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Delving into Dance

Andrew Westle

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Delving into Dance

Delving into Dance

Andrew Westle

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About Us

Delving into Dance is a podcast of conversations with dance makers and lovers, sharing interviews that are both intimate and thought provoking. Through a diversity of views, experiences and practices, we can better understand the role dance plays in individuals’ lives, while demystifying and opening dance up to new audiences. What can those who don’t regularly engage with dance learn from the artform? Delving into Dance is a passion project of researcher and dance-lover Andrew Westle. Andrew is not a dancer, instead he brings his unique perspective and passion for the art-form.

Latest Episodes

Michael J Morris

EIn this first episode we meet Michael J Morris, who was visiting Australia for the PSI conference. This wide-ranging discussion took place in a corridor at Melbourne University where we discussed ecosexuality, dance research, gender and all in between. Morris’ dance practices and interests are broad from Butoh to Burlesque, often concerned with destabilising normative gender and sexuality categories. Their experience in dance reveals there are multiple pathways to making a career in dance. As Morris explained “there are people who are fed from the experience on stage and others find it draining.” Morris’ PhD explored ecosexuality based partially on interviews with activists/artists Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle. Morris is currently an Associate Professor of Dance at Denison University, where they teach Queer, Women’s and Gender Studies. Morris has an amazing blog full of musings and writing, which you should check out; you can also follow them on twitter If you have enj...

48 MIN2016 AGO. 15
Comments
Michael J Morris

Stephanie Lake

Those familiar with Melbourne’s independent dance scene will know Stephanie Lake. A dancer and choreographer, Lake’s CV has a long list of credits including Chunky Move and Lucy Guerin Inc. She started dance reasonably late for a woman, and forged a career through her unique physical style. Lake said: “My hair would never go neatly into a bun … I didn’t know any of the ballet language… I think that it can actually be a positive, because you want individual voices in the arts.” Lake continues to push expectations of the form and is known for physically demanding choreography. She was awarded the Australian Dance Award in 2014 for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography, and the Helpmann Award for Best Choreography in Dance or Physical Theatre Work 2014 for A Small Prometheus. Mix Tape (2010) received the Green Room award for Best Choreography. Her work has toured to Germany, France, Ireland, Denmark, Singapore and Australia with a range of work including : Mix Tape; AORTA; Dua...

34 MIN2016 AGO. 30
Comments
Stephanie Lake

Deborah Jowitt

Deborah Jowitt is one of the most accessible dance critics, spending her life capturing the diversity of dance in her reviews, particularly in New York City. Jowitt’s work focuses equally on ballet and modern dance with a love for both styles. I believe Jowitt’s experience as a dancer and choreographer helps in her translation of what is seen in the theatre to what is seen on the page. Jowitt wrote for the Village Voice between 1967 and 2011, has written for The New York Times, Dance Research Journal, and Ballet Review among others. Her reviews form a powerful set of literature, with a sense of poetry and movement that is captured in her writing. Jowitt continues to review for the pure love and joy of the practice of criticism. Her work can be found here. Jowitt has written a series of four books, with her latest which focuses on the life and work of Jerome Robbins; Jerome Robbins: His Life, His Theater, His Dance published in August of 2004 by Simon and Schuster. In the interview...

33 MIN2016 SEP. 13
Comments
Deborah Jowitt

Rafael Bonachela

Rafael Bonachela moved to Australia in 2009 to be the Artistic Director at Sydney Dance Company. He followed Graeme Murphy, who had been at the helm for decades, and took up the role after the tragic death of Tanja Liedtke, who was named as Murphy’s successor. Since his appointment, Rafael has brought the works of a diverse range of leading choreographers to Australia including Alexander Ekman, Adam Linder, William Forsythe, Jacopo Godani and Kenneth Kvarnstrom. While programing the works of Australian choreographers including Larissa McGowan, Stephanie Lake and Gideon Obarzanek. Rafael works with a range of collaborators including with Toni Maticevski, Sarah Blasko, Nick Wales and Katie Noonan. His works includeg 360° C (2008), We Unfold (2009), 6 Breaths (2010), Shared Frequencies (2011), 2 One Another (2012), Les Illuminations (2013), and Lux Tenebris (2016). Rafael has helped instigate a Pre-Professional Year for early-career dancers, as well as focusing on school students to ...

