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Inside The Newsroom

Inside The Newsroom

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Inside The Newsroom

Inside The Newsroom

Inside The Newsroom

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Daniel Levitt delves inside the minds of journalists around the world

insidethenewsroom.substack.com

Latest Episodes

#67 — Sarah Nöckel (Femstreet)

Hello! And welcome to another episode of Inside The Newsroom. We’re in crazy times, so I thought it’d be good to take a break with today’s podcast guest… Sarah Nöckel, founder of Femstreet, a newsletter dedicated to women in tech and venture capital. Femstreet has exploded in popularity and influence since Sarah started it about two years ago, and we dug deep into how she grew her following to more than 7,000 subscribers from nothing, and what influence she’s had in narrowing the inequality gap. On Friday we’ll have an update on the you know what, specifically looking at what each U.S. state has done and is doing to combat the spread. Until then, enjoy some normality and stay safe out there. Enjoy Picks of the WeekTulsi Gabbard Drops Out — Yes, Tulsi was still in the race until last week, and bizarrely endorsed Joe Biden despite disagreeing with him on almost everythingMarie Newman — Progressive Marie Newman beat incumbent Democrat Dan Lipinski in Illinois’ 3rd district primary, and is set to join The Squad in the House of RepsOlympics Postponed — Japan and the IOC held out as long as possible, but they finally announced the inevitable and moved the Tokyo Olympics to next summerSarah How Sarah Built FemstreetSarah launched Femstreet because she couldn’t find a central place for news on women making strides in the technology and venture capital industries. So in September 2017, Sarah published her first article to just a handful of subscribers. More than 100 editions of Femstreet later, Sarah now publishes to more than 7,000 subscribers. While the content is targeted at women in tech and VC, her lessons and experience can be used and applied by anyone anywhere. Four of the biggest lessons Sarah has learned, which I share and couldn’t put better myself, include…Niche doesn’t mean small. Like-minded people find each otherFocus. Depth not breadthGenuine personal brand is importantCreate for the best readers, not all the readersWhat you can do now: start something. It doesn’t matter what, but with more downtime in these crazy times, just start with the first block, and then add to it every day.The Gap Is Closing, But Not Fast EnoughEvery year the World Economic Forum publishes its Global Gender Gap Report, which covers aspects including Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, and Political Empowerment. I dived into the 2020 edition to see what the current situation is and how large the strides we’re making are. Below is a summary of the main findings…Overall global gender parity is at 68.6 percent, up slightly from a year before. That figure is pulled up and down by different countries and subindexes, but overall, gender equality is improving.The subindex with the largest disparity is Political Empowerment — the number of women represented in parliaments around the world, followed by Economic Participation and Opportunity — the ability of women to enter the workplace. Educational Attainment and Health and Survival have 96.1 percent and 95.7 percent parity, respectively. The latter two are very positive.The number of women in parliament has improved dramatically in recent years, especially in countries such as Latvia, Spain and Thailand. But still only a quarter of the more than 35,000 global parliamentary seats are occupied by women. In some countries, women aren’t represented at all.The number of women in senior roles around the world has also increased. Globally, around 36 percent of senior private sector managers and public sector officials are women, a rise of about 2 percent from last year. This metric is also heavily weighted by a handful of countries.New problems exist lower down the ladder though. On average, only 55 percent of adult women are in the workforce, compared with 78 percent of men. Educational Attainment is another subindex weighted by developed countries in the west. Ten percent of women around the world are still illiterate. Significantly more investment i

45 MIN1 w ago
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#67 — Sarah Nöckel (Femstreet)

Coronavirus: What every country is doing (J-Z)

Hello. Welcome to Inside The Newsroom. We’re in unprecedented times. The coronavirus pandemic has swept through most of the planet, with total cases at more than 167,000 and deaths at 6,449, as of Monday morning. It’s quickly becoming one of the worst pandemics in history. But even with weeks of warning signs, governments around the world continue to be too lax and do too little. Here in the UK, the government have opted for a “herd immunity” strategy, happy for up to 80 percent of the 66 million population to contract the disease to build immunity while thousands of vulnerable people die in the process. Elsewhere in Europe, Spain has joined Italy in a full lockdown. But what about the rest of the world? For the record, the official numbers of cases and deaths are likely to be far higher due to the lack of tests available and carried out. With that said, let’s take a look at what each country with a confirmed case is doing to stop COVID-19. Due to Substack’s email length limits, I’ve had to divide into two emails. Look out for another email with countries between A and I. And share this post by hitting the below button Jamaica: 10 cases, 0 deaths Prime minister Andrew Holness declared the island a disaster area, meaning the government can do whatever it takes to stem the spread, and has deployed soldiers and police in the streets to restrict movement.Japan: 839 cases, 22 deaths One of the first countries outside of China to have a confirmed case, it’s amazing Japan has even been able to keep its cases to four figures. Still, prime minister Abe says the Olympics will go ahead in July still. I don’t believe him. Jordan: 8 cases, 0 deaths Country will ban all incoming and outgoing flights from tomorrow, and has already banned public gatherings and events. Schools and universities are closed for two weeks, as well as tourist sites and sports facilities.Kazakhstan: 9 cases, 0 deaths State of emergency has been declared which means a nationwide quarantine will restrict entry to and from the country.Kenya: 3 cases, 0 deaths Travelers from any country with a confirmed case have been banned, and schools have been suspended.Kuwait: 112 cases, 0 deaths Commercial facilities, shopping malls and public markets have been closed. No more than five people are allowed in grocery stories at the same time, and everyone is required to keep at least one meter away from each other.Latvia: 30 cases, 0 deaths All travel has been banned as of midnight last night, as well as public gatherings of more than 50 people. Latvians and people with residents will still be allowed back in.Lebanon: 110 cases, 3 deaths Medical state of emergency declared as the country’s financial crisis threatens to risk essential medical supplies. Restaurants and many public venues are already closed, and flights from many corona-infected countries have been halted.Liechtenstein: 4 cases, 0 deaths Little reported out of Liechtenstein.Lithuania: 12 cases, 0 deaths Whole country under quarantine for two weeks. Borders closed to travelers and non-essential stores have been closed.Luxembourg: 59 cases, 1 death Country is in lockdown as number of cases are slowly starting to rise. Malaysia: 428 cases, 0 deaths An 80 percent spike in the number of cases, with most being linked to a religious gathering attended by 16,000 people. Smart stuff. The region is a hotbed for mass outbreaks as attendees return home to neighbouring countries. Cheers Malaysia. Maldives: 13 cases, 0 deaths While most countries are shutting down, the Maldives have been busy building a luxury quarantine resort. The hotel was built in just 10 days by around 50 workers. That sounds sturdy. Don’t go to the Maldives.Malta: 21 cases, 0 deaths Country is on lockdown.Martinique: 9 cases, 0 deaths Little reported on government measures, as the Costa Favolosa cruise ship has been anchored ashore over the weekend. Mauritania: 1 case, 0 deaths First case reported on Saturday. Few reports on government action so far

