. Chip interviewed Scott when the band was just starting out, gigging around the country with frequent stops in Ohio in the early-to-mid 1990s. Scott, who started out as a guitarist in T.S.O.L., learned to be a producer on the spot making the debut album, which led him to work on records by the Ramones, Spiritualized and other, shares stories and insights on album artwork, demo'ing tracks on a four-track machine, making music videos, and working on new Dig music. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Believe 32:22 - Let Me Know 37:24 - Feet Don't Touch The Ground 1:00:33 - Conversation Outro - Unlucky Friend Support the podcast...

86 MIN1 w ago
Comments
#488: Dig by Dig with Scott Hackwith

#487: Spanaway by Seaweed

If you've listened to this podcast long enough, you know that we are not always in agreement about what works and doesn't work for us on various albums. One of the earliest disagreements was back in Season One when we checked out the 1993 album Four by Seaweed. Thanks to a recent listener suggested poll on our Patreon site, we're back ten years later to check out the 1995 follow-up Spanaway, the band's only release on the Hollywood Records label. While the band faced the tired "sell-out"label for signing to a major, in reality, the band stayed close to what they did well - a bombastic combo of East Coast post-hardcore and PacWest grunge, with some extra nuance thanks to the skilled fingers of Andy Wallace behind the mixing board, as well as guest visits in the drum throne by Barrett Martin (of Screaming Trees)and Matt Cameron (of Soundgarden). The question remains - has anything changed in our diverging opinions? Songs In This Episode Intro - Start With 18:45 - Magic Mountainman 22:...

50 MIN2 w ago
Comments
#487: Spanaway by Seaweed

#486: Michael McDermott and Brian Koppleman revisit Gethsemane

While we have chatted with many artists over the years, rarely have we been able to get the record label perspective on the various ups and downs of the 90s. For this episode, we're lucky to get singer/songwriter Michael McDermott, who has been making records for thirty years, and the A&Rrep who helped kick off that career, Brian Koppelman. While Brian is better known for his screenwriting (Rounders, Ocean's 13)and showrunning (Billions), his life in the music industry dates back to high school with A&Rstints at Elektra Records, Giant Records, SBK Records and EMI Records. We dig into the album Michael and Brian worked on together, 1993's Gethsemane, and the various trials and tribulations of releasing a singer/songwriter album in the heyday of Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and Alice In Chains, the producer and songwriter relationship in the studio, why being too sympathetic to the artist can be a negative, and much much more. Songs In This Episode: Intro/1:47 - Just West Of Eden 1...

48 MIN3 w ago
Comments
#486: Michael McDermott and Brian Koppleman revisit Gethsemane

#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

While the 90s were dominated by the touring festival as opposed to the current day destination festival, the first half and second half had decidedly different approaches. Lollapalooza took a variety of artists from across genres with the intention of exposing artists across differing fanbases, whereas the Warped Tour, Ozzfest, H.O.R.D.E.Tour, and Lilith Fair each narrowed their focus. In the case of Lilith Fair, the simplistic history is that it was a female-centric folk tour, headlined by the likes of Sarah McLachlan, the Indigo Girls, Suzanne Vega, and Sheryl Crow. In reality, over the course of three years, the festival provided a much broader spectrum of female artists, including Queen Latifah, Bonnie Raitt, Letters To Cleo, Liz Phair, Dance Hall Crashers, K's Choice, Luscious Jackson, Nenah Cherry, The Pretenders, Missy Elliott, The Cardigans, Susanna Hoffs, Juliana Hatfield, and many many more. To help us revisit we invited back a pair of performers (Kay Hanley of Letters to ...

65 MINAPR 28
Comments
#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

#484: Less Is More by Even

Forging a sound out of American grunge and alternative along with British Invasion hooks and power pop melodies may seem like a recipe for disaster, but on their 1996 debut Less Is More, the Melbourne, Australian trio Even find the right balance. Channeling a Kurt Cobain cadence on one track and a John Lennon howl on another works best when the band keeps the songs short and tight, with plenty of catchy guitar riffs toss around. While we dug the high energy performances that pre-date the garage rock revival to come at the end of the decade, some of the production and rhythm choices (or lack of)left us wanting. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Karmic Flop 14:35 - End To End 19:45 - Don't Wait 26:02 - Eternal Teen 31:29 - No One Understands Me Outro - Dean Morris Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive atDigMeOutPodcast.com.

