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MPR News with Kerri Miller

Minnesota Public Radio

13
Followers
60
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MPR News with Kerri Miller

MPR News with Kerri Miller

Minnesota Public Radio

13
Followers
60
Plays
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Conversations on news and culture with Kerri Miller. Weekdays from MPR News.

Latest Episodes

Minnesota health officials discuss COVID-19 transmission in the state

Updated: 5:48 p.m. Minnesota set a record high for new COVID-19 cases over the weekend, just weeks before the school year is set to get under way. This has many Minnesotans worried that their friends and families are not taking the virus seriously enough. Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm and Director of Infectious Diseases Kris Ehresmann acknowledged those concerns in a conversation with MPR News host Kerri Miller on Monday. Latest on COVID-19 in MN Worries rise over isolation in long-term care State's new COVID-19 guidance To allow more visitors in long-term care A portion of this conversation has been transcribed and lightly edited for clarity. Listen to the full conversation with the audio player above. How have we gotten accustomed to the idea that 1,000 Americans are dying a day from this disease and that is a plateau that may not last once we get to fall. How have we adjusted to the idea of this? Commissioner Jan Malcolm: That's a really incredibly impor...

48 MIN9 h ago
Comments
Minnesota health officials discuss COVID-19 transmission in the state

Three voices on what they’re reading in 2020

In recent weeks, we’ve returned to some of our favorite conversations with nonfiction authors including Ijeoma Oluo, Ibram X. Kendi and Verna Myers about race. But that isn’t the only type of written work that looks at and offers insight on the racial reckoning our nation is facing amid a pandemic. MPR News host Kerri Miller talked with two authors and the head of the National Book Foundation about what’s been on their reading list in terms of fiction, memoirs and poetry this year. Guests: Brit Bennett is one of the National Book Foundation’s 5 under 35 2016 honorees. Her first novel, “The Mothers,” was a bestseller and her latest novel is titled “The Vanishing Half.” Lisa Lucas is the executive director of the National Book Foundation. Kiese Laymon is the author of several works including his latest, “Heavy: An American Memoir.” Here’s what Bennett, Lucas and Laymon are reading: Novel: “The Glass Hotel” by Emily St. John Mandel Novel: “Actress” by Anne Enright Essay:...

56 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Three voices on what they’re reading in 2020

Freedom libraries designed to liberate the minds of prisoners

Earlier this summer, the Mellon Foundation — the largest humanities philanthropy in the United States — announced it was shifting its mission to focus more on social justice. It backed up that announcement with a $5.3 million grant to fund a collection of books to be placed in 1,000 prisons and juvenile detention centers across all 50 states. The Million Book Project was dreamed up by poet and legal scholar Reginald Dwayne Betts. It intends to curate a capsule collection of 500 books — Betts calls them “freedom libraries” — that will include literature, history, poetry and social thought, with an emphasis on books by Black writers and thinkers. Thursday morning, MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with Betts and Mellon Foundation president Elizabeth Alexander about the project and what they hope to accomplish. Here’s a list of books and authors suggested by Miller, listeners and our guests: Fiction: “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood; “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison;...

48 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Freedom libraries designed to liberate the minds of prisoners

What does it mean to be a woman in America today?

Today, women lead voter turnout in the United States. They have voted at higher rates than men in every presidential election since 1989 — and in midterm elections too. Women have had the right to vote for less than half of American history. August 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment. And racist policies kept too many women of color from the polls for decades beyond that. As we mark this anniversary and weigh that history, MPR News with Kerri Miller is asking: What does it mean to be a woman in America today? During the month of August, we’ll explore this question and look at how women have shaped American culture, politics and power in the last century. Kerri Miller kicked off the series by talking with historian Martha S. Jones about how Black women shaped the country and had to fight their own battle for the right to vote. Guest: Martha S. Jones is a historian and writer. Her forthcoming book is “Vanguard: How Black Women Overcame Barri...

48 MIN5 d ago
Comments
What does it mean to be a woman in America today?

What the pandemic has revealed about climate change views, activism

2020 feels like a whirlwind of news and change. But even as new issues — like the coronavirus have arisen — previous problems haven’t gone away and their depths have been highlighted or exacerbated amid the pandemic. One of those issues is climate change. In the early months of the pandemic, the levels of two major air pollutants drastically dropped. And the need for fossil fuels declined as planes were grounded due to the lack of travel. But the world is trying to return to various economic and social activities as people figure out how to live with the virus, and so the green effects of the early months of quarantine are likely fleeting. In all of this, climate change activists are watching and weighing the lessons of the pandemic as they move forward. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with a meteorologist and a biologist on Tuesday at 9 a.m. about what we’re learning about climate change, education and activism in this period of transformation. Guests: Eric Holthaus is a meteo...