36 MIN2 w ago
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Coronavirus: What every country is doing (J-Z)

Coronavirus: What every country is doing (A-I)

Hello. Welcome to Inside The Newsroom. We’re in unprecedented times. The coronavirus pandemic has swept through most of the planet, with total cases at more than 167,000 and deaths at 6,449, as of Monday morning. It’s quickly becoming one of the worst pandemics in history. But even with weeks of warning signs, governments around the world continue to be too lax and do too little. Here in the UK, the government have opted for a “herd immunity” strategy, happy for up to 80 percent of the 66 million population to contract the disease to build immunity while thousands of vulnerable people die in the process. Elsewhere in Europe, Spain has joined Italy in a full lockdown. But what about the rest of the world? For the record, the official numbers of cases and deaths are likely to be far higher due to the lack of tests available and carried out. With that said, let’s take a look at what each country with a confirmed case is doing to stop COVID-19. Due to Substack’s email length limits, I’ve had to divide into two emails. Look out for another email with countries between J and Z. And apologies for the opening seconds of the podcast, lol, I’m tired. And share this post by hitting the below button Afghanistan: 16 cases, 0 deaths Afghanistan announced the closure of all educational institutions Saturday and the extension of the country’s winter holidays for another month until April 21. The country has already cancelled all sports events after it reported its first case in late February. If the numbers are anywhere near correct, Afghanistan has done an excellent job in stemming the outbreak.Albania: 42 cases, 1 death Albania is rightly treating the coronavirus as an enemy of war. It banned the use of private cars this past weekend, and has already closed all garment factories, call centers, bars and restaurants. The country’s central bank also announced that holiday loan repayments can be postponed for three months.Algeria: 48 cases, 4 deaths The Algerian government shut down schools and universities and has limited travel to and from Europe. But that hasn’t stopped the mass protests that have been ongoing for the past year. Remarkably, I’m on the government’s side: please postpone the protests.Andorra: 1 case, 0 deaths All ski resorts have closed as Andorra tries to keep its figures rock bottom. Antigua and Barbuda: 1 case, 0 deaths Prime minister Gaston Browne announced a 30-day ban on all fetes, parties and similar social events. However, the red carpet premier of Wendy, parts of which were shot in Antigua, will still go ahead.Argentina: 45 cases, 2 deaths Argentina has banned entry of non-residents who have traveled to a country highly affected by coronavirus in the last 14 days.Armenia: 26 cases 0 deaths All schools, universities and kindergartens have been closed until at least March 23. All campaign rallies ahead of next month’s constitutional referendum have also been suspended.Aruba: 2 cases, 0 deaths Aruba has been largely unaffected but has now confirmed its first two cases. Travelers from Europe will be banned from entering the Caribbean island until at least March 31, with the exception of Aruban nationals.Australia: 297 cases, 3 deaths Due to its proximity to Wuhan, Australia was one of the first countries to deal with the outbreak. *If* the numbers are near correct, its government has done a good job of limiting the spread, so far. People arriving to the country must self-isolate for 14 days or face hefty fines. If only prime minister Scott Morrison was as tough on climate change…Austria: 860 cases, 1 death Sebastian Kurz introduced border checks with Switzerland and Liechtenstein, and banned flight connections with France, Spain and Switzerland. Kurz has also shut his country’s border with Italy, China, Iran and South Korea, the hardest hit countries so far.Azerbaijan: 23 cases, 1 death Little has been announced from a government riddled with corruption and fraud. What we do know is that Azerbaijan and Turkey ha

36 MIN2 w ago
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Coronavirus: What every country is doing (A-I)

#66 — Francesca Fiorentini (Comedian, Journalist)

Hello, and welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom! I’m vacationing in Greece this week, but that ain’t no damn reason for no podcast. Bad English aside, today’s guest is… Francesca Fiorentini, journalist, author, comedian and officially the funniest person to grace Inside The Newsroom’s airwaves. Francesca is the host and head writer of Newsbroke on AJ+, contributor to The Young Turks, and host of Red, White and Who? on MSNBC. Below’s a post-game of everything we talked about and more. But first, my top articles of the week… Enjoy $70,000 minimum salary — The boss of a card payments company in Seattle introduced a $70,000 minimum salary for his staff, and the gamble has paid offClimate crisis — Where does each Democratic candidate stand on the climate crisis?Super Tuesday — The 14 states’ economies can be split into four typesFrancesca The ‘Trump Effect’ on ComedyFrancesca began as a journalist and editor for multiple outlets before taking up stand up comedy in 2011, thus beginning her hilarious intertwined brand of comedy and journalism. She’s the latest up-and-comer of a trend made most famous by the legendary Jon Stewart, whose The Daily Show blurred the line between comedy and journalism so much that, at some points over the past decade, was the source of honest news in America. Stewart’s meteoric rise to fame shadowed the changing media landscape that allowed his epic rants and satirical takedowns of Fox News to go viral across the interwebs. Nowadays we have the likes of Michelle Wolf, Jon Oliver and Trevor Noah carrying the torch and blurring the line even further. And that’s where Francesca comes in, who managed to convince Al Jazeera to give her a shot with Newsbroke, and boy did it work out. MSNBC soon came calling with Red, White and Who?, which landed her across the table in a diner with Bernie Sanders.State of Cable NewsFor all our complaints about cable news, and don’t worry, there’s plenty in the next section, the Big Three cable news outlets are doing just fine. In fact, CNN, MSNBC and Fox News are doing more than fine: In 2018, they recorded a combined $5.3 billion in revenue, by far the most they’ve ever generated and a 36 percent increase since 2015. Much of that spike was due to the ‘Donald Trump Effect’, which has sparked a renewed ratings war between the networks. But while millions of people are still glued to their TV screens, the rise of alternative media on both sides of the political spectrum has fragmented the market even further. The term “24/7 news cycle” feels weirdly archaic.It’s because of the billions of dollars in the coffers that the cable networks must do better. Yes, they’ve 24 hours of programming to fill per day, and yes there’s nothing more in this world better than watching Wolf Blitzer stare dead-eyed into a camera on election night surrounded by 200 lobbyists and political operatives, but they have the resources to actually give us quality programs and not just excess garbage squeezed out from the sausage factory. Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown was an incredible look at the world through food and people. And Lisa Ling’s This Is Life brilliantly shines a light on life and culture around the globe. But the rest of cable news has turned into an opinion-fuelled orgy (yes I coined that all by myself ) which only fractures the political spectrum even more. Give us more Lisa Ling. Give us more Anthony Bourdain (RIP). Chris Matthews and Chuck Todd Show Their True Colors. It’s Brown.Cable news is doing great financially, there’s no denying that. But the thing about elections and controversial presidents like Trump is that they come in cycles, literally. As we discussed above, ratings and revenues have soared because of Trump’s provocative rhetoric and general idiocy, but the ratings and profits will inevitably recede to the flat numbers from before Trump when he leaves the White House, whether that’s in 2021 or 2025. But what’s less prone to election cycles is people’s

