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Latest Episodes

White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks

The Guardian In the spring of 2018, New York was gripped by a sudden, very particular and, for some, calamitous food shortage. Gaps appeared on grocery shelves. Coffee shops put out signs, turning customers away. Twitter and Instagram brimmed with outrage. The truly desperate searched from Williamsburg to Harlem, but it seemed undeniable: New York was out of oat milk. It wasn’t just New York, in fact. The entire US was suffering from a shortage of Oatly, a Swedish plant milk whose rapid rise from obscure digestive health brand to the dairy alternative of choice had caught even Oatly by surprise. Since its US launch in 2016, Oatly had gone from supplying a handful of upscale New York coffee shops to more than 3,000 cafes and grocery stores nationwide. The company had ramped up production by 1,250%, but when I spoke to CEO Toni Petersson in late summer, they were still struggling to meet demand. “How do we supply when the growth is this crazy?” Petersson said. Fortunately, when it ...

23 MIN2019 ENE. 30
Comments
White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks

How The Report Turned a 6,700-Page Torture Investigation Into a Political Thriller

For more than six years, former Senate staffer Daniel J. Jones led an investigation into the CIA’s detention and interrogation programs after 9/11, sifting through thousands of pages documenting torture, abuses of power, and the lack of accountability during the Bush administration. But when Jones talks about his experience, he doesn’t come off as a cynic about the U.S. “Over the years, you travel a lot, you talk to a lot of foreign governments, you talk to a lot of citizens,” he said Monday at the Sundance Film Festival, reflecting on a career that also included a stint as an international FBI agent. “[The United States] are a beacon, whether you want us to be or not … the building of post–World War II institutions, we’re responsible for that. In the War on Terror, we slipped.” Jones is the subject of a new film written and directed by Scott Z. Burns called The Report, which debuted at Sundance on January 26 and has already been acquired by Amazon for a reported $14 millio...

7 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
How The Report Turned a 6,700-Page Torture Investigation Into a Political Thriller

Cold War Between American and Chinese Tech Turns Hot

The most geopolitically significant technology spat in the world ratcheted up a few notches early this week. The Department of Justice unsealed two separate court cases against Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications company, which is headquartered in China. One indictment accused Huawei and the company’s CFO, Meng Wanzhou, with creating a “fraudulent financial scheme” that allowed the company to sell technology to Iran, breaking U.S. sanctions. The other newly unsealed indictment documents the 2012 theft of trade secrets from T-Mobile that took the form of designing and operating a phone-testing robot called Tappy. The current Huawei saga has all the trappings of a Cold War espionage thriller, but reengineered for our current moment. Instead of Russia, it’s China. Instead of arms, it’s mobile technology. Instead of Iran, it’s … no, it’s still Iran, actually. Americans are generally unfamiliar with Huawei because the U.S. government has tried to keep the company out ...

6 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Cold War Between American and Chinese Tech Turns Hot

THE 10 MOST INSANE MOMENTS AND STORIES FROM THE TRIAL OF DRUG LORD EL CHAPO

Vice BROOKLYN, New York — After 35 days of testimony by 56 witnesses, the trial of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is nearing a conclusion. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn rested their case Monday, and the defense followed suit on Tuesday — after calling just one witness, who was on the stand for less than half an hour. The lone defense witness was an FBI agent who was questioned about how he took notes during an interview with a Colombian drug lord who testified against El Chapo earlier in the trial. Despite some early indications that El Chapo himself might testify, he told Judge Brian Cogan on Monday that he would invoke his right to remain silent. "Señor judge, me and my attorneys have spoken about this, and I will reserve," Chapo said in the only moment he was allowed to address the court over the course of the trial. "Reserve?" Cogan asked. "Yes, I will not testify," Chapo replied. Closing arguments are now scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, and the jury could begin delibe...

15 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
THE 10 MOST INSANE MOMENTS AND STORIES FROM THE TRIAL OF DRUG LORD EL CHAPO

How police departments make millions by seizing property

Greensville.com In South Carolina, civil forfeiture targets black people’s money most of all, exclusive investigative data shows When a man barged into Isiah Kinloch’s apartment and broke a bottle over his head, the North Charleston resident called 911. After cops arrived on that day in 2015, they searched the injured man’s home and found an ounce of marijuana. So they took $1,800 in cash from his apartment and kept it. ______ When Eamon Cools-Lartigue was driving on Interstate 85 in Spartanburg County, deputies stopped him for speeding. The Atlanta businessman wasn’t criminally charged in the April 2016 incident. Deputies discovered $29,000 in his car, though, and decided to take it. ______ When Brandy Cooke dropped her friend off at a Myrtle Beach sports bar as a favor, drug enforcement agents swarmed her in the parking lot and found $4,670 in the car. Her friend was wanted in a drug distribution case, but Cooke wasn’t involved. She had no drugs and was never charged in the 2...