44 MIN2016 NOV. 11
Comments
Rafael Bonachela

Gideon Obarzanek

Gideon Obarzanek is best known for establishing Chunky Move in 1995 in Sydney, subsequently moving to Melbourne in 1997 after winning a tender from the Kennett State Government. Obarzanek hoped that Chunky Move would last at least a year in Melbourne, “so it wouldn’t be so embarrassing”. His desire was to create a space for dancers and choreographers to apply for funding and make work at a time when independent dance was very fringe. “I didn’t have a great interest in having a dance company or directing a dance company, it came out of necessity. […] My interest has always been about making work.” Obarzanek remained the artistic director of Chunky Move until 2012. Obarzanek’s work is diverse, with a focus on collaborations, technology, large-scale events, film and site specific works. His work has toured Europe, Asia, U.K., USA and South America. He has been presented at the Joyce Theatre, BAM Next Wave Festival NY, Dance Theatre Workshop, Venice Biennale, Territoria Festival...

46 MIN2016 DIC. 6
Comments
Gideon Obarzanek

Alexandre Hamel

Alexandre Hamel established the world’s first contemporary ice-skating collective, Montreal-based Le Patin Libre, in 2005. Attracting rebel skaters that turn their back on the world of figure skating or more conventional opportunities for skate performance, Le Patin Libre seeks to reinvent what is possible on ice. Using the skates to create brand new movements which are explained as “grounded flight”, the gliding motion as well as the sound of the skates opens new possibilities for movement and dance. But can Le Patin Libre be described as a dance company? It is Hamel’s view that: “Branding it as contemporary dance is bad for marketing. Contemporary dance is often seen as elitist, boring […] for snobs by a very large section of the public.” This is a company that defies traditional categories. Conventions do not dictate Le Patin Libre, who have established and fostered their own audiences and styles of movements. They explain their work as contemporary skating. The sound of t...

38 MIN2016 DIC. 20
Comments
Alexandre Hamel

Anouk van Dijk

In this first episode of season two, we get acquainted with Anouk van Dijk, the Artistic Director of Melbourne based Chunky Move. Anouk originates from Holland, where she started to seriously pursue dance in her late teens, after watching a dancer called Ian- a man she has never met or seen since. Watching Ian move across the space was captivating: “I will never forget…Ian filled the room. He filled the room with energy, with his passion, with his power. That was it. I was sold […] I wanted to be a dancer”. As a dancer, Anouk danced for Werkcentrum Dans, the Nieuwe Dansgroep, the Rotterdance Dance Company and Amanda Miller’s Pretty Ugly Dance Company. In 1998, Anouk formed her own company, anoukvandijk dc, based in Amsterdam. The company toured extensively including performing at Festival d’Avignon, MASS MoCA, Dance Triennale Tokyo, American Dance Festival and Festival TransAmériques. It also toured to Australia, performing at Adelaide Festival, Sydney Opera House and Perth I...

50 MIN2017 MAR. 7
Comments
Anouk van Dijk

Lucy Guerin

Lucy Guerin is one of the powerhouses of Australian Contemporary dance, known for her work in Australia and abroad. An Adelaide native, Lucy fell in love with contemporary dance and pursued this love to New York in 1989, dancing there for seven years. During this time, she worked with leading dance mentors including Bebe Miller, Tere O’Connor and Sara Rudner. In 2002, Lucy Guerin Inc was established in Melbourne, providing a space for exploring and expanding upon ideas about contemporary dance. Through its noted Pieces for Small Spaces & First Run programs, the company have provided a platform for emerging choreographers to experiment and explore choreographic approaches. Lucy has increasingly been working across forms, working in the UK with Carrie Cracknell first on Medea (2014) and then Macbeth (2015). Following the success of Macbeth, Lucy was commissioned by Rambert to make the work Tomorrow. “I like working with the dancers, I like working on the detail of the choreography a...