58 MINMAR 2
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#66 — Francesca Fiorentini (Comedian, Journalist)

#65 — Andrew Flowers (Journalist > Politician)

Hello! Welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom, where we’ll be interviewing a political candidate for the second straight week! Last week Paula Jean Swearengin, star of the Netflix documentary Knock Down The House came on to talk about her race for U.S. Senate and the issues facing West Virginia. This week’s guest is… Andrew Flowers, former data journalist for FiveThirtyEight and Indeed, current Democratic candidate for the Massachusetts state legislature. Below is a post-game of everything we talked about and more. But first, my most interesting articles of the week. Enjoy! South Carolina — How black Americans’ reverse migration is reshaping next state to voteHouston Astros — As Spring Training begins, the sign stealing scandal ain’t going away anytime soonKobe Bryant — How a city mourned the superstar’s deathAndrew Who Is Andrew Flowers and How the Hell Do Start a Political Campaign?Andrew is running for state representative of the 8th Norfolk District in Massachusetts, just southwest of the Boston metro area. Andrew’s a former economist for the Federal Reserve and Indeed, and former data journalist for FiveThirtyEight. where our paths just missed. Without sounding like a political ad, it’s because of this background that Andrew believes he’s the right man to tackle Massachusetts’ soaring living and housing costs, which we’ll get into shortly. I couldn’t find much data on how many journalists transition into politics, but I can’t imagine there’s too many. If you know anyone, or any databases out there, please email me. Okay, #politicalad over, let’s get to some issues…U.S. Uninsured Rate Is Climbing, But Not In MAWe’ve heard it time and time again: Obamacare aka the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was a great step for healthcare in America, but it didn’t go far enough. No matter where you sit on the healthcare debate, whether it’s Medicare For All, or “Medicare For All for those who want it”, whether it’s on a powerpoint presentation or post-it note, it’s alarming to see that the uninsured rate in America is beginning to rise for the first time since Obamacare was signed into law in 2010. And this is in spite of Obamacare reaching record popularity, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. According to Census data, 8.5 percent of Americans were uninsured in 2018, an increase of half a percent from a year before. That means around 30 million people are still without health insurance, which for someone from a country where 100% of people have access to free healthcare, is an unimaginable thought. Credit: Me Source: Kaiser Family FoundationUninsured Rate Per State, 2010-2018Andrew’s state of Massachusetts is an anomaly, where the uninsured rate is tied for lowest in the country with Washington D.C. at three percent. But unlike D.C. and any other state, Massachusetts had an uninsured rate of less than 5 percent before the ACA was even enacted, thanks to massive healthcare expansions signed into law in 2006, by our old friend Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor. Romney’s healthcare model eventually became the blueprint for Obamacare, and was successful partly because the state had a Republican governor, Democratic speaker of the House and a Democratic president in the Senate, meaning that both parties’ reputation was on the line. The same can’t be said about many other states.Traffic’s a B***hThe number one issue for Andrew in his district is transportation, more specifically traffic and congestion. I’ve only ever taken the Amtrak into Boston, which is a story for another newsletter, but thankfully I didn’t have to experience the worst traffic of any major metropolitan area in the country. Though I did have to sell a kidney to be able to afford the ticket. Yes, Boston is worse than Los Angeles, which will make Bostonians even angrier, according to transportation data firm Inrix. In fact, Boston is eighth worst in the ENTIRE WORLD, where people lose about 164 hours a year on average from sitt

49 MINFEB 28
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#65 — Andrew Flowers (Journalist > Politician)

#64 — Paula Jean Swearengin (U.S. Senate)

Hello! And welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom. Today’s guest is… the formidable Paula Jean Swearengin, star of the Netflix documentary Knock Down The House and current candidate for U.S. Senate from the great state of West Virginia. Paula Jean is the daughter of a long line of coal miners and has lived in the Mountain State all her life. And she’s also recently become a grandmother! She’s thus seen the destruction the coal industry has done to her people for generations, as well as how the opioid crisis ravaged her friends first hand. So, let’s tuck into an important episode, but first, some interesting articles. Enjoy What’s New?Dallas Morning News — The DMN broke with tradition this week by announcing that it won’t be endorsing anyone for president. F**k yeah!Jeff Bezos — The Amazon CEO pledged $10bn to climate change initiatives, though it was met with criticism that it wasn’t enough. Here’s a list of the largest climate change pledges so far — Bezos will be the thirdTaylor Swift — How the Queen of Music became the Queen of the Breakup SongCovering Bloomberg — How does a news organization cover a presidential candidate when said candidate is their boss?Paula Jean Who Is Paula Jean Swearengin?Paula Jean was born in Mullens, West Virginia, a town of about 1,350 people whose population has decreased by a third since 1990. Declining populations are all too common across the state, and will result in the state losing one electoral vote in the presidential election. Paula Jean burst onto the political scene in 2018 when she grabbed 30 percent of the vote from incumbent U.S. senator and moderate Democrat Joe Manchin in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate. This came two years after Bernie Sanders won 51 percent of the vote in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary to Hillary Clinton’s 36 percent, so clearly there’s a yearning for the progressive brand of politics Paula Jean represents. This time around Paula Jean faces another tough Democratic primary on May 12 against Richard Ojeda, a former state senator and apparently a brief candidate for president ♂ and Richie Robb, former mayor of South Charleston and not a former presidential candidate. The winner of the primary will face incumbent Republican Shelley Moore Capito in November. Who is Shelley Moore Capito?Incumbent Republican Shelley Moore Capito has been junior U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 2015, when she defeated then Democratic Secretary of State Natalie Tennant. She secured 62 percent of the vote, the largest victory margin for a Republican running in a statewide race in state history (more on the weirdness of West Virginia’s voting history later). Back then, Capito was seen as too liberal for the Tea Party, but overcame stiff opposition from anti-establishment conservatives. Since then, Capito has very much fulfilled the expectation of being a rank and file Republican, voting with Donald Trump 95.7 percent of the time. Though, to be fair, which is incredibly hard to do when talking about the GOP, Capito did come to the defense of FBI Director Christopher Wray back in December when Trump went on one of his delightful Twitter tirades. But that’s where the fairness ends. Capito has received $3.5 million in donations from the likes of Delta Air Lines, private prison operator GEO Group and billion-dollar hedge fund Elliot Management, according to Open Secrets. Because of the issues effecting West Virginia and its voting past, if Paula Jean can win the Democratic primary, she could give Capito a legitimate challenge, if not cause a shock upset.Like Me, PleaseBefore you read on, please like this edition ofInside The Newsroomby clicking the ️ below the title. That way I’ll appear in clever algorithms and more people will be able to read. Cheers.West Virginia’s Weird Voting RecordOkay, to the weirdness! At the presidential level, West Virginia is unequivocally a red state — the GOP has won West Virginia every election since 2000 when George W