48 MINAPR 21
Comments
#484: Less Is More by Even

#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

Once the alternative gold rush hit for bands in the 90s, one song could make or break an album. But for every Sex And Candy, Cumbersome or Possum Kingdom, hundreds of other bands failed to make the Top 40 for a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the music. Take Vancouver, Canada's Odds, whose third album Good Weird Feeling is a smart combination of alternative guitar rock powered by two strong singers with a knack for lyrical twists. The two obvious singles, "Eat My Brain"and "Truth Untold"never found a home on American mainstream radio, and like so many of their northern counterparts, the band remains almost entirely unknown in the lower forty-eight. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Satisfied 17:41 - Oh Sorrow Oh Shame 20:55 - Break The Bed 24:56 - Truth Untold 31:07 - I Would Be Your Man Outro - Eat My Brain Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon. Listen to the episode archive atDigMeOutPodcast.com.

51 MINAPR 14
Comments
#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

Though not as lauded as grunge, Brit-pop, the rise of pop-punk or other 90s-centric genres, electronic music evolved throughout the decade as well thanks to subtler sounds coming out of the UK. While electronica and trip-hop each had their moments in the mainstream spotlight, groups like the brother-duo Boards of Canada from Scotland slid under the radar with slightly different takes, theirs being a more chill, downtempo approach utilizing vintage synths and drum machines, tape loops and field recordings. Music Has The Right To Children, their 1998 debut after several well-regarded singles and EPs, takes full advantage of the tools, creating atmospheric soundscapes backed by drum and bass loops that lived-in rather than dialed-up, giving the record a timeless element that so many of their contemporaries failed to achieve. Songs In This Episode: Intro - Telephasic Workshop 18:06 - Roygbiv 20:48 - Turquoise Hexagon Sun 27:09 - Aquarius Outro - Open The Light Support the podcast, join ...

45 MINAPR 7
Comments
#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

#481: Ebbhead by Nitzer Ebb

Though the mid-to-late nights are more regarded for the commercial rise of electronic music, specifically in the form of UKelectronica from the Chemical Brothers, Prodigy and others, the mainstream interest in high octane beats and synth-over-guitar was nothing new. As the 80s transitioned to the 90s, bands like Depeche Mode and New Order were firmly established global phenomenons, while up-and-comers like Ministry and Nine Inch Nails were bringing industrial sounds to the mainstream on MTV. Nitzer Ebb began in 1982 and established themselves throughout the decade as an Electronic Body Music (EBM) pillar, but when 90s arrives the band pivoted to a more pop sound, and on 1991's Ebbhead, the band fully embraced pop structure and sound, crafting catchy hooks at trimmed down lengths. But that evolution, while moderately successful in getting the band on mainstream rock radio, didn't necessarily sit well with the fans who discovered the band during their EBM period. Songs In This Episode...

45 MINMAR 31
Comments
#481: Ebbhead by Nitzer Ebb

#480: Sophomore Slump Revisited - American Highway Flower by Dada

As we have learned in our Sophomore Slump Revisited roundtable series, there are many factors and circumstances that can sink a band's second album, especially when coming off a hit single. In the case of Dada and their 1994 release American Highway Flower, the lack of an obvious radio single to match DizzKnee Land off their debut is a fair consideration. Rather than repeat a formula, the skilled trio of singer-guitarist Michael Gurley, singer-bassist Joie Calio and drummer Phil Leavitt pushed the band in a variety of directions while maintaining a more consistent sound than their first release. But pushing the envelope doesn't always result in a match with the cultural trends, and while the band flexes their muscle with harmonious power-pop and '60s psychedelic flourishes while unafraid to get extra noisy or delicately hushed. They may not have scored a Top 5 single or moved a million units with American Highway Flower, but that doesn't mean this sophomore release qualifies as a sl...

62 MINMAR 24
Comments
#480: Sophomore Slump Revisited - American Highway Flower by Dada
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