38 MIN2017 MAR. 21
Comments
Lucy Guerin

Daniel Jaber

Daniel Jaber started ballet when he was aged four, when he attended dance classes with his sister. He recounts seeing In The Middle, Somewhat Elevated, a work by William Forsythe, as a child and it was in this moment that he knew he wanted to become a professional dancer. At 15, Daniel started studying at Queensland University of Technology, obsessed with movement and dance: “Movement gave me a greater sense of freedom and expression.” Daniel recounts Australian Dance Theatre (ADT) work Bird Brain and being blown away by the performance of Tanja Liedtke. He loved the work of ADT’s artistic director Garry Stewart due to his ballistic choreography and “savage use of classicism”. In 2003, Daniel started working full time for ADT. He ended up dancing Liedtke part: “I still consider that one of my life’s blessings.” Daniel has danced throughout Australia, Asia, US, Europe and the UK. He has worked with Phillip Adams BalletLab, Joachim Schloemer, Frances d’Ath, Philip Fabre, Clin...

46 MIN2017 ABR. 4
Comments
Daniel Jaber

Noel Tovey

EI first came across the incredible Noel Tovey in 2009 a friend and I saw Little Black Bastard, his solo show. It was such a brave performance and Noel exuded such grace and humility. But what we were blown away by was his story of survival. His life started in neglect and poverty, he endured frightening amounts of sexual abuse and now had an incredibly successful career as a dancer, choreographer, actor and director. Noel Tovey’s life has been utterly extraordinary. Living as a street kid and rent boy in Melbourne during the 1940 and 50s, he was sent to Pentridge Gaol in 1951, when he was 17, after pleading not guilty to the crime of buggery. It was only in 2016 that the Victoria State Government apologised to men like Noel, men who were incarcerated and persecuted as a result of unjust laws that marked homosexuality as criminal. Noel was an important advocate in the campaign that lead to the apology, and he was present for the apology. Noel’s interest and passion in the performin...

47 MIN2017 ABR. 18
Comments
Noel Tovey

Latest Episodes

Michael J Morris

EIn this first episode we meet Michael J Morris, who was visiting Australia for the PSI conference. This wide-ranging discussion took place in a corridor at Melbourne University where we discussed ecosexuality, dance research, gender and all in between. Morris’ dance practices and interests are broad from Butoh to Burlesque, often concerned with destabilising normative gender and sexuality categories. Their experience in dance reveals there are multiple pathways to making a career in dance. As Morris explained “there are people who are fed from the experience on stage and others find it draining.” Morris’ PhD explored ecosexuality based partially on interviews with activists/artists Elizabeth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle. Morris is currently an Associate Professor of Dance at Denison University, where they teach Queer, Women’s and Gender Studies. Morris has an amazing blog full of musings and writing, which you should check out; you can also follow them on twitter If you have enj...

48 MIN2016 AGO. 15
Comments
Michael J Morris

Stephanie Lake

Those familiar with Melbourne’s independent dance scene will know Stephanie Lake. A dancer and choreographer, Lake’s CV has a long list of credits including Chunky Move and Lucy Guerin Inc. She started dance reasonably late for a woman, and forged a career through her unique physical style. Lake said: “My hair would never go neatly into a bun … I didn’t know any of the ballet language… I think that it can actually be a positive, because you want individual voices in the arts.” Lake continues to push expectations of the form and is known for physically demanding choreography. She was awarded the Australian Dance Award in 2014 for Outstanding Achievement in Choreography, and the Helpmann Award for Best Choreography in Dance or Physical Theatre Work 2014 for A Small Prometheus. Mix Tape (2010) received the Green Room award for Best Choreography. Her work has toured to Germany, France, Ireland, Denmark, Singapore and Australia with a range of work including : Mix Tape; AORTA; Dua...