40 MINFEB 18
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#64 — Paula Jean Swearengin (U.S. Senate)

#63 — Brian Klaas (Power Corrupts Podcast)

Hello! And welcome to another episode of Inside The Newsroom. Second newsletter of the week, after the elections in Cameroon, Ireland and Azerbaijan, which saw violence, confusion and division. Great. Today’s guest is… Brian Klaas, author, political scientist at University College London, columnist for The Washington Post and host of the Power Corrupts podcast. Brian is an expert on democracy and world politics, and he delved deep into the history of dark propaganda in his latest podcast episode. So below is a post-game analysis of everything we talked about and more. But first, my most interesting articles of the week… Enjoy! Malcolm X — Manhattan district attorney considers reopening case after Netflix documentaryCoronavirus — Shameful plug for my visual guide on how the virus has spread to 29 countries and killed 1,300 people and countingClearview — Friend of the pod Kashmir Hill examined the end of privacy as we know it in a truly disturbing pieceBrian What Is Propaganda?Not to be confused with marketing or public relations, our friends at Merriam Webster define propaganda as “the spreading of ideas, information, orrumorfor the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person.” It’s impossible to pinpoint exactly when propaganda was first used because, well, propaganda is as old as time. But the earliest records point to The Behistun Inscription in 515BC when Darius The Great engraved his military prowess into a large cliff in the ancient Persian Empire, aka Iran, followed by how he was the chosen one by God. Sound familiar? Around 200 years later, Alexander The Great, king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon put his face on coins, monuments and statues as a form of propaganda. Yep, definitely sounds familiar. The Behistun Inscription That all seems pretty harmless right? But as millennia, centuries and decades passed, propagandist techniques became far more nefarious. It’s generally agreed that the Catholic Church formalized propaganda and actually coined the term itself. In 1622, Pope Gregory XV set up the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith in Rome, and then in 1627, Pope Urban VIII followed that up and created the College of Propaganda, both of which provided a library for research and a school to train priests and missionaries to spread the church’s message overseas. We can tell just by the names of those two institutions that the concept of propaganda was still relatively benign and unknown to the general public. But as even more centuries and decades have passed, propaganda has become a term associated with some of the greatest atrocities and darkest evils the world has ever seen.When Did Propaganda Turn Evil?One can’t talk about the dark side of propaganda without mentioning the Nazis, so let’s do just that. Perhaps the most common question people have is why the German public couldn’t see through the Nazi propaganda machine, similar to how most sane people see right through Donald Trump’s b******t (more on that later). Many Germans did, and many voiced their opposition to Adolph Hitler’s rhetoric well before the country went to war with the world in 1939. Many Germans were punished in unthinkable ways. But as Brian pointed out on the podcast, propagandists like Hitler and his sidekick Joseph Goebbels didn’t just spread their lies and falsehoods right away. A smart propagandist first builds trust and credibility. For Hitler, that meant using events in the aftermath of World War One to his advantage. When the Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919 to formally end WW1, Germany was brought to its knees economically by the Allied Powers, who forced Germany into surrendering land and ordered them to pay reparations in the realm of $269 billion in today’s money. Naturally, Germany endured a devastating depression, which paved the way for Hitler’s rise. In hindsight, it was only a matter of time before the Nazis gained power, but the seeds were sewn well before they finally did

42 MINFEB 14
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#63 — Brian Klaas (Power Corrupts Podcast)

#62 — Krystal Ball (The Hill)

Hello! And welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom! Lots of exclamation marks today as we passed 2,500 subscribers over the weekend! Thank you for being part of this — I’m very humbled! Right, today’s guest is… Krystal Ball, former Democrat congressional candidate and co-host of Rising, The Hill’s daily political show. Krystal’s book, The Populist’s Guide To 2020!, co-authored with Saagar Enjeti, will be out on February 8, so we got into all the contents of the book, as well as The New York Times’ somewhat bizarre dual endorsement of Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. Below is a post-game analysis, but first, my favorite articles over the past week. Enjoy Remembering Kobe and Gianna Bryant — The world stopped on Sunday when we learned of the passing of Kobe and Gianna BryantFacebook is turning into a Republican platform — Who are the Republican political operatives calling the shots at Facebook?Greece elects first female president — High court judge and human r...

48 MINJAN 30
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#62 — Krystal Ball (The Hill)

#61 — Rachel Botsman (Trust Issues)

Hello! Welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom. Today’s guest is… Rachel Botsman, an author, podcast host, Trust Fellow at the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School, and an overall trust expert. Whether we like it or not, we live in an age where growing numbers of people believe the opinions of strangers over facts. Rachel has studied trust in the media for several years, so we dug deep into why believing facts isn’t popular anymore, and why correcting vulnerabilities within our brain could be the solution. Below is a post-game of everything we discussed and more. But first, here are some quick links to stories I enjoyed this past week. Enjoy Saudi Arabia Hacked Jeff Bezos — Scoop of the year so far as the prince of Saudi Arabia is alleged to have hacked the phone of Amazon’s Jeff BezosInstagram Face — How social media and plastic surgery have created a single, cyborgian lookNew York Times’ Dual Endorsement — The NYT broke tradition by endorsing two candida...

49 MINJAN 24
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#61 — Rachel Botsman (Trust Issues)

#60 — Michael Mann (Penn State)

Hello! Welcome to the first podcast of 2020! There’s no better guest to start the year with than the indefatigableMichael Mann, world renowned climate scientist from Penn State University. Michael’s spent the past month on a sabbatical in Australia, which has unfortunately meant that he’s seen the devastation of the wildfires in person. Climate change has had such an adverse effect on wildfires around the world, that there’s essentially no wildfire season anymore. In parts of Australia, they’re literally creating their own weather systems. Below is a post-game analysis of everything we discussed. Enjoy. Dangerous Climate Change Is Here, NowMichael couldn’t have picked a better, or worse, time to take a sabbatical in Sydney. On one hand, spending a month in a country that’s literally on fire isn’t ideal, but on the other, having Michael to testify and contextualize the damage first hand is a silver lining. As part of his research into the linkages between climate change and e...

