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Soundcheck

WNYC Studios

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Soundcheck

Soundcheck

WNYC Studios

38
Followers
30
Plays
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Live performances and conversations in which artists talk about their work, their process, and themselves. Genre-blind but open-eared. Hosted by John Schaefer.

Latest Episodes

Oldies of the Future (From the Archives)

In recent years, oldies radio stations have inched further into the future - and have begun to focus on favorites from the '70s (and even '80s) rather than from the '50s and '60s. So we wondered, forty years from now - in 2052 - will songs of the '90s, '00s and '10s make it onto oldies radio? What will be in heavy rotation - and what will be left off of the playlist?We askChris Molanphy- author of the "100 & Single" Billboard charts column in the Village Voice – andwe talk withScott Shannon - who was, back in 2012, aWPLJ host and creator of the syndicated radio network The True Oldies Channel - about the state of oldies today. Check out Chris Molanphy's playlist (chronological listing): Twenty songs we’ll still be hearing on oldies radio in 2052 by Chris Molanphy (In chronological order by original release) 1. Sir Mix-a-Lot, “Baby Got Back” (1992) – This hit was underestimated by critics in ’92, compared with Arrested Development’s “Tennessee” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 2. Pearl Jam, “Yellow Ledbetter” (1992) – An example of how classic-rock acts are eventually remembered for a song that wasn’t their biggest radio hit. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 97) 3. Radiohead, “Creep” (1993) – Still their U.S. biggest hit, and though they’ve recorded greater albums this is still most likely to be in rotation decades from now. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 34) 4. Snoop (Doggy) Dogg, “Gin and Juice” (1994) – Because a great line is a great line, and “With my mind on my money and my money on my mind” is a great one. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 8) 5. Mariah Carey, “Always Be My Baby” (1996) – She was the biggest pop star of the ’90s, but a lot of her hits got burned out long ago; this one hasn’t. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 6. Sublime, “What I Got” (1996) – Because bros and stoners, like it or not, are going to have a new “The Joker”/”Slow Ride.” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A—Airplay chart peak No. 29) 7. Blur, “Song 2” (1997) – Sports will still be the way we hear a lot of pop songs. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A—Airplay chart peak No. 55) 8. Backstreet Boys, “I Want It That Way” (1999) – Great song; but also the Chinese brothers’ lip-dub (2005) was one of YouTube’s first viral videos—the future of hits. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 6) 9. Eminem, “Lose Yourself” (2002) – He won an Oscar for it, essentially because it’s this generation’s “Gonna Fly Now”/“Eye of the Tiger.” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 10. Coldplay, “Clocks” (2002) – Every generation has its easy-listening songs. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 29) 11. The White Stripes, “Seven Nation Army” (2003) – Because you can’t stop a good bassline, even when it’s actually played on a guitar. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 76) 12. The Postal Service, “Such Great Heights” or Yeah Yeah Yeahs, “Maps” (2003) – One of these will be the “Just Like Heaven” of our era—the hipster love song. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A, No. 87) 13. OutKast, “Hey Ya!” (2003) – Burned out in its heyday but will probably never die. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 14. Kelly Clarkson, “Since U Been Gone” (2005) – It will be the Millennial generation’s “sass anthem,” akin to “Respect” or “I Will Survive” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 2) 15. Gnarls Barkley, “Crazy” (2006) – Because of its malleability as a song; decades hence it might be a folk classic. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 2) 16. Rihanna, “Umbrella” (2007) – It’s the lyrics: beneath its hip-hop exterior lie the bones of an old-time, sentimental love ballad. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 17. Beyoncé, “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” (2008) – Weddings alone guarantee this a permanent hit-parade spot. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 18. Jay-Z, “Empire State of Mind” (2009) – Rap’s Frank Sinatra ensured himself decades of royalties with his own Yankee-game-worthy perennial. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 19. Lady Gaga, “Bad Romance” (2009) – Its nonsense ly

23 MINjust now
Comments
Oldies of the Future (From the Archives)

Cuban Pianist Roberto Fonseca Presents Music From His Latest Record

Grammy-nominatedCuban pianist Roberto Fonsecapresents an infusion ofrap, funk, reggaeton and electronic music, performing songs from his latest recordin studio.Yesunis the Havana-born artist’s ninth solo album, it explores the music of his homeland,and incorporates electronic beats, spoken word, and retro-modern keyboards. "[It's] the album I’ve always wanted to make, all my influences are here. All the sounds and vibes that make me who I am.” - Rosa Gollan Watch the session here:

30 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Cuban Pianist Roberto Fonseca Presents Music From His Latest Record

Bartees Strange presents his heartfelt homage to The National, In Studio

Oklahoma-raised, Brooklyn- and DC-based artist Bartees Strange presentshis re-imaginings of songs by The National in studio. Botha heartfelt homage and a political act of critique, he takesinspiration from the music, the lyrics, and even the cover art to examinehow black artists can find room in white spaces. The idea for his debut EP,Say Goodbye to Pretty Boy (out March 13), started when Strange attended a concert of The National in 2019and he was surprisedby how few blackpeople were there to watch, and he asked himself the questions: "Why was it so rare to see black people at shows like these, to see black musicians freed from reductive definitions of genre, to see black acts with this level of success in a genre that is deeply informed by legacies of black music inAmerica?" So he focused his attention on reinterpreting and translating their songs through a personal lens,acknowledgingthe possibilities and contradictions within the genre. Read more at Bandcamp. Set List: About Toda...

29 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Bartees Strange presents his heartfelt homage to The National, In Studio

Montreal Cellist Rebecca Foon Lifts Her Voice in Concern

Rebecca Foon, the cellist, producer, composer and climate activist, is a central part of the Montreal new music scene. She's a former member ofThee Silver Mt. Zion,co-founded theprogressive chamber band Esmerine, and created albums of cello and electronic soundscapes under the name Saltland. But her new album features a lot more piano, other instruments, and the the quiet kick of her own cello-like voice. The album’s called Waxing Moon, and it’s come out under Rebecca Foon’s own name. Cellist and pianist Rebecca Foon performs some of this new material, in-studio. Watch the session here:

37 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Montreal Cellist Rebecca Foon Lifts Her Voice in Concern

The Dark Drone of Dublin Folk Miscreants Lankum, In-Studio

The quartet of “Dublin folk miscreants” called Lankum reworks traditional folk songs so that they are infused with an “urban punk” vibe as well as some psychedelic drone. Made of brothers Ian Lynch (uillean pipes, tin whistle, vocals), Daragh Lynch (vocals, guitar) alongside Cormac Mac Diarmada (fiddle) and Radie Peat (harmonium, accordion, vocals), the band deconstructs and reassembles traditional Irish songs, allowing them to grow and breathe, yet bathing them in a dark and raw energy. Lankum’s press makes no bones about their wide-ranging interests in Krautrock to drone to ambient to Brian Eno, and describes them as “born of years criss-crossing the folk, squat and experimental scenes. The band plays some of their distinct drone-folk, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Set list: "Katie Cruel," "Bear Creek,""Rocky Road to Dublin" Stream this Web Extra, "Rocky Road to Dublin" from Lankum: Here's a video of their song, "The Young People":

36 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Dark Drone of Dublin Folk Miscreants Lankum, In-Studio

The World/Inferno Friendship Society Pushes on Limits of Punk

The Brooklyn-based collective The World/Inferno Friendship Societyis a righteous gumbo of dark cabaret, which might touch on punk, ska, blues, rockenroll, klezmer, gospel, and jazz. With catchy tunes, and pizzazz-filled energy, World/Inferno pushes the limits of what could possibly be perceived as punk rock.Their brand-new record is hot off the presses, All Borders Are Porous To Cats, and it brings the band to make some mischief, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the live session here:

23 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The World/Inferno Friendship Society Pushes on Limits of Punk

Katie Gately's Spectral Electronic Songs, In-Studio

In her music, singer and producer Katie Gately delivers spectral singing, layers of electronics, and an array of unusual sampled sounds for an effect that is unsettling, yet somehow inviting. Her latest record,Loom, was createdin reaction to her late mother's illness, and is a lovely and challenging soundworld into which she poured her heart. Katie Gately performs some of these songs, in-studio. Watch the session here:

36 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Katie Gately's Spectral Electronic Songs, In-Studio

Jack Penate Seeks To Inspire, Comfort With 'After You'