34 MIN2016 AGO. 30
Comments
Stephanie Lake

Deborah Jowitt

Deborah Jowitt is one of the most accessible dance critics, spending her life capturing the diversity of dance in her reviews, particularly in New York City. Jowitt’s work focuses equally on ballet and modern dance with a love for both styles. I believe Jowitt’s experience as a dancer and choreographer helps in her translation of what is seen in the theatre to what is seen on the page. Jowitt wrote for the Village Voice between 1967 and 2011, has written for The New York Times, Dance Research Journal, and Ballet Review among others. Her reviews form a powerful set of literature, with a sense of poetry and movement that is captured in her writing. Jowitt continues to review for the pure love and joy of the practice of criticism. Her work can be found here. Jowitt has written a series of four books, with her latest which focuses on the life and work of Jerome Robbins; Jerome Robbins: His Life, His Theater, His Dance published in August of 2004 by Simon and Schuster. In the interview...

33 MIN2016 SEP. 13
Comments
Deborah Jowitt

Rafael Bonachela

Rafael Bonachela moved to Australia in 2009 to be the Artistic Director at Sydney Dance Company. He followed Graeme Murphy, who had been at the helm for decades, and took up the role after the tragic death of Tanja Liedtke, who was named as Murphy’s successor. Since his appointment, Rafael has brought the works of a diverse range of leading choreographers to Australia including Alexander Ekman, Adam Linder, William Forsythe, Jacopo Godani and Kenneth Kvarnstrom. While programing the works of Australian choreographers including Larissa McGowan, Stephanie Lake and Gideon Obarzanek. Rafael works with a range of collaborators including with Toni Maticevski, Sarah Blasko, Nick Wales and Katie Noonan. His works includeg 360° C (2008), We Unfold (2009), 6 Breaths (2010), Shared Frequencies (2011), 2 One Another (2012), Les Illuminations (2013), and Lux Tenebris (2016). Rafael has helped instigate a Pre-Professional Year for early-career dancers, as well as focusing on school students to ...

44 MIN2016 NOV. 11
Comments
Rafael Bonachela

Gideon Obarzanek

Gideon Obarzanek is best known for establishing Chunky Move in 1995 in Sydney, subsequently moving to Melbourne in 1997 after winning a tender from the Kennett State Government. Obarzanek hoped that Chunky Move would last at least a year in Melbourne, “so it wouldn’t be so embarrassing”. His desire was to create a space for dancers and choreographers to apply for funding and make work at a time when independent dance was very fringe. “I didn’t have a great interest in having a dance company or directing a dance company, it came out of necessity. […] My interest has always been about making work.” Obarzanek remained the artistic director of Chunky Move until 2012. Obarzanek’s work is diverse, with a focus on collaborations, technology, large-scale events, film and site specific works. His work has toured Europe, Asia, U.K., USA and South America. He has been presented at the Joyce Theatre, BAM Next Wave Festival NY, Dance Theatre Workshop, Venice Biennale, Territoria Festival...

46 MIN2016 DIC. 6
Comments
Gideon Obarzanek

Alexandre Hamel

Alexandre Hamel established the world’s first contemporary ice-skating collective, Montreal-based Le Patin Libre, in 2005. Attracting rebel skaters that turn their back on the world of figure skating or more conventional opportunities for skate performance, Le Patin Libre seeks to reinvent what is possible on ice. Using the skates to create brand new movements which are explained as “grounded flight”, the gliding motion as well as the sound of the skates opens new possibilities for movement and dance. But can Le Patin Libre be described as a dance company? It is Hamel’s view that: “Branding it as contemporary dance is bad for marketing. Contemporary dance is often seen as elitist, boring […] for snobs by a very large section of the public.” This is a company that defies traditional categories. Conventions do not dictate Le Patin Libre, who have established and fostered their own audiences and styles of movements. They explain their work as contemporary skating. The sound of t...