49 MINJAN 16
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#60 — Michael Mann (Penn State)

Latest Episodes

#67 — Sarah Nöckel (Femstreet)

Hello! And welcome to another episode of Inside The Newsroom. We’re in crazy times, so I thought it’d be good to take a break with today’s podcast guest… Sarah Nöckel, founder of Femstreet, a newsletter dedicated to women in tech and venture capital. Femstreet has exploded in popularity and influence since Sarah started it about two years ago, and we dug deep into how she grew her following to more than 7,000 subscribers from nothing, and what influence she’s had in narrowing the inequality gap. On Friday we’ll have an update on the you know what, specifically looking at what each U.S. state has done and is doing to combat the spread. Until then, enjoy some normality and stay safe out there. Enjoy Picks of the WeekTulsi Gabbard Drops Out — Yes, Tulsi was still in the race until last week, and bizarrely endorsed Joe Biden despite disagreeing with him on almost everythingMarie Newman — Progressive Marie Newman beat incumbent Democrat Dan Lipinski in Illinois’ 3rd district primary, and is set to join The Squad in the House of RepsOlympics Postponed — Japan and the IOC held out as long as possible, but they finally announced the inevitable and moved the Tokyo Olympics to next summerSarah How Sarah Built FemstreetSarah launched Femstreet because she couldn’t find a central place for news on women making strides in the technology and venture capital industries. So in September 2017, Sarah published her first article to just a handful of subscribers. More than 100 editions of Femstreet later, Sarah now publishes to more than 7,000 subscribers. While the content is targeted at women in tech and VC, her lessons and experience can be used and applied by anyone anywhere. Four of the biggest lessons Sarah has learned, which I share and couldn’t put better myself, include…Niche doesn’t mean small. Like-minded people find each otherFocus. Depth not breadthGenuine personal brand is importantCreate for the best readers, not all the readersWhat you can do now: start something. It doesn’t matter what, but with more downtime in these crazy times, just start with the first block, and then add to it every day.The Gap Is Closing, But Not Fast EnoughEvery year the World Economic Forum publishes its Global Gender Gap Report, which covers aspects including Economic Participation and Opportunity, Educational Attainment, Health and Survival, and Political Empowerment. I dived into the 2020 edition to see what the current situation is and how large the strides we’re making are. Below is a summary of the main findings…Overall global gender parity is at 68.6 percent, up slightly from a year before. That figure is pulled up and down by different countries and subindexes, but overall, gender equality is improving.The subindex with the largest disparity is Political Empowerment — the number of women represented in parliaments around the world, followed by Economic Participation and Opportunity — the ability of women to enter the workplace. Educational Attainment and Health and Survival have 96.1 percent and 95.7 percent parity, respectively. The latter two are very positive.The number of women in parliament has improved dramatically in recent years, especially in countries such as Latvia, Spain and Thailand. But still only a quarter of the more than 35,000 global parliamentary seats are occupied by women. In some countries, women aren’t represented at all.The number of women in senior roles around the world has also increased. Globally, around 36 percent of senior private sector managers and public sector officials are women, a rise of about 2 percent from last year. This metric is also heavily weighted by a handful of countries.New problems exist lower down the ladder though. On average, only 55 percent of adult women are in the workforce, compared with 78 percent of men. Educational Attainment is another subindex weighted by developed countries in the west. Ten percent of women around the world are still illiterate. Significantly more investment i

45 MIN1 w ago
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#67 — Sarah Nöckel (Femstreet)

Coronavirus: What every country is doing (J-Z)

Hello. Welcome to Inside The Newsroom. We’re in unprecedented times. The coronavirus pandemic has swept through most of the planet, with total cases at more than 167,000 and deaths at 6,449, as of Monday morning. It’s quickly becoming one of the worst pandemics in history. But even with weeks of warning signs, governments around the world continue to be too lax and do too little. Here in the UK, the government have opted for a “herd immunity” strategy, happy for up to 80 percent of the 66 million population to contract the disease to build immunity while thousands of vulnerable people die in the process. Elsewhere in Europe, Spain has joined Italy in a full lockdown. But what about the rest of the world? For the record, the official numbers of cases and deaths are likely to be far higher due to the lack of tests available and carried out. With that said, let’s take a look at what each country with a confirmed case is doing to stop COVID-19. Due to Substack’s email length limits, I’ve had to divide into two emails. Look out for another email with countries between A and I. And share this post by hitting the below button Jamaica: 10 cases, 0 deaths Prime minister Andrew Holness declared the island a disaster area, meaning the government can do whatever it takes to stem the spread, and has deployed soldiers and police in the streets to restrict movement.Japan: 839 cases, 22 deaths One of the first countries outside of China to have a confirmed case, it’s amazing Japan has even been able to keep its cases to four figures. Still, prime minister Abe says the Olympics will go ahead in July still. I don’t believe him. Jordan: 8 cases, 0 deaths Country will ban all incoming and outgoing flights from tomorrow, and has already banned public gatherings and events. Schools and universities are closed for two weeks, as well as tourist sites and sports facilities.Kazakhstan: 9 cases, 0 deaths State of emergency has been declared which means a nationwide quarantine will restrict entry to and from the country.Kenya: 3 cases, 0 deaths Travelers from any country with a confirmed case have been banned, and schools have been suspended.Kuwait: 112 cases, 0 deaths Commercial facilities, shopping malls and public markets have been closed. No more than five people are allowed in grocery stories at the same time, and everyone is required to keep at least one meter away from each other.Latvia: 30 cases, 0 deaths All travel has been banned as of midnight last night, as well as public gatherings of more than 50 people. Latvians and people with residents will still be allowed back in.Lebanon: 110 cases, 3 deaths Medical state of emergency declared as the country’s financial crisis threatens to risk essential medical supplies. Restaurants and many public venues are already closed, and flights from many corona-infected countries have been halted.Liechtenstein: 4 cases, 0 deaths Little reported out of Liechtenstein.Lithuania: 12 cases, 0 deaths Whole country under quarantine for two weeks. Borders closed to travelers and non-essential stores have been closed.Luxembourg: 59 cases, 1 death Country is in lockdown as number of cases are slowly starting to rise. Malaysia: 428 cases, 0 deaths An 80 percent spike in the number of cases, with most being linked to a religious gathering attended by 16,000 people. Smart stuff. The region is a hotbed for mass outbreaks as attendees return home to neighbouring countries. Cheers Malaysia. Maldives: 13 cases, 0 deaths While most countries are shutting down, the Maldives have been busy building a luxury quarantine resort. The hotel was built in just 10 days by around 50 workers. That sounds sturdy. Don’t go to the Maldives.Malta: 21 cases, 0 deaths Country is on lockdown.Martinique: 9 cases, 0 deaths Little reported on government measures, as the Costa Favolosa cruise ship has been anchored ashore over the weekend. Mauritania: 1 case, 0 deaths First case reported on Saturday. Few reports on government action so far