43 MIN6 d ago
Comments
What the pandemic has revealed about climate change views, activism

Michael Osterholm on where we are now with the COVID-19 pandemic

More than 150,000 people in the U.S. have died after being infected with COVID-19. It’s a sobering milestone that comes at a time when an increasing number of states are seeing an uptick in infections and hospitalizations. What we’re experiencing now is something Minnesota epidemiologist Michael Osterholm has likened to a “national forest fire.” During a time of surging cases, he told NPR, contact tracing and traditional testing aren’t going to go far enough to slow down the spread. MPR News host Kerri Miller talked with Osterholm about the management of the pandemic, vaccine development and the possibility of additional lockdowns. Guest: Dr. Michael Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy at the University of Minnesota.

48 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Michael Osterholm on where we are now with the COVID-19 pandemic

Minnesotans react after state releases fall guidance for schools

Gov. Tim Walz released the state’s much-awaited guidance for how schools should reopen this fall, encouraging a return to in-person classroom teaching. However, the state is leaving it up to the districts to make the call on whether to rely on in-person, online or a combination based on local health conditions. Health data and analysis will be offered to districts during the upcoming school year to help leaders, school staff and families determine if they need to alter plans. Meanwhile, the state will also pay for masks for all staff and students, along with the cost of testing. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with superintendents, principals and listeners about what’s in store for their schools and communities. Guests: Christine Tucci Osorio is the superintendent of North St. Paul/Maplewood/Oakdale Independent School District. Jeff Pesta is superintendent of the Deer River Independent School District. Jeannie Mayer is principal of Menahga Elementary School. Abdirizak Abdi is pri...

75 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Minnesotans react after state releases fall guidance for schools

An ER doctor shares lessons in first book, ‘The Beauty in Breaking’

Dr. Michele Harper says she doesn’t have any special powers. But for 36 hours every week, she works in a hospital emergency room and she has several jobs. She writes: “... I am called upon to be salve, antidote, and sometimes Charon. Most of the time my job is to keep death at bay. When I am successful, I send the patient back out into the world. When I’m not, I am there as life passes away.” In her first book, “The Beauty of Breaking,” Harper details what she’s learned about life, death and self-healing as a Black emergency room physician in the United States. She spoke with MPR News host Kerri Miller about the power in ‘breaking’ and what it means for growth in our lives. Guest: Dr. Michele Harper has worked as an emergency room physician for more than a decade. “The Beauty in Breaking” is her first book. To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above.Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts , Spotify...

47 MIN1 w ago
Comments
An ER doctor shares lessons in first book, ‘The Beauty in Breaking’

The impact of white evangelicals on U.S. politics

The majority of white evangelical support went to President Donald Trump in the 2016 election, and it’s a voting bloc that continues to hold the attention of campaigns and political analysts in the lead-up to the 2020 election. That support in 2016 was’t necessarily a transactional or a “lesser of two evils” choice. Rather, it’s “the culmination of evangelicals’ embrace of militant masculinity, an ideology that enshrines patriarchal authority and condones the callous display of power, at home and abroad,” according to author and history professor Kristin Kobes Du Mez in her latest book. She also writes that it’s not a change that started with Trump, nor will it end when he’s no longer in office. In “Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation,” Kobes Du Mez explores Christian manhood, the history and culture of this group and where American evangelicalism goes from here. She joined MPR News host Kerri Miller in conversation Tuesd...

--1 w ago
Comments
The impact of white evangelicals on U.S. politics

As $600 benefits nears expiration; people ask what’s next

Supplementary unemployment benefits are likely to end before Congress can pass legislation on a replacement package. House Democrats have been pushing to extend the extra $600 per week unemployment benefit, and on Monday Senate Republicans shared their plan to trim that temporary benefit to $200 per week. This news comes as unemployment claims are ratcheting back up. It’s estimated that 1 in 5 workers is collecting unemployment benefits. The spread of COVID-19 has sharpened the focus on long standing economic inequality and stagnant wages. Before the pandemic, the number of Americans working low wage jobs was close to half. Those Americans experienced the largest share of job cuts, according to an early report from the Federal Reserve. MPR News guest host and senior economics contributor Chris Farrell spoke with two economists about unemployment and the path to an economic recovery. Guests: Jared Bernstein is a senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. He previou...

