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The Band: A History

The Band: A History

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72
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The Band: A History

The Band: A History

The Band: A History

11
Followers
72
Plays
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Exploring the history of Canadian-American roots rock group, The Band. Proud part of Pantheon - the podcast network for music lovers.

Latest Episodes

Moondog Matinee: Part Two

When The Band entered the studio to continue to record Moondog Matinee,they switched locations. This time they flew out to Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, California to finish the last few songs. Los Angeles had been pulling The Band westward for sometime. With the rest of an album to finish, The Band couldn't turn down a request from George Harrison and Ringo Starr to help them record in the studio as well. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram Twitter Facebook The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/)

33 MINMAY 31
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Moondog Matinee: Part Two

Moondog Matinee: Part One

"That was all we could do at the time. We couldn't get along—we all knew that fairness was a bunch of shit. We all knew we were getting screwed, so we couldn't sit down and create no more music. 'Up on Cripple Creek' and all that stuff was over—all that collaboration was over, and that”said Levon reflecting on the period just prior to the recording of "Moondog Matinee". In 1971, "Rock of Ages" had led to an unofficial hiatus for The Band. Independently, The Band worked on various projects separately whether it was producing, writing or performing. There were also attempts at getting The Band back together to work on their next studio album. Though, none of those attempts led to anything fruitful. Richard hadn’t written a song, or at least presented a song to the group in some time and Robbie wasn’t offering up much either since he was hitting some serious writer’s block. Eventually, The Band came out of touring retirement in 1973. Which led to a legendary performance at Watkins Glen with The Grateful Dead and The Allman Brothers. Feeding off the energy of their live performances and feeling like more of a collective again, and hoping at reviving the creative juices needed to keep on producing albums for Capitol Records it was decided that an album of covers which eventually led to "Moondog Matinee". Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. Check out my recent appearance on Love That Album here.

39 MINMAY 1
Comments
Moondog Matinee: Part One

Interview: Elliott Landy

The Band: A History sits down with famed photographer Elliott Landy to discuss his length career in photography and the time he spent with The Band in their formative years. Landy has since gone on to publish a number of book including his second book about The Band entitled "Contacting The Band" which is currently being crowdfunded. You can find information about "Contacting The Band" and support the campaign here. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.

74 MINMAR 23
Comments
Interview: Elliott Landy

Rock of Ages

“Everybody had been so easily satisfied before and then it got harder to do what we did at ease… The feeling that the group had become what we’d rebelled against… that’s what a lot of the music after The Band was about.'' Robbie Robertson reflected in 1982 on the Rock of Ages period in The Band's history. It had felt like a while since The Band actually felt like a well oiled unit. Truth be told, The Band’s success was like a mousetrap, it had finally sprung and they were now stuck in more ways than one. Each member of the group were going through their own personal struggles in one way or another. Each member had their own lives with their wives, children and friends. It seems like they didn’t know how to communicate or to stop the ever moving freight train to take a second to slow down and come up with a plan on how to move forward in their new environment. After “Cahoots” there a momentary sigh of relief.It was a desperate attempt at keeping it all together. Collectively...

36 MINFEB 24
Comments
Rock of Ages

Cahoots

In 1993 Rick Danko told The News-Star: "I think we shipped a million copies of that second album and that changed a lot of people’s lives — in particular, the Band’s. After that, we were only getting together once a year, for a couple of months, to record. It was like we were too decadent to play.” 1970 was a hard year, but it wouldn't get any easier in 1971. Having struggled through "Stage Fright" and taking on the disastrous Festival Express music festival, The Band was burnt out and in a dark space. However, it was back into the studio to record a new album, even if they didn't want to. From the exterior The Band was the perfect group. They were pretty universally loved from their fans, their critics and their peers. The opposite was true for the five guys in the group, once a group of tight knit brothers was shattering. Creative droughts, drugs and alcohol continued to plague them deeply. "Cahoots" is a manifestation of the period the songs crafted for the album don't do any...

64 MINJAN 20
Comments
Cahoots

Interview: Daniel Roher

The Band: A History sits down with "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" filmmakerDaniel Roher to discuss the making of his documentary on Robbie Robertson. We discuss Roher's career in the Canadian documentary world, elevating his craft, the luck of landing "Once Were Brothers" and all that went into making the film, from star-studded interviews, Robbie and Levon's feud, Garth's exclusion and much, much more. You can find information about "Once Were Brothers" and were it is screening here. You can also find Daniel Roher on Instagram here. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.