13 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
How police departments make millions by seizing property

Luxury fashion is booming, and it reveals a dark truth about the American middle class

Business Insider Luxury fashion is having a moment. According to a recent report from The NPD Group, dollar sales of luxury fashion in the United States have increased by 50% in recent years, with substantial growth in sales of expensive apparel and footwear. "The luxury market is evolving, new brands are getting attention, and online retailer platforms are elevating the competitive landscape," Marshal Cohen, chief industry advisor for NPD, said in a statement accompanying the report. He continued: "The younger, multi-ethnic demographic that is more attracted to purchasing designer products online — even more than the average online accessories, footwear, or apparel buyer — is a major contributor to this evolution." High-end brands such as Gucci have exploded in popularity in recent years. In the first half of 2018, its sales almost doubled. And recent survey results show that millennial and teen shoppers can't get enough of it: It was ranked the second-hottest brand on a recent s...

2 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Luxury fashion is booming, and it reveals a dark truth about the American middle class

Are you worried about robots replacing you at work?

BBC As artificial intelligence becomes both more useful and more widespread, workers everywhere are becoming anxious about how a new age of automation might affect their career prospects. A recent study by Pew Research found that in 10 advanced and emerging economies, most workers expect computers will do much of the work currently done by humans within 50 years. Workers are clearly anxious about the effects on the job market of artificial intelligence and automation. Estimates about how much of the workforce could be automated vary from about 9% to 47%. The consultancy McKinsey estimates up to 800 million workers globally could be displaced by robotic automation by 2030. Some jobs will change dramatically, while others will disappear altogether. So if automation makes the job market a little like a game of musical chairs, is there a way to make sure you’re still employed when the music stops? Can education help you robot-proof your career? Future-proofing your career is less about...

7 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Are you worried about robots replacing you at work?

When It Is Time to Sell the Family Home

The Atlantic The house in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, that Denise Portner and her husband raised their two children in was the site of dozens of celebrations—from birthday parties to Passover seders and Rosh Hashanah dinners. It was where she beat cancer. It was where her children were potty trained and where they returned to during their breaks from college. But after 15 years, it was time to go. “It was a big house, an old house,” Portner, a 56-year-old marketing-communications professional, told me. “The taxes were really high.” So, they moved to nearby Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, cutting their tax bill to a third of what it once was. “We are able to save money that we can use for travel and for saving for our kids’ needs.” Portner and her husband moved after her youngest child left for college and their large Tudor-style home was no longer the hangout hot spot it was when her kids were younger. Leaving the neighborhood was difficult, but ultimately, as is the case for many p...

8 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
When It Is Time to Sell the Family Home

Wall Street freaks out about 2020

Politico Top Wall Street executives would love to be rid of President Donald Trump. But they are getting panicked about the prospect of an ultraliberal Democratic nominee bent on raising taxes and slapping regulations on their firms. The result is a kind of nervous paralysis of executives pining for a centrist nominee like Michael Bloomberg while realizing such an outcome is unlikely from a party veering sharply to the left. Early support from deep-pocketed financial executives could give Democrats seeking to break out of the pack an important fundraising boost. But any association with bankers also opens presidential hopefuls to sharp attacks from an ascendant left. And it’s left senior executives on Wall Street flailing over what to do. “I’m a socially liberal, fiscally conservative centrist who would love to vote for a rational Democrat and get Trump out of the White House,” said the CEO of one of the nation’s largest banks, who, like a dozen other executives interviewed for...

9 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Wall Street freaks out about 2020

Bad news, Apple: Chinese smartphones are on the way up

South China Morning Post Like many urban Chinese consumers, Shenzhen civil servant Gao Jian has had a long-held belief that the quality of domestic smartphone brands paled in comparison with foreign brands, especially Apple. But in December, Gao joined the growing number of mainland consumers who have made the switch from Apple’s iPhone to a premium Android smartphone from a major Chinese brand. He bought a Mate 20 Pro, the flagship model from the country’s largest smartphone supplier Wah-way Technologies. “Its design and cameras are better than what I expected,” Gao said. “Also, iPhones have become increasingly unaffordable.” His experience reflects the broader success of the Chinese mobile phone industry in smashing people’s perception that domestic suppliers are only good for inexpensive, low-quality products. That stereotype has beset many Chinese brands in the home appliances, consumer electronics, personal computer, car and mobile phone markets, where products from more...

