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A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Andrew Hickey

20
Followers
77
Plays
A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Andrew Hickey

20
Followers
77
Plays
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Andrew Hickey presents a history of rock and roll in five hundred songs.

Latest Episodes

Episode 89: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles

Episode eighty-nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles, and at the beginnings of the Brill Building sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Tom Dooley" by the Kingston Trio. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of the Shirelles in print, so I've used a variety of sources, including the articles on the Shirelles and Luther Dixon at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King's autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era. And Here Comes The Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues by Joel Selvin goes into some detail about Scepter Records. I also referred to the liner notes of this CD, which contains most of the Shirelles tracks worth owning. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript We're currently in a patch of rock and roll history that is ludicrously undocumented. There is book after book about the major stars of the early rock and roll era -- while you won't find much out there on a lot of truly important artists, you can find out enough about Elvis and Ray Charles and Johnny Cash and Little Richard and Chuck Berry and the rest -- these are all romantic figures of legend, the Titans who were defeated in the Titanomachy that was the mid-sixties Beat boom. And of course, there are many many, books on almost every band of the mid to late sixties to even have a minor hit. But the period from 1958 through 1964 is generally summed up by "and there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon". Occasionally, in some of the books, there is a slightly more subtle approach taken, and the summary is "there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon, and also Roy Orbison and one or two others made a decent record". But there were many other people making great records -- people who made hits that are still staples of oldies radio in a way that a lot of records from a few years later aren't; records that still sound like they're fresh new records made by people who have ideas. Today we're going to talk about a few of those people, and about one of those great records. We're going to look at the Brill Building, and some of the songwriters who worked there, and at the great record producer Luther Dixon, and at the Shirelles, and their record "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?": [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?"] It's been a little while since we looked at any of the early girl groups, but if you remember the episodes on the Bobettes and the Chantels, girl groups in the early years were largely a phenomenon based in New York, and that's more or less the case with the Shirelles, who didn't come from New York itself, but from Passaic New Jersey, about sixteen miles away. Shirley Owens, Doris Coley, Addie Harris and Beverly Lee met at school, and formed a group called the Poquellos, which is apparently Spanish for "little birds". As we've discussed previously, most of the early doo-wop groups were named after birds, and these girls were forming their group before girl groups became regarded as something separate from male vocal groups. Oddly, the group that became the most successful of the early girl groups, and the

37 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Episode 89: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles

Episode 88: "Cathy's Clown" by the Everly Brothers

Episode eighty-eight ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Cathy's Clown" by The Everly Brothers, and at how after signing the biggest contract in music business history their career was sabotaged by their manager. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Poetry in Motion" by Johnny Tillotson. ----more---- Resources As always, I've created aMixcloud streaming playlistwith full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no first-rate biographies of the Everly Brothers in print, at least in English (apparently there's a decent one in French, but I don't speak French well enough for that).Ike's Boysby Phyllis Karpis the only full-length bio, and I relied on that in the absence of anything else, but it's been out of print for nearly thirty years, and is not worth the exorbitant price it goes for second-hand. The Everlypediais a serie...

39 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 88: "Cathy's Clown" by the Everly Brothers

Episode 87: "Apache" by the Shadows

Episode eighty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Apache", by the Shadows, and at the three years in which they and Cliff Richard were on top of the music world. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Handy Man" by Jimmy Jones. My apologies for the lateness of this episode, which is due to my home Internet connection having been out for a week. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. This four-CD setcontains all the singles and EPs released by Cliff Richard and the Shadows, together and separately, between 1958 and 1962. Meanwhile, this six-CD set contains every recording the Shadows made on their own between 1959 and 1966, for a very low price....

47 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 87: "Apache" by the Shadows

Apology for Delay

This is just an apology for this week's episode being late. There have been massive thunderstorms in my area, which have fried some bits of local Internet infrastructure. My only Internet access currently is through a mobile phone with a very limited data plan, so I can't upload any files until I get some more bandwidth, hopefully some time this weekend. I'll be getting the podcast up as soon as I can after that. Thanks for your patience.

27 s3 w ago
Comments
Apology for Delay

Episode 86: "LSD-25" by the Gamblers

Episode eighty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "LSD-25" by the Gamblers, the first rock song ever to namecheck acid, and a song by a band so obscure no photos exist of them. (The photo here is of the touring lineup of the Hollywood Argyles. Derry Weaver, the Gamblers' lead guitarist, is top left). Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Papa Oom Mow Mow" by the Rivingtons. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. This episode, more than most, required tiny bits of information from dozens of sources. Among those I used were the one existing interview with Derry Weaver I have been able to find, Dean Torrence's autobiography, a book about John Dolphi...