British singer-songwriter Jack Penate gets spiritual with soul and mysticism, and throws down raw emotion with pop polish. He reflectsabout his decade of hiatus and cites his inspirations: Turkish and Iranian psychedelic music as well as the influence of powerful classic gospel by the ChicagoPastor T. L.Barrettand his youth-focused ministry. Also, he talks about scouting the dramatic cliffs, stone quarry, and cave in Dorset as part of the video shoot for "Murder," and poetry by his grandfather, Mervyn Peake. Jack Penateplays stripped-down arrangements of songs from his latest record,in-studio. - Caryn Havlik

27 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Jack Penate Seeks To Inspire, Comfort With 'After You'

Modern Malian Singer Fatoumata Diawara Respects Her Roots

Malian singer-songwriter, guitarist, and actorFatoumata Diawarais amultiple Grammy Award nominee, currently living in Paris."Fatou"Diawarahas become an enthusiastic collaborator - with musicians from other African countries - Cheikh Lô, AfroCubism, and Orchestra Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - as well as rock stars like Damon Albarn and Flea and traditional players from Cuba and Brittany. She has also worked as a social activist, campaigning against the trafficking and sale of black migrants in Libyan slave markets. On her most recent, Fenfo (“Something to Say”), electric guitarriffs combine with the strings of the kora and kamel ngoni and drum kit combines with the timeless rhythms of traditional percussion. The record was co-produced by French auteur Matthieu Chedid aka M, who plays guitar and organ, and the versatile cellist Vincent Segal is a guest on a few tracks. Fatoumata Diawarasharesthe fruits of her latest musicaladventures, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the session here:

30 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Modern Malian Singer Fatoumata Diawara Respects Her Roots

Filmic Down-Tuned Piano Music By Dutch Composer Joep Beving

Dutch pianist and composer Joep Beving records for the world’s most prestigious classical music label,but his streaming numbers are more like a pop star. Hecreatesintrospective and often filmic instrumental piano compositions,representing a quest for essence and beauty.Beving plays one piece from each of his mostly solo piano records on adown-tuned piano (A=432), in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the session here:

35 MINFEB. 29
Comments
Filmic Down-Tuned Piano Music By Dutch Composer Joep Beving

Latest Episodes

Oldies of the Future (From the Archives)

In recent years, oldies radio stations have inched further into the future - and have begun to focus on favorites from the '70s (and even '80s) rather than from the '50s and '60s. So we wondered, forty years from now - in 2052 - will songs of the '90s, '00s and '10s make it onto oldies radio? What will be in heavy rotation - and what will be left off of the playlist?We askChris Molanphy- author of the "100 & Single" Billboard charts column in the Village Voice – andwe talk withScott Shannon - who was, back in 2012, aWPLJ host and creator of the syndicated radio network The True Oldies Channel - about the state of oldies today. Check out Chris Molanphy's playlist (chronological listing): Twenty songs we’ll still be hearing on oldies radio in 2052 by Chris Molanphy (In chronological order by original release) 1. Sir Mix-a-Lot, “Baby Got Back” (1992) – This hit was underestimated by critics in ’92, compared with Arrested Development’s “Tennessee” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 2. Pearl Jam, “Yellow Ledbetter” (1992) – An example of how classic-rock acts are eventually remembered for a song that wasn’t their biggest radio hit. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 97) 3. Radiohead, “Creep” (1993) – Still their U.S. biggest hit, and though they’ve recorded greater albums this is still most likely to be in rotation decades from now. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 34) 4. Snoop (Doggy) Dogg, “Gin and Juice” (1994) – Because a great line is a great line, and “With my mind on my money and my money on my mind” is a great one. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 8) 5. Mariah Carey, “Always Be My Baby” (1996) – She was the biggest pop star of the ’90s, but a lot of her hits got burned out long ago; this one hasn’t. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 6. Sublime, “What I Got” (1996) – Because bros and stoners, like it or not, are going to have a new “The Joker”/”Slow Ride.” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A—Airplay chart peak No. 29) 7. Blur, “Song 2” (1997) – Sports will still be the way we hear a lot of pop songs. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A—Airplay chart peak No. 55) 8. Backstreet Boys, “I Want It That Way” (1999) – Great song; but also the Chinese brothers’ lip-dub (2005) was one of YouTube’s first viral videos—the future of hits. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 6) 9. Eminem, “Lose Yourself” (2002) – He won an Oscar for it, essentially because it’s this generation’s “Gonna Fly Now”/“Eye of the Tiger.” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 10. Coldplay, “Clocks” (2002) – Every generation has its easy-listening songs. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 29) 11. The White Stripes, “Seven Nation Army” (2003) – Because you can’t stop a good bassline, even when it’s actually played on a guitar. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 76) 12. The Postal Service, “Such Great Heights” or Yeah Yeah Yeahs, “Maps” (2003) – One of these will be the “Just Like Heaven” of our era—the hipster love song. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: N/A, No. 87) 13. OutKast, “Hey Ya!” (2003) – Burned out in its heyday but will probably never die. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 14. Kelly Clarkson, “Since U Been Gone” (2005) – It will be the Millennial generation’s “sass anthem,” akin to “Respect” or “I Will Survive” (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 2) 15. Gnarls Barkley, “Crazy” (2006) – Because of its malleability as a song; decades hence it might be a folk classic. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 2) 16. Rihanna, “Umbrella” (2007) – It’s the lyrics: beneath its hip-hop exterior lie the bones of an old-time, sentimental love ballad. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 17. Beyoncé, “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” (2008) – Weddings alone guarantee this a permanent hit-parade spot. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 18. Jay-Z, “Empire State of Mind” (2009) – Rap’s Frank Sinatra ensured himself decades of royalties with his own Yankee-game-worthy perennial. (Peak on Billboard’s Hot 100: No. 1) 19. Lady Gaga, “Bad Romance” (2009) – Its nonsense ly