36 MIN2 w ago
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Coronavirus: What every country is doing (J-Z)

Coronavirus: What every country is doing (A-I)

Hello. Welcome to Inside The Newsroom. We’re in unprecedented times. The coronavirus pandemic has swept through most of the planet, with total cases at more than 167,000 and deaths at 6,449, as of Monday morning. It’s quickly becoming one of the worst pandemics in history. But even with weeks of warning signs, governments around the world continue to be too lax and do too little. Here in the UK, the government have opted for a “herd immunity” strategy, happy for up to 80 percent of the 66 million population to contract the disease to build immunity while thousands of vulnerable people die in the process. Elsewhere in Europe, Spain has joined Italy in a full lockdown. But what about the rest of the world? For the record, the official numbers of cases and deaths are likely to be far higher due to the lack of tests available and carried out. With that said, let’s take a look at what each country with a confirmed case is doing to stop COVID-19. Due to Substack’s email length limits, I’ve had to divide into two emails. Look out for another email with countries between J and Z. And apologies for the opening seconds of the podcast, lol, I’m tired. And share this post by hitting the below button Afghanistan: 16 cases, 0 deaths Afghanistan announced the closure of all educational institutions Saturday and the extension of the country’s winter holidays for another month until April 21. The country has already cancelled all sports events after it reported its first case in late February. If the numbers are anywhere near correct, Afghanistan has done an excellent job in stemming the outbreak.Albania: 42 cases, 1 death Albania is rightly treating the coronavirus as an enemy of war. It banned the use of private cars this past weekend, and has already closed all garment factories, call centers, bars and restaurants. The country’s central bank also announced that holiday loan repayments can be postponed for three months.Algeria: 48 cases, 4 deaths The Algerian government shut down schools and universities and has limited travel to and from Europe. But that hasn’t stopped the mass protests that have been ongoing for the past year. Remarkably, I’m on the government’s side: please postpone the protests.Andorra: 1 case, 0 deaths All ski resorts have closed as Andorra tries to keep its figures rock bottom. Antigua and Barbuda: 1 case, 0 deaths Prime minister Gaston Browne announced a 30-day ban on all fetes, parties and similar social events. However, the red carpet premier of Wendy, parts of which were shot in Antigua, will still go ahead.Argentina: 45 cases, 2 deaths Argentina has banned entry of non-residents who have traveled to a country highly affected by coronavirus in the last 14 days.Armenia: 26 cases 0 deaths All schools, universities and kindergartens have been closed until at least March 23. All campaign rallies ahead of next month’s constitutional referendum have also been suspended.Aruba: 2 cases, 0 deaths Aruba has been largely unaffected but has now confirmed its first two cases. Travelers from Europe will be banned from entering the Caribbean island until at least March 31, with the exception of Aruban nationals.Australia: 297 cases, 3 deaths Due to its proximity to Wuhan, Australia was one of the first countries to deal with the outbreak. *If* the numbers are near correct, its government has done a good job of limiting the spread, so far. People arriving to the country must self-isolate for 14 days or face hefty fines. If only prime minister Scott Morrison was as tough on climate change…Austria: 860 cases, 1 death Sebastian Kurz introduced border checks with Switzerland and Liechtenstein, and banned flight connections with France, Spain and Switzerland. Kurz has also shut his country’s border with Italy, China, Iran and South Korea, the hardest hit countries so far.Azerbaijan: 23 cases, 1 death Little has been announced from a government riddled with corruption and fraud. What we do know is that Azerbaijan and Turkey ha

36 MIN2 w ago
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Coronavirus: What every country is doing (A-I)

#66 — Francesca Fiorentini (Comedian, Journalist)

Hello, and welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom! I’m vacationing in Greece this week, but that ain’t no damn reason for no podcast. Bad English aside, today’s guest is… Francesca Fiorentini, journalist, author, comedian and officially the funniest person to grace Inside The Newsroom’s airwaves. Francesca is the host and head writer of Newsbroke on AJ+, contributor to The Young Turks, and host of Red, White and Who? on MSNBC. Below’s a post-game of everything we talked about and more. But first, my top articles of the week… Enjoy $70,000 minimum salary — The boss of a card payments company in Seattle introduced a $70,000 minimum salary for his staff, and the gamble has paid offClimate crisis — Where does each Democratic candidate stand on the climate crisis?Super Tuesday — The 14 states’ economies can be split into four typesFrancesca The ‘Trump Effect’ on ComedyFrancesca began as a journalist and editor for multiple outlets before taking up stand up comedy in 2011, thus beginning her hilarious intertwined brand of comedy and journalism. She’s the latest up-and-comer of a trend made most famous by the legendary Jon Stewart, whose The Daily Show blurred the line between comedy and journalism so much that, at some points over the past decade, was the source of honest news in America. Stewart’s meteoric rise to fame shadowed the changing media landscape that allowed his epic rants and satirical takedowns of Fox News to go viral across the interwebs. Nowadays we have the likes of Michelle Wolf, Jon Oliver and Trevor Noah carrying the torch and blurring the line even further. And that’s where Francesca comes in, who managed to convince Al Jazeera to give her a shot with Newsbroke, and boy did it work out. MSNBC soon came calling with Red, White and Who?, which landed her across the table in a diner with Bernie Sanders.State of Cable NewsFor all our complaints about cable news, and don’t worry, there’s plenty in the next section, the Big Three cable news outlets are doing just fine. In fact, CNN, MSNBC and Fox News are doing more than fine: In 2018, they recorded a combined $5.3 billion in revenue, by far the most they’ve ever generated and a 36 percent increase since 2015. Much of that spike was due to the ‘Donald Trump Effect’, which has sparked a renewed ratings war between the networks. But while millions of people are still glued to their TV screens, the rise of alternative media on both sides of the political spectrum has fragmented the market even further. The term “24/7 news cycle” feels weirdly archaic.It’s because of the billions of dollars in the coffers that the cable networks must do better. Yes, they’ve 24 hours of programming to fill per day, and yes there’s nothing more in this world better than watching Wolf Blitzer stare dead-eyed into a camera on election night surrounded by 200 lobbyists and political operatives, but they have the resources to actually give us quality programs and not just excess garbage squeezed out from the sausage factory. Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown was an incredible look at the world through food and people. And Lisa Ling’s This Is Life brilliantly shines a light on life and culture around the globe. But the rest of cable news has turned into an opinion-fuelled orgy (yes I coined that all by myself ) which only fractures the political spectrum even more. Give us more Lisa Ling. Give us more Anthony Bourdain (RIP). Chris Matthews and Chuck Todd Show Their True Colors. It’s Brown.Cable news is doing great financially, there’s no denying that. But the thing about elections and controversial presidents like Trump is that they come in cycles, literally. As we discussed above, ratings and revenues have soared because of Trump’s provocative rhetoric and general idiocy, but the ratings and profits will inevitably recede to the flat numbers from before Trump when he leaves the White House, whether that’s in 2021 or 2025. But what’s less prone to election cycles is people’s

