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Music History Monday

Robert Greenberg

7
Followers
49
Plays
Music History Monday

Music History Monday

Robert Greenberg

7
Followers
49
Plays
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About Us

Speaker, Composer, Author, Professor, Historian

Latest Episodes

The Planets

We mark the premiere performance - on September 28, 1918 – 102 years ago today – of Gustav Holst’s The Planets in Queen’s Hall, London, under the baton of Adrian Boult. To hear Holst (1874-1934) tell it, The Planets became an albatross around his neck; a monkey on his back; a large, gnarly grain of sand in his skivvies: it made him internationally famous and remained so popular that nothing he composed for the remainder of his life ever came close to approaching its popularity. Holst went to his grave believing that as far as the public was concerned, he was hardly more than a one-hit wonder.

17 min13 h ago
Comments
The Planets

The Prodigal Son Returns

On September 21, 1962 – 58 years ago today – the composer Igor Stravinsky returned to Russia for the first time in 48 years: he had been gone since 1914. Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was born on June 17, 1882 in the tony summer resort town of Oranienbaum (today known as Lomonosov) on the Gulf of Finland, about 25 miles from St. Petersburg. His father Fyodor Ignatievich Stravinsky (1843-1902) was a well-known opera singer – a bass (oh, how the Russians love their bass singers!) – with the Kyiv Opera and Mariinsky Theater there in Peter.

19 min1 w ago
Comments
The Prodigal Son Returns

Music History Monday: The “Other” Haydn

We mark the birth on September 14, 1737 – 283 years ago today – of the composer, organist, and violinist Johann Michael Haydn, in the western Austrian town of Rohrau. (Rohrau lies about 20 miles west of today’s capital of Slovakia – Bratislava - a city called Pressburg in Haydn’s day.)

15 min2 w ago
Comments
Music History Monday: The “Other” Haydn

François-André Danican Philidor

François-André – better known simply as André – came from a long line of musicians on his father’s side. His paternal grandfather Jean Danican Philidor (ca. 1620-1679) was a musician in theGrande Écurie(meaning, literally, the “Great Stable”), Paris’ famed military band. His great uncle Michel Danican (who died circa 1659) was a famous oboist who is credited – with Jean Hotteterre – with co-inventing the modern oboe. His father André Danican Philidor (circa 1647–1730 and later referred to asPhilidor l'ainé- Philidor the Elder - to distinguish him from his more famous son) was an oboist in Grande Écurie military band and performed as well at the Royal Chapel, in the employ of none-other-than Louis XIV (1638-1715), the great “Sun King” himself.

18 min3 w ago
Comments
François-André Danican Philidor

Music History Monday: I Want, I Need, I Must Have: Rock Stars and Their Riders

According to “This Day in Music.com”, on August 31, 2006 – 14 years ago today – the Times of London ran an article on the sometimes outright whacko-crazy demands made by rock stars when on tour. Today we’ll live vicariously through a few of these rockers and see what sort of extravagance we too could command if we were among their number.

18 minSEP 1
Comments
Music History Monday: I Want, I Need, I Must Have: Rock Stars and Their Riders

Bohemian Rhapsody

It was on August 24, 1975 – 45 years ago today – that Queen began recording Bohemian Rhapsody at Rockfield Studio No. 1 in Monmouth, Wales. It would take a total of three weeks to record the song. We are told that Freddie Mercury had “mentally prepared the song beforehand” and thus he directed the sessions. We are also told that Mercury, along with fellow bandmembers Brian May and Roger Taylor, sang their vocal parts pretty much non-stop for “ten to twelve hours a day”, resulting, in the end, in 180-plus separate overdubs (to say nothing for sore throats and hoarse voices!).

17 minAUG 24
Comments
Bohemian Rhapsody

The Miracle at Bayreuth!