23 MINjust now
Comments
Oldies of the Future (From the Archives)

Cuban Pianist Roberto Fonseca Presents Music From His Latest Record

Grammy-nominatedCuban pianist Roberto Fonsecapresents an infusion ofrap, funk, reggaeton and electronic music, performing songs from his latest recordin studio.Yesunis the Havana-born artist’s ninth solo album, it explores the music of his homeland,and incorporates electronic beats, spoken word, and retro-modern keyboards. "[It's] the album I’ve always wanted to make, all my influences are here. All the sounds and vibes that make me who I am.” - Rosa Gollan Watch the session here:

30 MIN3 d ago
Comments
Cuban Pianist Roberto Fonseca Presents Music From His Latest Record

Bartees Strange presents his heartfelt homage to The National, In Studio

Oklahoma-raised, Brooklyn- and DC-based artist Bartees Strange presentshis re-imaginings of songs by The National in studio. Botha heartfelt homage and a political act of critique, he takesinspiration from the music, the lyrics, and even the cover art to examinehow black artists can find room in white spaces. The idea for his debut EP,Say Goodbye to Pretty Boy (out March 13), started when Strange attended a concert of The National in 2019and he was surprisedby how few blackpeople were there to watch, and he asked himself the questions: "Why was it so rare to see black people at shows like these, to see black musicians freed from reductive definitions of genre, to see black acts with this level of success in a genre that is deeply informed by legacies of black music inAmerica?" So he focused his attention on reinterpreting and translating their songs through a personal lens,acknowledgingthe possibilities and contradictions within the genre. Read more at Bandcamp. Set List: About Toda...

29 MIN6 d ago
Comments
Bartees Strange presents his heartfelt homage to The National, In Studio

Montreal Cellist Rebecca Foon Lifts Her Voice in Concern

Rebecca Foon, the cellist, producer, composer and climate activist, is a central part of the Montreal new music scene. She's a former member ofThee Silver Mt. Zion,co-founded theprogressive chamber band Esmerine, and created albums of cello and electronic soundscapes under the name Saltland. But her new album features a lot more piano, other instruments, and the the quiet kick of her own cello-like voice. The album’s called Waxing Moon, and it’s come out under Rebecca Foon’s own name. Cellist and pianist Rebecca Foon performs some of this new material, in-studio. Watch the session here:

37 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Montreal Cellist Rebecca Foon Lifts Her Voice in Concern