38 MIN2016 DIC. 20
Comments
Alexandre Hamel

Anouk van Dijk

In this first episode of season two, we get acquainted with Anouk van Dijk, the Artistic Director of Melbourne based Chunky Move. Anouk originates from Holland, where she started to seriously pursue dance in her late teens, after watching a dancer called Ian- a man she has never met or seen since. Watching Ian move across the space was captivating: “I will never forget…Ian filled the room. He filled the room with energy, with his passion, with his power. That was it. I was sold […] I wanted to be a dancer”. As a dancer, Anouk danced for Werkcentrum Dans, the Nieuwe Dansgroep, the Rotterdance Dance Company and Amanda Miller’s Pretty Ugly Dance Company. In 1998, Anouk formed her own company, anoukvandijk dc, based in Amsterdam. The company toured extensively including performing at Festival d’Avignon, MASS MoCA, Dance Triennale Tokyo, American Dance Festival and Festival TransAmériques. It also toured to Australia, performing at Adelaide Festival, Sydney Opera House and Perth I...

50 MIN2017 MAR. 7
Comments
Anouk van Dijk

Lucy Guerin

Lucy Guerin is one of the powerhouses of Australian Contemporary dance, known for her work in Australia and abroad. An Adelaide native, Lucy fell in love with contemporary dance and pursued this love to New York in 1989, dancing there for seven years. During this time, she worked with leading dance mentors including Bebe Miller, Tere O’Connor and Sara Rudner. In 2002, Lucy Guerin Inc was established in Melbourne, providing a space for exploring and expanding upon ideas about contemporary dance. Through its noted Pieces for Small Spaces & First Run programs, the company have provided a platform for emerging choreographers to experiment and explore choreographic approaches. Lucy has increasingly been working across forms, working in the UK with Carrie Cracknell first on Medea (2014) and then Macbeth (2015). Following the success of Macbeth, Lucy was commissioned by Rambert to make the work Tomorrow. “I like working with the dancers, I like working on the detail of the choreography a...

38 MIN2017 MAR. 21
Comments
Lucy Guerin

Daniel Jaber

Daniel Jaber started ballet when he was aged four, when he attended dance classes with his sister. He recounts seeing In The Middle, Somewhat Elevated, a work by William Forsythe, as a child and it was in this moment that he knew he wanted to become a professional dancer. At 15, Daniel started studying at Queensland University of Technology, obsessed with movement and dance: “Movement gave me a greater sense of freedom and expression.” Daniel recounts Australian Dance Theatre (ADT) work Bird Brain and being blown away by the performance of Tanja Liedtke. He loved the work of ADT’s artistic director Garry Stewart due to his ballistic choreography and “savage use of classicism”. In 2003, Daniel started working full time for ADT. He ended up dancing Liedtke part: “I still consider that one of my life’s blessings.” Daniel has danced throughout Australia, Asia, US, Europe and the UK. He has worked with Phillip Adams BalletLab, Joachim Schloemer, Frances d’Ath, Philip Fabre, Clin...

46 MIN2017 ABR. 4
Comments
Daniel Jaber

Noel Tovey

EI first came across the incredible Noel Tovey in 2009 a friend and I saw Little Black Bastard, his solo show. It was such a brave performance and Noel exuded such grace and humility. But what we were blown away by was his story of survival. His life started in neglect and poverty, he endured frightening amounts of sexual abuse and now had an incredibly successful career as a dancer, choreographer, actor and director. Noel Tovey’s life has been utterly extraordinary. Living as a street kid and rent boy in Melbourne during the 1940 and 50s, he was sent to Pentridge Gaol in 1951, when he was 17, after pleading not guilty to the crime of buggery. It was only in 2016 that the Victoria State Government apologised to men like Noel, men who were incarcerated and persecuted as a result of unjust laws that marked homosexuality as criminal. Noel was an important advocate in the campaign that lead to the apology, and he was present for the apology. Noel’s interest and passion in the performin...

47 MIN2017 ABR. 18
Comments
Noel Tovey
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