42 MINJUN 11
Comments
Episode 86: "LSD-25" by the Gamblers

Episode 85: "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran

Episode eighty-five ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran, and at the British tour which changed music and ended his life. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Quarter to Three" by Gary US Bonds. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put togethera Mixcloud mixwith every song excerpted in this podcast. Much of the information here comes from Spencer Leigh's bookThings Do Go Wrong, which looks specifically at the 1960 tour. I also usedGene Vincent and Eddie Cochran: Rock and Roll Revolutionariesby John Collis. While there are dozens of compilations of Cochran's music available, many of th...

42 MINJUN 5
Comments
Episode 85: "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran

The Show Must Be Paused

Today's podcast is eight minutes and forty-six seconds of silence.

8 MINJUN 2
Comments
The Show Must Be Paused

Episode 84: "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates

Episode eighty-four ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates, and how the first great British R&B band interacted with the entertainment industry. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Under Your Spell Again" by Buck Owens. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put togethera Mixcloud mixwith every song excerpted in this podcast. Only one biography of Kidd has been written, and that's been out of print for nearly a quarter of a century and goes for ridiculous prices. Luckily Adie Barrett's sitehttp://www.johnnykidd.co.uk/is everything a fan-site should be, and has a detailed biograp...

50 MINMAY 28
Comments
Episode 84: "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates

Episode 83: "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison

Episode eighty-three ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison, and how Orbison finally found success by ignoring conventional pop song structure. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have two bonus podcasts -- part one of a two-part Q&A and a ten-minute bonus on "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources Apologies for the delay this week -- I'm still trying to catch up after last week. As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. I have relied for biographical information mostly on two books --The Authorised Roy Orbisonwritten by Jeff Slate and three of Orbison's children, andRhapsod...

38 MINMAY 22
Comments
Episode 83: "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison

Episode 82: "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley

Episode eighty-two ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley, and the way his promising comeback after leaving the Army quickly got derailed. This episode also contains a brief acknowledgment of the death of the great Little Richard, who died just as I was recording this episode. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Muleskinner Blues" by the Fendermen. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources Apologies for the delay this week -- I've been unwell, as you might be able to tell from the croaky voice in places. Don't worry, it's not anything serious... No Mixcloud this week, as almost every song excerpte...

34 MINMAY 14
Comments
Episode 82: "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley

Latest Episodes

Episode 89: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles

Episode eighty-nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles, and at the beginnings of the Brill Building sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Tom Dooley" by the Kingston Trio. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no biographies of the Shirelles in print, so I've used a variety of sources, including the articles on the Shirelles and Luther Dixon at This Is My Story. The following books were also of some use: A Natural Woman is Carole King's autobiography. Always Magic in the Air: The Bomp and Brilliance of the Brill Building Era by Ken Emerson is a good overview of the whole scene. Girl Groups by John Clemente contains potted biographies of many groups of the era. And Here Comes The Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues by Joel Selvin goes into some detail about Scepter Records. I also referred to the liner notes of this CD, which contains most of the Shirelles tracks worth owning. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript We're currently in a patch of rock and roll history that is ludicrously undocumented. There is book after book about the major stars of the early rock and roll era -- while you won't find much out there on a lot of truly important artists, you can find out enough about Elvis and Ray Charles and Johnny Cash and Little Richard and Chuck Berry and the rest -- these are all romantic figures of legend, the Titans who were defeated in the Titanomachy that was the mid-sixties Beat boom. And of course, there are many many, books on almost every band of the mid to late sixties to even have a minor hit. But the period from 1958 through 1964 is generally summed up by "and there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon". Occasionally, in some of the books, there is a slightly more subtle approach taken, and the summary is "there were some whitebread nonentities like Fabian and Frankie Avalon, and also Roy Orbison and one or two others made a decent record". But there were many other people making great records -- people who made hits that are still staples of oldies radio in a way that a lot of records from a few years later aren't; records that still sound like they're fresh new records made by people who have ideas. Today we're going to talk about a few of those people, and about one of those great records. We're going to look at the Brill Building, and some of the songwriters who worked there, and at the great record producer Luther Dixon, and at the Shirelles, and their record "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?": [Excerpt: The Shirelles, "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?"] It's been a little while since we looked at any of the early girl groups, but if you remember the episodes on the Bobettes and the Chantels, girl groups in the early years were largely a phenomenon based in New York, and that's more or less the case with the Shirelles, who didn't come from New York itself, but from Passaic New Jersey, about sixteen miles away. Shirley Owens, Doris Coley, Addie Harris and Beverly Lee met at school, and formed a group called the Poquellos, which is apparently Spanish for "little birds". As we've discussed previously, most of the early doo-wop groups were named after birds, and these girls were forming their group before girl groups became regarded as something separate from male vocal groups. Oddly, the group that became the most successful of the early girl groups, and the

37 MIN2 d ago
Comments
Episode 89: "Will You Love Me Tomorrow?" by the Shirelles

Episode 88: "Cathy's Clown" by the Everly Brothers

Episode eighty-eight ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Cathy's Clown" by The Everly Brothers, and at how after signing the biggest contract in music business history their career was sabotaged by their manager. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Poetry in Motion" by Johnny Tillotson. ----more---- Resources As always, I've created aMixcloud streaming playlistwith full versions of all the songs in the episode. There are no first-rate biographies of the Everly Brothers in print, at least in English (apparently there's a decent one in French, but I don't speak French well enough for that).Ike's Boysby Phyllis Karpis the only full-length bio, and I relied on that in the absence of anything else, but it's been out of print for nearly thirty years, and is not worth the exorbitant price it goes for second-hand. The Everlypediais a serie...