61 MIN2019 NOV 25
Comments
Interview: Daniel Roher

Stage Fright

Rick Danko stated once: “Those first royalty checks we got almost killed some of us”. By 1970, The Band was starting to reap the rewards of their first two albums. Remember it has only been two years since the release of “Music From Big Pink”. It may feel like an elongated period of time, but The Band was a workhorse powering through producing an album yearly, while also staying busy on other projects. They were now receiving millions of dollars for the songs they wrote and performed. Frustrating from multiple avenues were starting to creep into what The Band had established. Drugs, alcohol, money, etc. were all working towards destroying what The Band had built. With little time and a label to keep happy, as well as an attempt to push all the issues aside, The Band went back into the studio to record their third album "Stage Fright". However, it wouldn't be as easy this time. "Stage Fright" tested the group and pushed The Band to their limits. Please Consider Following Us: Inst...

61 MIN2019 NOV 3
Comments
Stage Fright

Divide & Conquer

EThe Band's follow-up self-titled album "The Band" was a success and bigger than their first effort. You'd think they'd slow down and smell the roses, but they didn't. The Band never followed the same path as everyone else and continued to dive deep into recording. Often times as individuals rather than a group, each member spent serious time in 1969 and 1970 working on their friends projects including work for John Martyn, Todd Rundgren, Jesse Winchester and John Simon. However, with the success came the demands of a fanbase and a label. The Band spent time on the road in 1969 for the first time in an extended capacity. The success opened the door to a new life style, a place where everyone wanted to be your friend and every had a party. With touring also came press in a meaningful way. The Band broke ground being the first American band on TIME magazine. The Band also were re-introduced to the press with a very spicy interview given by Ronnie Hawkins and much, much more. The Band e...

47 MIN2019 SEP 8
Comments
Divide & Conquer

Review: Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

We review the new Robbie Robertson documentary "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" that just premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival directed by Daniel Roher and executive produced by Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard and Brian Glazer. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/)

15 MIN2019 SEP 7
Comments
Review: Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

The Brown Album

While The Band had critical success on their first studio effort 1968's "Music From Big Pink" they didn't waste anytime before getting back into the studio to make their follow up. The Band was now respected in their own right apart from Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan. They had the support of a growing fanbase, critics and most importantly musicians like George Harrison and Eric Clapton. However, while The Band were enjoying the frills of a now more luxurious lifestyle that didn't impede on their music making. Their self-titled second album, later referred to as "The Brown Album" pushed them even further in the music cultural zeitgeist. The approach similar to what they had done with their first album. This time holing themselves up into a homemade studio in the Hollywood Hills as opposed to the mountain wilderness of the Catskills in upstate New York. The Brown album went on to produce some of The Band's most well known songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", "Rag Mamma Rag...

68 MIN2019 AUG 4
Comments
The Brown Album

Latest Episodes

Moondog Matinee: Part Two

When The Band entered the studio to continue to record Moondog Matinee,they switched locations. This time they flew out to Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, California to finish the last few songs. Los Angeles had been pulling The Band westward for sometime. With the rest of an album to finish, The Band couldn't turn down a request from George Harrison and Ringo Starr to help them record in the studio as well. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram Twitter Facebook The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/)

33 MINMAY 31
Comments
Moondog Matinee: Part Two

Moondog Matinee: Part One

"That was all we could do at the time. We couldn't get along—we all knew that fairness was a bunch of shit. We all knew we were getting screwed, so we couldn't sit down and create no more music. 'Up on Cripple Creek' and all that stuff was over—all that collaboration was over, and that”said Levon reflecting on the period just prior to the recording of "Moondog Matinee". In 1971, "Rock of Ages" had led to an unofficial hiatus for The Band. Independently, The Band worked on various projects separately whether it was producing, writing or performing. There were also attempts at getting The Band back together to work on their next studio album. Though, none of those attempts led to anything fruitful. Richard hadn’t written a song, or at least presented a song to the group in some time and Robbie wasn’t offering up much either since he was hitting some serious writer’s block. Eventually, The Band came out of touring retirement in 1973. Which led to a legendary performance at Watkins Glen with The Grateful Dead and The Allman Brothers. Feeding off the energy of their live performances and feeling like more of a collective again, and hoping at reviving the creative juices needed to keep on producing albums for Capitol Records it was decided that an album of covers which eventually led to "Moondog Matinee". Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. Check out my recent appearance on Love That Album here.

39 MINMAY 1
Comments
Moondog Matinee: Part One

Interview: Elliott Landy

The Band: A History sits down with famed photographer Elliott Landy to discuss his length career in photography and the time he spent with The Band in their formative years. Landy has since gone on to publish a number of book including his second book about The Band entitled "Contacting The Band" which is currently being crowdfunded. You can find information about "Contacting The Band" and support the campaign here. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.