9 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Bad news, Apple: Chinese smartphones are on the way up

Latest Episodes

White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks

The Guardian In the spring of 2018, New York was gripped by a sudden, very particular and, for some, calamitous food shortage. Gaps appeared on grocery shelves. Coffee shops put out signs, turning customers away. Twitter and Instagram brimmed with outrage. The truly desperate searched from Williamsburg to Harlem, but it seemed undeniable: New York was out of oat milk. It wasn’t just New York, in fact. The entire US was suffering from a shortage of Oatly, a Swedish plant milk whose rapid rise from obscure digestive health brand to the dairy alternative of choice had caught even Oatly by surprise. Since its US launch in 2016, Oatly had gone from supplying a handful of upscale New York coffee shops to more than 3,000 cafes and grocery stores nationwide. The company had ramped up production by 1,250%, but when I spoke to CEO Toni Petersson in late summer, they were still struggling to meet demand. “How do we supply when the growth is this crazy?” Petersson said. Fortunately, when it ...

23 MIN2019 ENE. 30
Comments
White gold: the unstoppable rise of alternative milks

How The Report Turned a 6,700-Page Torture Investigation Into a Political Thriller

For more than six years, former Senate staffer Daniel J. Jones led an investigation into the CIA’s detention and interrogation programs after 9/11, sifting through thousands of pages documenting torture, abuses of power, and the lack of accountability during the Bush administration. But when Jones talks about his experience, he doesn’t come off as a cynic about the U.S. “Over the years, you travel a lot, you talk to a lot of foreign governments, you talk to a lot of citizens,” he said Monday at the Sundance Film Festival, reflecting on a career that also included a stint as an international FBI agent. “[The United States] are a beacon, whether you want us to be or not … the building of post–World War II institutions, we’re responsible for that. In the War on Terror, we slipped.” Jones is the subject of a new film written and directed by Scott Z. Burns called The Report, which debuted at Sundance on January 26 and has already been acquired by Amazon for a reported $14 millio...

7 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
How The Report Turned a 6,700-Page Torture Investigation Into a Political Thriller

Cold War Between American and Chinese Tech Turns Hot

The most geopolitically significant technology spat in the world ratcheted up a few notches early this week. The Department of Justice unsealed two separate court cases against Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications company, which is headquartered in China. One indictment accused Huawei and the company’s CFO, Meng Wanzhou, with creating a “fraudulent financial scheme” that allowed the company to sell technology to Iran, breaking U.S. sanctions. The other newly unsealed indictment documents the 2012 theft of trade secrets from T-Mobile that took the form of designing and operating a phone-testing robot called Tappy. The current Huawei saga has all the trappings of a Cold War espionage thriller, but reengineered for our current moment. Instead of Russia, it’s China. Instead of arms, it’s mobile technology. Instead of Iran, it’s … no, it’s still Iran, actually. Americans are generally unfamiliar with Huawei because the U.S. government has tried to keep the company out ...

6 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Cold War Between American and Chinese Tech Turns Hot

THE 10 MOST INSANE MOMENTS AND STORIES FROM THE TRIAL OF DRUG LORD EL CHAPO

Vice BROOKLYN, New York — After 35 days of testimony by 56 witnesses, the trial of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is nearing a conclusion. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn rested their case Monday, and the defense followed suit on Tuesday — after calling just one witness, who was on the stand for less than half an hour. The lone defense witness was an FBI agent who was questioned about how he took notes during an interview with a Colombian drug lord who testified against El Chapo earlier in the trial. Despite some early indications that El Chapo himself might testify, he told Judge Brian Cogan on Monday that he would invoke his right to remain silent. "Señor judge, me and my attorneys have spoken about this, and I will reserve," Chapo said in the only moment he was allowed to address the court over the course of the trial. "Reserve?" Cogan asked. "Yes, I will not testify," Chapo replied. Closing arguments are now scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, and the jury could begin delibe...

15 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
THE 10 MOST INSANE MOMENTS AND STORIES FROM THE TRIAL OF DRUG LORD EL CHAPO

How police departments make millions by seizing property

Greensville.com In South Carolina, civil forfeiture targets black people’s money most of all, exclusive investigative data shows When a man barged into Isiah Kinloch’s apartment and broke a bottle over his head, the North Charleston resident called 911. After cops arrived on that day in 2015, they searched the injured man’s home and found an ounce of marijuana. So they took $1,800 in cash from his apartment and kept it. ______ When Eamon Cools-Lartigue was driving on Interstate 85 in Spartanburg County, deputies stopped him for speeding. The Atlanta businessman wasn’t criminally charged in the April 2016 incident. Deputies discovered $29,000 in his car, though, and decided to take it. ______ When Brandy Cooke dropped her friend off at a Myrtle Beach sports bar as a favor, drug enforcement agents swarmed her in the parking lot and found $4,670 in the car. Her friend was wanted in a drug distribution case, but Cooke wasn’t involved. She had no drugs and was never charged in the 2...