On August 17, 1876 – 144 years ago today – Richard Wagner’s music drama Götterdämmerung (“Twilight of the Gods”) received its premiere in his newly-opened “Festival Theater” in Bayreuth, Germany. That performance of Götterdämmerung brought to its conclusion the first production of Wagner’s epic four evening tetralogy, The Ring of the Niebelung.

18 minAUG 18
Comments
The Miracle at Bayreuth!

Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony and the Summer of 1788

We mark the completion, on August 10, 1788 – 232 years ago today – of Mozart’s Symphony in C major, catalogued by Ludwig Köchel as K. 551 and nicknamed the “Jupiter”. It was Mozart’s final symphony, a towering, innovative masterwork, the greatest symphony ever composed to its time and by any standard of measure one of a handful of greatest symphonies ever composed. That it took Mozart all of 16 days to commit it to paper defies our imaginations. That it was composed back-to-back with the luminous, transcendentally lyric Symphony in E-flat major and the tragic, gut-busting Symphony in G Minor in something under a total of eight weeks beggars our belief. Finally, that Mozart managed this mind-blowing compositional feat while under a black cloud of grief, physical ill-health, and mounting financial disaster is just, well, inconceivable.

11 minAUG 11
Comments
Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony and the Summer of 1788

The Grandmother of them all: the Teatro alla Scala

We mark the opening on August 3, 1778 – 242 years today – of the grandmother of all opera houses, the Teatro alla Scala, or simply “La Scala.” The inaugural performance was the premiere of Antonio Salieri's opera Europa Riconosciuta, or “Europe Rewarded”.

17 minAUG 3
Comments
The Grandmother of them all: the Teatro alla Scala

Ferruccio Busoni

Ferruccio Busoni was a phenomenon, a figure almost unique in Western music, a man and musician impossible to pigeon-hole. He was a virtuoso in pretty much every field of music he chose to explore. He was a pianist of other-worldly ability; a visionary composer possessing the very highest technical skills; a conductor of supreme intelligence; a brilliant musical thinker: a profoundly knowledgeable musician who, as a composer, managed to merge the past with the modernist impulse of the turn-of-the-twentieth century.

16 minJUL 28
Comments
Ferruccio Busoni

Latest Episodes

The Planets

We mark the premiere performance - on September 28, 1918 – 102 years ago today – of Gustav Holst’s The Planets in Queen’s Hall, London, under the baton of Adrian Boult. To hear Holst (1874-1934) tell it, The Planets became an albatross around his neck; a monkey on his back; a large, gnarly grain of sand in his skivvies: it made him internationally famous and remained so popular that nothing he composed for the remainder of his life ever came close to approaching its popularity. Holst went to his grave believing that as far as the public was concerned, he was hardly more than a one-hit wonder.

17 min13 h ago
Comments
The Planets

The Prodigal Son Returns

On September 21, 1962 – 58 years ago today – the composer Igor Stravinsky returned to Russia for the first time in 48 years: he had been gone since 1914. Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky was born on June 17, 1882 in the tony summer resort town of Oranienbaum (today known as Lomonosov) on the Gulf of Finland, about 25 miles from St. Petersburg. His father Fyodor Ignatievich Stravinsky (1843-1902) was a well-known opera singer – a bass (oh, how the Russians love their bass singers!) – with the Kyiv Opera and Mariinsky Theater there in Peter.

19 min1 w ago
Comments
The Prodigal Son Returns

Music History Monday: The “Other” Haydn

We mark the birth on September 14, 1737 – 283 years ago today – of the composer, organist, and violinist Johann Michael Haydn, in the western Austrian town of Rohrau. (Rohrau lies about 20 miles west of today’s capital of Slovakia – Bratislava - a city called Pressburg in Haydn’s day.)