58 MINMAR 2
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#66 — Francesca Fiorentini (Comedian, Journalist)

#65 — Andrew Flowers (Journalist > Politician)

Hello! Welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom, where we’ll be interviewing a political candidate for the second straight week! Last week Paula Jean Swearengin, star of the Netflix documentary Knock Down The House came on to talk about her race for U.S. Senate and the issues facing West Virginia. This week’s guest is… Andrew Flowers, former data journalist for FiveThirtyEight and Indeed, current Democratic candidate for the Massachusetts state legislature. Below is a post-game of everything we talked about and more. But first, my most interesting articles of the week. Enjoy! South Carolina — How black Americans’ reverse migration is reshaping next state to voteHouston Astros — As Spring Training begins, the sign stealing scandal ain’t going away anytime soonKobe Bryant — How a city mourned the superstar’s deathAndrew Who Is Andrew Flowers and How the Hell Do Start a Political Campaign?Andrew is running for state representative of the 8th Norfolk District in Massachusetts, just southwest of the Boston metro area. Andrew’s a former economist for the Federal Reserve and Indeed, and former data journalist for FiveThirtyEight. where our paths just missed. Without sounding like a political ad, it’s because of this background that Andrew believes he’s the right man to tackle Massachusetts’ soaring living and housing costs, which we’ll get into shortly. I couldn’t find much data on how many journalists transition into politics, but I can’t imagine there’s too many. If you know anyone, or any databases out there, please email me. Okay, #politicalad over, let’s get to some issues…U.S. Uninsured Rate Is Climbing, But Not In MAWe’ve heard it time and time again: Obamacare aka the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was a great step for healthcare in America, but it didn’t go far enough. No matter where you sit on the healthcare debate, whether it’s Medicare For All, or “Medicare For All for those who want it”, whether it’s on a powerpoint presentation or post-it note, it’s alarming to see that the uninsured rate in America is beginning to rise for the first time since Obamacare was signed into law in 2010. And this is in spite of Obamacare reaching record popularity, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. According to Census data, 8.5 percent of Americans were uninsured in 2018, an increase of half a percent from a year before. That means around 30 million people are still without health insurance, which for someone from a country where 100% of people have access to free healthcare, is an unimaginable thought. Credit: Me Source: Kaiser Family FoundationUninsured Rate Per State, 2010-2018Andrew’s state of Massachusetts is an anomaly, where the uninsured rate is tied for lowest in the country with Washington D.C. at three percent. But unlike D.C. and any other state, Massachusetts had an uninsured rate of less than 5 percent before the ACA was even enacted, thanks to massive healthcare expansions signed into law in 2006, by our old friend Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor. Romney’s healthcare model eventually became the blueprint for Obamacare, and was successful partly because the state had a Republican governor, Democratic speaker of the House and a Democratic president in the Senate, meaning that both parties’ reputation was on the line. The same can’t be said about many other states.Traffic’s a B***hThe number one issue for Andrew in his district is transportation, more specifically traffic and congestion. I’ve only ever taken the Amtrak into Boston, which is a story for another newsletter, but thankfully I didn’t have to experience the worst traffic of any major metropolitan area in the country. Though I did have to sell a kidney to be able to afford the ticket. Yes, Boston is worse than Los Angeles, which will make Bostonians even angrier, according to transportation data firm Inrix. In fact, Boston is eighth worst in the ENTIRE WORLD, where people lose about 164 hours a year on average from sitt

49 MINFEB 28
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#65 — Andrew Flowers (Journalist > Politician)

#64 — Paula Jean Swearengin (U.S. Senate)

Hello! And welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom. Today’s guest is… the formidable Paula Jean Swearengin, star of the Netflix documentary Knock Down The House and current candidate for U.S. Senate from the great state of West Virginia. Paula Jean is the daughter of a long line of coal miners and has lived in the Mountain State all her life. And she’s also recently become a grandmother! She’s thus seen the destruction the coal industry has done to her people for generations, as well as how the opioid crisis ravaged her friends first hand. So, let’s tuck into an important episode, but first, some interesting articles. Enjoy What’s New?Dallas Morning News — The DMN broke with tradition this week by announcing that it won’t be endorsing anyone for president. F**k yeah!Jeff Bezos — The Amazon CEO pledged $10bn to climate change initiatives, though it was met with criticism that it wasn’t enough. Here’s a list of the largest climate change pledges so far — Bezos will be the thirdTaylor Swift — How the Queen of Music became the Queen of the Breakup SongCovering Bloomberg — How does a news organization cover a presidential candidate when said candidate is their boss?Paula Jean Who Is Paula Jean Swearengin?Paula Jean was born in Mullens, West Virginia, a town of about 1,350 people whose population has decreased by a third since 1990. Declining populations are all too common across the state, and will result in the state losing one electoral vote in the presidential election. Paula Jean burst onto the political scene in 2018 when she grabbed 30 percent of the vote from incumbent U.S. senator and moderate Democrat Joe Manchin in the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate. This came two years after Bernie Sanders won 51 percent of the vote in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary to Hillary Clinton’s 36 percent, so clearly there’s a yearning for the progressive brand of politics Paula Jean represents. This time around Paula Jean faces another tough Democratic primary on May 12 against Richard Ojeda, a former state senator and apparently a brief candidate for president ♂ and Richie Robb, former mayor of South Charleston and not a former presidential candidate. The winner of the primary will face incumbent Republican Shelley Moore Capito in November. Who is Shelley Moore Capito?Incumbent Republican Shelley Moore Capito has been junior U.S. Senator from West Virginia since 2015, when she defeated then Democratic Secretary of State Natalie Tennant. She secured 62 percent of the vote, the largest victory margin for a Republican running in a statewide race in state history (more on the weirdness of West Virginia’s voting history later). Back then, Capito was seen as too liberal for the Tea Party, but overcame stiff opposition from anti-establishment conservatives. Since then, Capito has very much fulfilled the expectation of being a rank and file Republican, voting with Donald Trump 95.7 percent of the time. Though, to be fair, which is incredibly hard to do when talking about the GOP, Capito did come to the defense of FBI Director Christopher Wray back in December when Trump went on one of his delightful Twitter tirades. But that’s where the fairness ends. Capito has received $3.5 million in donations from the likes of Delta Air Lines, private prison operator GEO Group and billion-dollar hedge fund Elliot Management, according to Open Secrets. Because of the issues effecting West Virginia and its voting past, if Paula Jean can win the Democratic primary, she could give Capito a legitimate challenge, if not cause a shock upset.Like Me, PleaseBefore you read on, please like this edition ofInside The Newsroomby clicking the ️ below the title. That way I’ll appear in clever algorithms and more people will be able to read. Cheers.West Virginia’s Weird Voting RecordOkay, to the weirdness! At the presidential level, West Virginia is unequivocally a red state — the GOP has won West Virginia every election since 2000 when George W