The Dark Drone of Dublin Folk Miscreants Lankum, In-Studio

The quartet of “Dublin folk miscreants” called Lankum reworks traditional folk songs so that they are infused with an “urban punk” vibe as well as some psychedelic drone. Made of brothers Ian Lynch (uillean pipes, tin whistle, vocals), Daragh Lynch (vocals, guitar) alongside Cormac Mac Diarmada (fiddle) and Radie Peat (harmonium, accordion, vocals), the band deconstructs and reassembles traditional Irish songs, allowing them to grow and breathe, yet bathing them in a dark and raw energy. Lankum’s press makes no bones about their wide-ranging interests in Krautrock to drone to ambient to Brian Eno, and describes them as “born of years criss-crossing the folk, squat and experimental scenes. The band plays some of their distinct drone-folk, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Set list: "Katie Cruel," "Bear Creek,""Rocky Road to Dublin" Stream this Web Extra, "Rocky Road to Dublin" from Lankum: Here's a video of their song, "The Young People":

36 MIN1 w ago
Comments
The Dark Drone of Dublin Folk Miscreants Lankum, In-Studio

The World/Inferno Friendship Society Pushes on Limits of Punk

The Brooklyn-based collective The World/Inferno Friendship Societyis a righteous gumbo of dark cabaret, which might touch on punk, ska, blues, rockenroll, klezmer, gospel, and jazz. With catchy tunes, and pizzazz-filled energy, World/Inferno pushes the limits of what could possibly be perceived as punk rock.Their brand-new record is hot off the presses, All Borders Are Porous To Cats, and it brings the band to make some mischief, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the live session here:

23 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The World/Inferno Friendship Society Pushes on Limits of Punk

Katie Gately's Spectral Electronic Songs, In-Studio

In her music, singer and producer Katie Gately delivers spectral singing, layers of electronics, and an array of unusual sampled sounds for an effect that is unsettling, yet somehow inviting. Her latest record,Loom, was createdin reaction to her late mother's illness, and is a lovely and challenging soundworld into which she poured her heart. Katie Gately performs some of these songs, in-studio. Watch the session here:

36 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Katie Gately's Spectral Electronic Songs, In-Studio

Jack Penate Seeks To Inspire, Comfort With 'After You'

British singer-songwriter Jack Penate gets spiritual with soul and mysticism, and throws down raw emotion with pop polish. He reflectsabout his decade of hiatus and cites his inspirations: Turkish and Iranian psychedelic music as well as the influence of powerful classic gospel by the ChicagoPastor T. L.Barrettand his youth-focused ministry. Also, he talks about scouting the dramatic cliffs, stone quarry, and cave in Dorset as part of the video shoot for "Murder," and poetry by his grandfather, Mervyn Peake. Jack Penateplays stripped-down arrangements of songs from his latest record,in-studio. - Caryn Havlik

27 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Jack Penate Seeks To Inspire, Comfort With 'After You'

Modern Malian Singer Fatoumata Diawara Respects Her Roots

Malian singer-songwriter, guitarist, and actorFatoumata Diawarais amultiple Grammy Award nominee, currently living in Paris."Fatou"Diawarahas become an enthusiastic collaborator - with musicians from other African countries - Cheikh Lô, AfroCubism, and Orchestra Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou - as well as rock stars like Damon Albarn and Flea and traditional players from Cuba and Brittany. She has also worked as a social activist, campaigning against the trafficking and sale of black migrants in Libyan slave markets. On her most recent, Fenfo (“Something to Say”), electric guitarriffs combine with the strings of the kora and kamel ngoni and drum kit combines with the timeless rhythms of traditional percussion. The record was co-produced by French auteur Matthieu Chedid aka M, who plays guitar and organ, and the versatile cellist Vincent Segal is a guest on a few tracks. Fatoumata Diawarasharesthe fruits of her latest musicaladventures, in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the session here:

30 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Modern Malian Singer Fatoumata Diawara Respects Her Roots

Filmic Down-Tuned Piano Music By Dutch Composer Joep Beving

Dutch pianist and composer Joep Beving records for the world’s most prestigious classical music label,but his streaming numbers are more like a pop star. Hecreatesintrospective and often filmic instrumental piano compositions,representing a quest for essence and beauty.Beving plays one piece from each of his mostly solo piano records on adown-tuned piano (A=432), in-studio. - Caryn Havlik Watch the session here:

35 MINFEB. 29
Comments
Filmic Down-Tuned Piano Music By Dutch Composer Joep Beving
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