39 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Episode 88: "Cathy's Clown" by the Everly Brothers

Episode 87: "Apache" by the Shadows

Episode eighty-seven of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Apache", by the Shadows, and at the three years in which they and Cliff Richard were on top of the music world. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Handy Man" by Jimmy Jones. My apologies for the lateness of this episode, which is due to my home Internet connection having been out for a week. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. This four-CD setcontains all the singles and EPs released by Cliff Richard and the Shadows, together and separately, between 1958 and 1962. Meanwhile, this six-CD set contains every recording the Shadows made on their own between 1959 and 1966, for a very low price....

47 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Episode 87: "Apache" by the Shadows

Apology for Delay

This is just an apology for this week's episode being late. There have been massive thunderstorms in my area, which have fried some bits of local Internet infrastructure. My only Internet access currently is through a mobile phone with a very limited data plan, so I can't upload any files until I get some more bandwidth, hopefully some time this weekend. I'll be getting the podcast up as soon as I can after that. Thanks for your patience.

27 s3 w ago
Comments
Apology for Delay

Episode 86: "LSD-25" by the Gamblers

Episode eighty-six of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "LSD-25" by the Gamblers, the first rock song ever to namecheck acid, and a song by a band so obscure no photos exist of them. (The photo here is of the touring lineup of the Hollywood Argyles. Derry Weaver, the Gamblers' lead guitarist, is top left). Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Papa Oom Mow Mow" by the Rivingtons. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. This episode, more than most, required tiny bits of information from dozens of sources. Among those I used were the one existing interview with Derry Weaver I have been able to find, Dean Torrence's autobiography, a book about John Dolphi...

42 MINJUN 11
Comments
Episode 86: "LSD-25" by the Gamblers

Episode 85: "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran

Episode eighty-five ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran, and at the British tour which changed music and ended his life. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Quarter to Three" by Gary US Bonds. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put togethera Mixcloud mixwith every song excerpted in this podcast. Much of the information here comes from Spencer Leigh's bookThings Do Go Wrong, which looks specifically at the 1960 tour. I also usedGene Vincent and Eddie Cochran: Rock and Roll Revolutionariesby John Collis. While there are dozens of compilations of Cochran's music available, many of th...

42 MINJUN 5
Comments
Episode 85: "Three Steps to Heaven" by Eddie Cochran

The Show Must Be Paused

Today's podcast is eight minutes and forty-six seconds of silence.

8 MINJUN 2
Comments
The Show Must Be Paused

Episode 84: "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates

Episode eighty-four ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates, and how the first great British R&B band interacted with the entertainment industry. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a fifteen-minute bonus episode, on "Under Your Spell Again" by Buck Owens. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have put togethera Mixcloud mixwith every song excerpted in this podcast. Only one biography of Kidd has been written, and that's been out of print for nearly a quarter of a century and goes for ridiculous prices. Luckily Adie Barrett's sitehttp://www.johnnykidd.co.uk/is everything a fan-site should be, and has a detailed biograp...

50 MINMAY 28
Comments
Episode 84: "Shakin' All Over" by Johnny Kidd and the Pirates

Episode 83: "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison

Episode eighty-three ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison, and how Orbison finally found success by ignoring conventional pop song structure. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have two bonus podcasts -- part one of a two-part Q&A and a ten-minute bonus on "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources Apologies for the delay this week -- I'm still trying to catch up after last week. As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. I have relied for biographical information mostly on two books --The Authorised Roy Orbisonwritten by Jeff Slate and three of Orbison's children, andRhapsod...

38 MINMAY 22
Comments
Episode 83: "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison

Episode 82: "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley

Episode eighty-two ofA History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songslooks at "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley, and the way his promising comeback after leaving the Army quickly got derailed. This episode also contains a brief acknowledgment of the death of the great Little Richard, who died just as I was recording this episode. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Muleskinner Blues" by the Fendermen. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts athttp://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proustandhttp://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources Apologies for the delay this week -- I've been unwell, as you might be able to tell from the croaky voice in places. Don't worry, it's not anything serious... No Mixcloud this week, as almost every song excerpte...

34 MINMAY 14
Comments
Episode 82: "Are You Lonesome Tonight?" by Elvis Presley
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