40 MINFEB 18
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#64 — Paula Jean Swearengin (U.S. Senate)

#63 — Brian Klaas (Power Corrupts Podcast)

Hello! And welcome to another episode of Inside The Newsroom. Second newsletter of the week, after the elections in Cameroon, Ireland and Azerbaijan, which saw violence, confusion and division. Great. Today’s guest is… Brian Klaas, author, political scientist at University College London, columnist for The Washington Post and host of the Power Corrupts podcast. Brian is an expert on democracy and world politics, and he delved deep into the history of dark propaganda in his latest podcast episode. So below is a post-game analysis of everything we talked about and more. But first, my most interesting articles of the week… Enjoy! Malcolm X — Manhattan district attorney considers reopening case after Netflix documentaryCoronavirus — Shameful plug for my visual guide on how the virus has spread to 29 countries and killed 1,300 people and countingClearview — Friend of the pod Kashmir Hill examined the end of privacy as we know it in a truly disturbing pieceBrian What Is Propaganda?Not to be confused with marketing or public relations, our friends at Merriam Webster define propaganda as “the spreading of ideas, information, orrumorfor the purpose of helping or injuring an institution, a cause, or a person.” It’s impossible to pinpoint exactly when propaganda was first used because, well, propaganda is as old as time. But the earliest records point to The Behistun Inscription in 515BC when Darius The Great engraved his military prowess into a large cliff in the ancient Persian Empire, aka Iran, followed by how he was the chosen one by God. Sound familiar? Around 200 years later, Alexander The Great, king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon put his face on coins, monuments and statues as a form of propaganda. Yep, definitely sounds familiar. The Behistun Inscription That all seems pretty harmless right? But as millennia, centuries and decades passed, propagandist techniques became far more nefarious. It’s generally agreed that the Catholic Church formalized propaganda and actually coined the term itself. In 1622, Pope Gregory XV set up the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith in Rome, and then in 1627, Pope Urban VIII followed that up and created the College of Propaganda, both of which provided a library for research and a school to train priests and missionaries to spread the church’s message overseas. We can tell just by the names of those two institutions that the concept of propaganda was still relatively benign and unknown to the general public. But as even more centuries and decades have passed, propaganda has become a term associated with some of the greatest atrocities and darkest evils the world has ever seen.When Did Propaganda Turn Evil?One can’t talk about the dark side of propaganda without mentioning the Nazis, so let’s do just that. Perhaps the most common question people have is why the German public couldn’t see through the Nazi propaganda machine, similar to how most sane people see right through Donald Trump’s b******t (more on that later). Many Germans did, and many voiced their opposition to Adolph Hitler’s rhetoric well before the country went to war with the world in 1939. Many Germans were punished in unthinkable ways. But as Brian pointed out on the podcast, propagandists like Hitler and his sidekick Joseph Goebbels didn’t just spread their lies and falsehoods right away. A smart propagandist first builds trust and credibility. For Hitler, that meant using events in the aftermath of World War One to his advantage. When the Treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919 to formally end WW1, Germany was brought to its knees economically by the Allied Powers, who forced Germany into surrendering land and ordered them to pay reparations in the realm of $269 billion in today’s money. Naturally, Germany endured a devastating depression, which paved the way for Hitler’s rise. In hindsight, it was only a matter of time before the Nazis gained power, but the seeds were sewn well before they finally did

42 MINFEB 14
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#63 — Brian Klaas (Power Corrupts Podcast)

#62 — Krystal Ball (The Hill)

Hello! And welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom! Lots of exclamation marks today as we passed 2,500 subscribers over the weekend! Thank you for being part of this — I’m very humbled! Right, today’s guest is… Krystal Ball, former Democrat congressional candidate and co-host of Rising, The Hill’s daily political show. Krystal’s book, The Populist’s Guide To 2020!, co-authored with Saagar Enjeti, will be out on February 8, so we got into all the contents of the book, as well as The New York Times’ somewhat bizarre dual endorsement of Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. Below is a post-game analysis, but first, my favorite articles over the past week. Enjoy Remembering Kobe and Gianna Bryant — The world stopped on Sunday when we learned of the passing of Kobe and Gianna BryantFacebook is turning into a Republican platform — Who are the Republican political operatives calling the shots at Facebook?Greece elects first female president — High court judge and human r...

48 MINJAN 30
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#62 — Krystal Ball (The Hill)

#61 — Rachel Botsman (Trust Issues)

Hello! Welcome to another edition of Inside The Newsroom. Today’s guest is… Rachel Botsman, an author, podcast host, Trust Fellow at the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School, and an overall trust expert. Whether we like it or not, we live in an age where growing numbers of people believe the opinions of strangers over facts. Rachel has studied trust in the media for several years, so we dug deep into why believing facts isn’t popular anymore, and why correcting vulnerabilities within our brain could be the solution. Below is a post-game of everything we discussed and more. But first, here are some quick links to stories I enjoyed this past week. Enjoy Saudi Arabia Hacked Jeff Bezos — Scoop of the year so far as the prince of Saudi Arabia is alleged to have hacked the phone of Amazon’s Jeff BezosInstagram Face — How social media and plastic surgery have created a single, cyborgian lookNew York Times’ Dual Endorsement — The NYT broke tradition by endorsing two candida...

49 MINJAN 24
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#61 — Rachel Botsman (Trust Issues)

#60 — Michael Mann (Penn State)

Hello! Welcome to the first podcast of 2020! There’s no better guest to start the year with than the indefatigableMichael Mann, world renowned climate scientist from Penn State University. Michael’s spent the past month on a sabbatical in Australia, which has unfortunately meant that he’s seen the devastation of the wildfires in person. Climate change has had such an adverse effect on wildfires around the world, that there’s essentially no wildfire season anymore. In parts of Australia, they’re literally creating their own weather systems. Below is a post-game analysis of everything we discussed. Enjoy. Dangerous Climate Change Is Here, NowMichael couldn’t have picked a better, or worse, time to take a sabbatical in Sydney. On one hand, spending a month in a country that’s literally on fire isn’t ideal, but on the other, having Michael to testify and contextualize the damage first hand is a silver lining. As part of his research into the linkages between climate change and e...

49 MINJAN 16
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#60 — Michael Mann (Penn State)
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