15 min2 w ago
Comments
Music History Monday: The “Other” Haydn

François-André Danican Philidor

François-André – better known simply as André – came from a long line of musicians on his father’s side. His paternal grandfather Jean Danican Philidor (ca. 1620-1679) was a musician in theGrande Écurie(meaning, literally, the “Great Stable”), Paris’ famed military band. His great uncle Michel Danican (who died circa 1659) was a famous oboist who is credited – with Jean Hotteterre – with co-inventing the modern oboe. His father André Danican Philidor (circa 1647–1730 and later referred to asPhilidor l'ainé- Philidor the Elder - to distinguish him from his more famous son) was an oboist in Grande Écurie military band and performed as well at the Royal Chapel, in the employ of none-other-than Louis XIV (1638-1715), the great “Sun King” himself.

18 min3 w ago
Comments
François-André Danican Philidor

Music History Monday: I Want, I Need, I Must Have: Rock Stars and Their Riders

According to “This Day in Music.com”, on August 31, 2006 – 14 years ago today – the Times of London ran an article on the sometimes outright whacko-crazy demands made by rock stars when on tour. Today we’ll live vicariously through a few of these rockers and see what sort of extravagance we too could command if we were among their number.

18 minSEP 1
Comments
Music History Monday: I Want, I Need, I Must Have: Rock Stars and Their Riders

Bohemian Rhapsody

It was on August 24, 1975 – 45 years ago today – that Queen began recording Bohemian Rhapsody at Rockfield Studio No. 1 in Monmouth, Wales. It would take a total of three weeks to record the song. We are told that Freddie Mercury had “mentally prepared the song beforehand” and thus he directed the sessions. We are also told that Mercury, along with fellow bandmembers Brian May and Roger Taylor, sang their vocal parts pretty much non-stop for “ten to twelve hours a day”, resulting, in the end, in 180-plus separate overdubs (to say nothing for sore throats and hoarse voices!).

17 minAUG 24
Comments
Bohemian Rhapsody

The Miracle at Bayreuth!

On August 17, 1876 – 144 years ago today – Richard Wagner’s music drama Götterdämmerung (“Twilight of the Gods”) received its premiere in his newly-opened “Festival Theater” in Bayreuth, Germany. That performance of Götterdämmerung brought to its conclusion the first production of Wagner’s epic four evening tetralogy, The Ring of the Niebelung.

18 minAUG 18
Comments
The Miracle at Bayreuth!

Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony and the Summer of 1788

We mark the completion, on August 10, 1788 – 232 years ago today – of Mozart’s Symphony in C major, catalogued by Ludwig Köchel as K. 551 and nicknamed the “Jupiter”. It was Mozart’s final symphony, a towering, innovative masterwork, the greatest symphony ever composed to its time and by any standard of measure one of a handful of greatest symphonies ever composed. That it took Mozart all of 16 days to commit it to paper defies our imaginations. That it was composed back-to-back with the luminous, transcendentally lyric Symphony in E-flat major and the tragic, gut-busting Symphony in G Minor in something under a total of eight weeks beggars our belief. Finally, that Mozart managed this mind-blowing compositional feat while under a black cloud of grief, physical ill-health, and mounting financial disaster is just, well, inconceivable.

11 minAUG 11
Comments
Mozart’s “Jupiter” Symphony and the Summer of 1788

The Grandmother of them all: the Teatro alla Scala

We mark the opening on August 3, 1778 – 242 years today – of the grandmother of all opera houses, the Teatro alla Scala, or simply “La Scala.” The inaugural performance was the premiere of Antonio Salieri's opera Europa Riconosciuta, or “Europe Rewarded”.

17 minAUG 3
Comments
The Grandmother of them all: the Teatro alla Scala

Ferruccio Busoni

Ferruccio Busoni was a phenomenon, a figure almost unique in Western music, a man and musician impossible to pigeon-hole. He was a virtuoso in pretty much every field of music he chose to explore. He was a pianist of other-worldly ability; a visionary composer possessing the very highest technical skills; a conductor of supreme intelligence; a brilliant musical thinker: a profoundly knowledgeable musician who, as a composer, managed to merge the past with the modernist impulse of the turn-of-the-twentieth century.

16 minJUL 28
Comments
Ferruccio Busoni
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