74 MINMAR 23
Comments
Interview: Elliott Landy

Rock of Ages

“Everybody had been so easily satisfied before and then it got harder to do what we did at ease… The feeling that the group had become what we’d rebelled against… that’s what a lot of the music after The Band was about.'' Robbie Robertson reflected in 1982 on the Rock of Ages period in The Band's history. It had felt like a while since The Band actually felt like a well oiled unit. Truth be told, The Band’s success was like a mousetrap, it had finally sprung and they were now stuck in more ways than one. Each member of the group were going through their own personal struggles in one way or another. Each member had their own lives with their wives, children and friends. It seems like they didn’t know how to communicate or to stop the ever moving freight train to take a second to slow down and come up with a plan on how to move forward in their new environment. After “Cahoots” there a momentary sigh of relief.It was a desperate attempt at keeping it all together. Collectively...

36 MINFEB 24
Comments
Rock of Ages

Cahoots

In 1993 Rick Danko told The News-Star: "I think we shipped a million copies of that second album and that changed a lot of people’s lives — in particular, the Band’s. After that, we were only getting together once a year, for a couple of months, to record. It was like we were too decadent to play.” 1970 was a hard year, but it wouldn't get any easier in 1971. Having struggled through "Stage Fright" and taking on the disastrous Festival Express music festival, The Band was burnt out and in a dark space. However, it was back into the studio to record a new album, even if they didn't want to. From the exterior The Band was the perfect group. They were pretty universally loved from their fans, their critics and their peers. The opposite was true for the five guys in the group, once a group of tight knit brothers was shattering. Creative droughts, drugs and alcohol continued to plague them deeply. "Cahoots" is a manifestation of the period the songs crafted for the album don't do any...

64 MINJAN 20
Comments
Cahoots

Interview: Daniel Roher

The Band: A History sits down with "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" filmmakerDaniel Roher to discuss the making of his documentary on Robbie Robertson. We discuss Roher's career in the Canadian documentary world, elevating his craft, the luck of landing "Once Were Brothers" and all that went into making the film, from star-studded interviews, Robbie and Levon's feud, Garth's exclusion and much, much more. You can find information about "Once Were Brothers" and were it is screening here. You can also find Daniel Roher on Instagram here. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.

61 MIN2019 NOV 25
Comments
Interview: Daniel Roher

Stage Fright

Rick Danko stated once: “Those first royalty checks we got almost killed some of us”. By 1970, The Band was starting to reap the rewards of their first two albums. Remember it has only been two years since the release of “Music From Big Pink”. It may feel like an elongated period of time, but The Band was a workhorse powering through producing an album yearly, while also staying busy on other projects. They were now receiving millions of dollars for the songs they wrote and performed. Frustrating from multiple avenues were starting to creep into what The Band had established. Drugs, alcohol, money, etc. were all working towards destroying what The Band had built. With little time and a label to keep happy, as well as an attempt to push all the issues aside, The Band went back into the studio to record their third album "Stage Fright". However, it wouldn't be as easy this time. "Stage Fright" tested the group and pushed The Band to their limits. Please Consider Following Us: Inst...

61 MIN2019 NOV 3
Comments
Stage Fright

Divide & Conquer

EThe Band's follow-up self-titled album "The Band" was a success and bigger than their first effort. You'd think they'd slow down and smell the roses, but they didn't. The Band never followed the same path as everyone else and continued to dive deep into recording. Often times as individuals rather than a group, each member spent serious time in 1969 and 1970 working on their friends projects including work for John Martyn, Todd Rundgren, Jesse Winchester and John Simon. However, with the success came the demands of a fanbase and a label. The Band spent time on the road in 1969 for the first time in an extended capacity. The success opened the door to a new life style, a place where everyone wanted to be your friend and every had a party. With touring also came press in a meaningful way. The Band broke ground being the first American band on TIME magazine. The Band also were re-introduced to the press with a very spicy interview given by Ronnie Hawkins and much, much more. The Band e...

47 MIN2019 SEP 8
Comments
Divide & Conquer

Review: Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

We review the new Robbie Robertson documentary "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" that just premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival directed by Daniel Roher and executive produced by Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard and Brian Glazer. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/)

15 MIN2019 SEP 7
Comments
Review: Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

The Brown Album

While The Band had critical success on their first studio effort 1968's "Music From Big Pink" they didn't waste anytime before getting back into the studio to make their follow up. The Band was now respected in their own right apart from Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan. They had the support of a growing fanbase, critics and most importantly musicians like George Harrison and Eric Clapton. However, while The Band were enjoying the frills of a now more luxurious lifestyle that didn't impede on their music making. Their self-titled second album, later referred to as "The Brown Album" pushed them even further in the music cultural zeitgeist. The approach similar to what they had done with their first album. This time holing themselves up into a homemade studio in the Hollywood Hills as opposed to the mountain wilderness of the Catskills in upstate New York. The Brown album went on to produce some of The Band's most well known songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", "Rag Mamma Rag...

68 MIN2019 AUG 4
Comments
The Brown Album
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