--2 w ago
Comments
As $600 benefits nears expiration; people ask what’s next

Latest Episodes

Minnesota health officials discuss COVID-19 transmission in the state

Updated: 5:48 p.m. Minnesota set a record high for new COVID-19 cases over the weekend, just weeks before the school year is set to get under way. This has many Minnesotans worried that their friends and families are not taking the virus seriously enough. Minnesota Department of Health Commissioner Jan Malcolm and Director of Infectious Diseases Kris Ehresmann acknowledged those concerns in a conversation with MPR News host Kerri Miller on Monday. Latest on COVID-19 in MN Worries rise over isolation in long-term care State's new COVID-19 guidance To allow more visitors in long-term care A portion of this conversation has been transcribed and lightly edited for clarity. Listen to the full conversation with the audio player above. How have we gotten accustomed to the idea that 1,000 Americans are dying a day from this disease and that is a plateau that may not last once we get to fall. How have we adjusted to the idea of this? Commissioner Jan Malcolm: That's a really incredibly impor...

48 MIN9 h ago
Comments
Minnesota health officials discuss COVID-19 transmission in the state

Three voices on what they’re reading in 2020

In recent weeks, we’ve returned to some of our favorite conversations with nonfiction authors including Ijeoma Oluo, Ibram X. Kendi and Verna Myers about race. But that isn’t the only type of written work that looks at and offers insight on the racial reckoning our nation is facing amid a pandemic. MPR News host Kerri Miller talked with two authors and the head of the National Book Foundation about what’s been on their reading list in terms of fiction, memoirs and poetry this year. Guests: Brit Bennett is one of the National Book Foundation’s 5 under 35 2016 honorees. Her first novel, “The Mothers,” was a bestseller and her latest novel is titled “The Vanishing Half.” Lisa Lucas is the executive director of the National Book Foundation. Kiese Laymon is the author of several works including his latest, “Heavy: An American Memoir.” Here’s what Bennett, Lucas and Laymon are reading: Novel: “The Glass Hotel” by Emily St. John Mandel Novel: “Actress” by Anne Enright Essay:...

56 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Three voices on what they’re reading in 2020

Freedom libraries designed to liberate the minds of prisoners

Earlier this summer, the Mellon Foundation — the largest humanities philanthropy in the United States — announced it was shifting its mission to focus more on social justice. It backed up that announcement with a $5.3 million grant to fund a collection of books to be placed in 1,000 prisons and juvenile detention centers across all 50 states. The Million Book Project was dreamed up by poet and legal scholar Reginald Dwayne Betts. It intends to curate a capsule collection of 500 books — Betts calls them “freedom libraries” — that will include literature, history, poetry and social thought, with an emphasis on books by Black writers and thinkers. Thursday morning, MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with Betts and Mellon Foundation president Elizabeth Alexander about the project and what they hope to accomplish. Here’s a list of books and authors suggested by Miller, listeners and our guests: Fiction: “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood; “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison;...

48 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Freedom libraries designed to liberate the minds of prisoners

What does it mean to be a woman in America today?

Today, women lead voter turnout in the United States. They have voted at higher rates than men in every presidential election since 1989 — and in midterm elections too. Women have had the right to vote for less than half of American history. August 2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the adoption of the Nineteenth Amendment. And racist policies kept too many women of color from the polls for decades beyond that. As we mark this anniversary and weigh that history, MPR News with Kerri Miller is asking: What does it mean to be a woman in America today? During the month of August, we’ll explore this question and look at how women have shaped American culture, politics and power in the last century. Kerri Miller kicked off the series by talking with historian Martha S. Jones about how Black women shaped the country and had to fight their own battle for the right to vote. Guest: Martha S. Jones is a historian and writer. Her forthcoming book is “Vanguard: How Black Women Overcame Barri...

48 MIN5 d ago
Comments
What does it mean to be a woman in America today?

What the pandemic has revealed about climate change views, activism

2020 feels like a whirlwind of news and change. But even as new issues — like the coronavirus have arisen — previous problems haven’t gone away and their depths have been highlighted or exacerbated amid the pandemic. One of those issues is climate change. In the early months of the pandemic, the levels of two major air pollutants drastically dropped. And the need for fossil fuels declined as planes were grounded due to the lack of travel. But the world is trying to return to various economic and social activities as people figure out how to live with the virus, and so the green effects of the early months of quarantine are likely fleeting. In all of this, climate change activists are watching and weighing the lessons of the pandemic as they move forward. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with a meteorologist and a biologist on Tuesday at 9 a.m. about what we’re learning about climate change, education and activism in this period of transformation. Guests: Eric Holthaus is a meteo...