13 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
How police departments make millions by seizing property

Luxury fashion is booming, and it reveals a dark truth about the American middle class

Business Insider Luxury fashion is having a moment. According to a recent report from The NPD Group, dollar sales of luxury fashion in the United States have increased by 50% in recent years, with substantial growth in sales of expensive apparel and footwear. "The luxury market is evolving, new brands are getting attention, and online retailer platforms are elevating the competitive landscape," Marshal Cohen, chief industry advisor for NPD, said in a statement accompanying the report. He continued: "The younger, multi-ethnic demographic that is more attracted to purchasing designer products online — even more than the average online accessories, footwear, or apparel buyer — is a major contributor to this evolution." High-end brands such as Gucci have exploded in popularity in recent years. In the first half of 2018, its sales almost doubled. And recent survey results show that millennial and teen shoppers can't get enough of it: It was ranked the second-hottest brand on a recent s...

2 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Luxury fashion is booming, and it reveals a dark truth about the American middle class

Are you worried about robots replacing you at work?

BBC As artificial intelligence becomes both more useful and more widespread, workers everywhere are becoming anxious about how a new age of automation might affect their career prospects. A recent study by Pew Research found that in 10 advanced and emerging economies, most workers expect computers will do much of the work currently done by humans within 50 years. Workers are clearly anxious about the effects on the job market of artificial intelligence and automation. Estimates about how much of the workforce could be automated vary from about 9% to 47%. The consultancy McKinsey estimates up to 800 million workers globally could be displaced by robotic automation by 2030. Some jobs will change dramatically, while others will disappear altogether. So if automation makes the job market a little like a game of musical chairs, is there a way to make sure you’re still employed when the music stops? Can education help you robot-proof your career? Future-proofing your career is less about...

7 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Are you worried about robots replacing you at work?

When It Is Time to Sell the Family Home

The Atlantic The house in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, that Denise Portner and her husband raised their two children in was the site of dozens of celebrations—from birthday parties to Passover seders and Rosh Hashanah dinners. It was where she beat cancer. It was where her children were potty trained and where they returned to during their breaks from college. But after 15 years, it was time to go. “It was a big house, an old house,” Portner, a 56-year-old marketing-communications professional, told me. “The taxes were really high.” So, they moved to nearby Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, cutting their tax bill to a third of what it once was. “We are able to save money that we can use for travel and for saving for our kids’ needs.” Portner and her husband moved after her youngest child left for college and their large Tudor-style home was no longer the hangout hot spot it was when her kids were younger. Leaving the neighborhood was difficult, but ultimately, as is the case for many p...

8 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
When It Is Time to Sell the Family Home

Wall Street freaks out about 2020

Politico Top Wall Street executives would love to be rid of President Donald Trump. But they are getting panicked about the prospect of an ultraliberal Democratic nominee bent on raising taxes and slapping regulations on their firms. The result is a kind of nervous paralysis of executives pining for a centrist nominee like Michael Bloomberg while realizing such an outcome is unlikely from a party veering sharply to the left. Early support from deep-pocketed financial executives could give Democrats seeking to break out of the pack an important fundraising boost. But any association with bankers also opens presidential hopefuls to sharp attacks from an ascendant left. And it’s left senior executives on Wall Street flailing over what to do. “I’m a socially liberal, fiscally conservative centrist who would love to vote for a rational Democrat and get Trump out of the White House,” said the CEO of one of the nation’s largest banks, who, like a dozen other executives interviewed for...

9 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Wall Street freaks out about 2020

Bad news, Apple: Chinese smartphones are on the way up

South China Morning Post Like many urban Chinese consumers, Shenzhen civil servant Gao Jian has had a long-held belief that the quality of domestic smartphone brands paled in comparison with foreign brands, especially Apple. But in December, Gao joined the growing number of mainland consumers who have made the switch from Apple’s iPhone to a premium Android smartphone from a major Chinese brand. He bought a Mate 20 Pro, the flagship model from the country’s largest smartphone supplier Wah-way Technologies. “Its design and cameras are better than what I expected,” Gao said. “Also, iPhones have become increasingly unaffordable.” His experience reflects the broader success of the Chinese mobile phone industry in smashing people’s perception that domestic suppliers are only good for inexpensive, low-quality products. That stereotype has beset many Chinese brands in the home appliances, consumer electronics, personal computer, car and mobile phone markets, where products from more...

9 MIN2019 ENE. 31
Comments
Bad news, Apple: Chinese smartphones are on the way up
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