43 MIN6 d ago
Comments
What the pandemic has revealed about climate change views, activism

Michael Osterholm on where we are now with the COVID-19 pandemic

More than 150,000 people in the U.S. have died after being infected with COVID-19. It’s a sobering milestone that comes at a time when an increasing number of states are seeing an uptick in infections and hospitalizations. What we’re experiencing now is something Minnesota epidemiologist Michael Osterholm has likened to a “national forest fire.” During a time of surging cases, he told NPR, contact tracing and traditional testing aren’t going to go far enough to slow down the spread. MPR News host Kerri Miller talked with Osterholm about the management of the pandemic, vaccine development and the possibility of additional lockdowns. Guest: Dr. Michael Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy at the University of Minnesota.

48 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Michael Osterholm on where we are now with the COVID-19 pandemic

Minnesotans react after state releases fall guidance for schools

Gov. Tim Walz released the state’s much-awaited guidance for how schools should reopen this fall, encouraging a return to in-person classroom teaching. However, the state is leaving it up to the districts to make the call on whether to rely on in-person, online or a combination based on local health conditions. Health data and analysis will be offered to districts during the upcoming school year to help leaders, school staff and families determine if they need to alter plans. Meanwhile, the state will also pay for masks for all staff and students, along with the cost of testing. MPR News host Kerri Miller spoke with superintendents, principals and listeners about what’s in store for their schools and communities. Guests: Christine Tucci Osorio is the superintendent of North St. Paul/Maplewood/Oakdale Independent School District. Jeff Pesta is superintendent of the Deer River Independent School District. Jeannie Mayer is principal of Menahga Elementary School. Abdirizak Abdi is pri...

75 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Minnesotans react after state releases fall guidance for schools

An ER doctor shares lessons in first book, ‘The Beauty in Breaking’

Dr. Michele Harper says she doesn’t have any special powers. But for 36 hours every week, she works in a hospital emergency room and she has several jobs. She writes: “... I am called upon to be salve, antidote, and sometimes Charon. Most of the time my job is to keep death at bay. When I am successful, I send the patient back out into the world. When I’m not, I am there as life passes away.” In her first book, “The Beauty of Breaking,” Harper details what she’s learned about life, death and self-healing as a Black emergency room physician in the United States. She spoke with MPR News host Kerri Miller about the power in ‘breaking’ and what it means for growth in our lives. Guest: Dr. Michele Harper has worked as an emergency room physician for more than a decade. “The Beauty in Breaking” is her first book. To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above.Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts , Spotify...

47 MIN1 w ago
Comments
An ER doctor shares lessons in first book, ‘The Beauty in Breaking’

The impact of white evangelicals on U.S. politics

The majority of white evangelical support went to President Donald Trump in the 2016 election, and it’s a voting bloc that continues to hold the attention of campaigns and political analysts in the lead-up to the 2020 election. That support in 2016 was’t necessarily a transactional or a “lesser of two evils” choice. Rather, it’s “the culmination of evangelicals’ embrace of militant masculinity, an ideology that enshrines patriarchal authority and condones the callous display of power, at home and abroad,” according to author and history professor Kristin Kobes Du Mez in her latest book. She also writes that it’s not a change that started with Trump, nor will it end when he’s no longer in office. In “Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation,” Kobes Du Mez explores Christian manhood, the history and culture of this group and where American evangelicalism goes from here. She joined MPR News host Kerri Miller in conversation Tuesd...

--1 w ago
Comments
The impact of white evangelicals on U.S. politics

As $600 benefits nears expiration; people ask what’s next

Supplementary unemployment benefits are likely to end before Congress can pass legislation on a replacement package. House Democrats have been pushing to extend the extra $600 per week unemployment benefit, and on Monday Senate Republicans shared their plan to trim that temporary benefit to $200 per week. This news comes as unemployment claims are ratcheting back up. It’s estimated that 1 in 5 workers is collecting unemployment benefits. The spread of COVID-19 has sharpened the focus on long standing economic inequality and stagnant wages. Before the pandemic, the number of Americans working low wage jobs was close to half. Those Americans experienced the largest share of job cuts, according to an early report from the Federal Reserve. MPR News guest host and senior economics contributor Chris Farrell spoke with two economists about unemployment and the path to an economic recovery. Guests: Jared Bernstein is a senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. He previou...

--2 w ago
Comments
As $600 benefits nears expiration; people ask what’s next
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