Best Geology Education Podcasts

Best Geology Education Podcasts

The top radio content and podcasts about Geology Education that we select for you from 500,000+ podcast channels
Last Update: 2020-02-27
Trading Bitcoin: The Tone Vays Podcast
Trading Bitcoin: The Tone Vays Podcast
5 d ago
Private Key Publishing
Tone worked on Wall Street for almost 10 years starting as a Risk Analyst at Bear Stearns and later becoming a VP at JP Morgan Chase, in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in Economic Trends, Trading and Risk Analysis. Ever since getting involved in the Crypto Currency ecosystem in early 2013, he has been very active in spreading the relevance and importance of this technology as it helps promote economic freedom. Tone has been featured in several Documentaries likeMagic Money& Bitcoin - Beyond the Bubble. Tone is now an independent content creator atToneVays.comand on hisYouTube Channelfocused on sound economics & finance. Tone holds a Masters Degree in Financial Engineering from Florida State University along with Bachelor Degrees in Mathematics and Geology. Twitter: https://twitter.com/ToneVays Website: https://tonevays.com Trading Information: http://LibertyLifeTrail.com Bitcoin: 3Hk9cR6p8XAAbmD2GkvSdcbznhqXvLDX4o Learn Trading: http://www.libertylifetrail.com/education/learntrading/ Upcoming Seminars: https://tonevays.com/workshops Private Consulting: http://www.libertylifetrail.com/consulting/ Tone Vays is available for consulting at the rate of 0.1 btc per hour. Please email Tone@protonmail.ch for additional info. Follow The Tone Vays Podcast on Telegram! https://t.me/ToneVaysPodcastBot Follow the best podcasts from the best minds in the Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency space on twitter. https://twitter.com/bitcoinpodcasts
Aaron Klug
Aaron Klug
2019 SEP 24
Academy of Achievement
Since the discovery of the DNA molecule in the 1950s, scientists have had a rough understanding of its structure, but for almost 30 years they labored in darkness, unable to see the actual object of their study. It took Sir Aaron Klug to shine a light down this dark corridor. Drawing on the latest advances in computers, optics and mathematics, Sir Aaron used the electron microscope and his own knowledge of x-ray crystallography to generate the first three-dimensional images of genetic material, enabling researchers to lay eyes on the actual building blocks of life. Hailed by his peers as a pioneering "geographer of molecular geology," Aaron Klug received the Nobel Prize in 1982 for his innovative work investigating and mapping the structure of genes. Born in Lithuania and educated in South Africa, Aaron Klug has carried out his research in England since the early 1950s. He was knighted by the Queen in 1988. From 1995 to 2000 he served as President of the Royal Society, Britain's leading scientific organization, once headed by Sir Isaac Newton. An ardent supporter of unfettered scientific research, he is outspoken in his belief that "the human genome itself must be freely available to all humankind." In this podcast, recorded at the 2000 International Achievement Summit in London England, he recounts his career in science and the DNA structures he illuminated. He also discusses role as President of the Royal Society and the government's role in regulating genetic technology.
Science Sisters: Stories of Success in STEM
Science Sisters: Stories of Success in STEM
2019 NOV 30
Shenandoa Toote
Get inspiration, advice. Learn tips from like-minded minorities on similar journeys in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Eavesdrop as Shenandoa Toote (MS in Vision Science, Certified Coach) interviews women across the US. Find support, shortcuts. Optimize your focus. STEM fields come with challenges for everyone. Professional perspectives of colleagues just ahead of you in reaching goals are invaluable. Minority women, like Hidden Figures, have impacted STEM opportunities. Successful black scientists had community in competitive career paths. And you? Living with unexpected roadblocks: money issues, homesickness, men who believe women are not critical thinkers, lack of classroom skin color and gender diversity, when to use a resume vs a CV, knowing who is your advisor, mentor, or sponsor...these discussions equip you to make decisions, give you ideas for internships, research/laboratory or work experience, provide insights on career paths outside of academia (professorship/tenure) & industry, like corporate business. Info for students in high school/college beginning to plan for higher education, recent university graduates, or post-doctoral fellows. Get practical insights, suggestions, tricks. Celebrate black & women's history months, international day of women & girls in science. Cell Biology Zoology Genetics Pharmacology Toxicology Ecology Drafting Physiology Civil Design Biochemistry Pathology Operations Astronomy Nuclear Surveying Statistics Physics Psychology Atmospheric Experimental Natural Conservation Immunology Veterinary Industrial Computational Manufacturing Mining Safety Medicine Military Meteorology Quantitative Applied Space Aerospace Marine Sustainable Agriculture Dairy Livestock Poultry Agronomy Horticulture Breeding Protection Integrated Pest Range Chemistry Environmental Wetlands Urban Forestry Pulp Fish Wildlands Communication Animation Video Effects AI Informatics Programming Vendor Certification Analyst Page Digital Modeling Warehousing Database Graphics Modeling Virtual Environments Simulation Telecommunications Networking LAN WAN Security Assurance Multimedia Webmaster Project Bioengineering Ceramic Biomolecular Structural Transportation Highway Hardware Laser Mechanics Mineral Architecture Petroleum Textile Construction Mechatronics Robotics Automation Laser Integrated Circuit Instrumentation Robotics Heating Ventilation Conditioning Refrigeration Solar Quality Wastewater Recycling Hazardous Plastics Welding Semiconductor Occupational Automotive Hydraulics Fluid Software Packaging Nanotechnology Structural Photo Radiation Radio Biophysics Botany Phytopathology Histology Developmental Embryology Bacteriology Virology Parasitology Mycology Entomology Behavior Ethology Wildlife Microbial Eukaryotic Genomics Endocrinology Reproductive Cardiovascular Exercise Vision Optics Oncology Cancer Molecular Biometry Bioinformatics Biomathematics Biotechnology Aquatic Limnology Systematics Epidemiology Neuroanatomy Neurosciences Algebra Functional Geometry Topology Financial Probability Airpower Art Naval Strategic Signal Geospatial Joint Media Cyber Warfare Combat Directed Energy Acoustics Observables Stealth Operational Undersea Warfare Ground Aircraft Armament Explosive Bomb Disposal Task Force Missile Munitions Ordinance Radar Communications Biopsychology Nutrition Interaction Sustainability Astrophysics Planetary Climatology Dynamics Inorganic Organic Polymer Geology Geochemistry Geophysics Seismology Paleontology Hydrology Petrology Oceanography Geosciences Atomic Particle Plasma Temperature Condensed Matter Acoustics Biotechnology Power Cognitive Psycholinguistics Comparative Social Psychometrics Cyber Forensics Counterterrorism Archeology Econometrics Geographic Cartography Aeronautics Aviation Cytotechnology Pharmaceutics Pharmacognosy Pharmacoeconomics Cosmetic Preventive Epidemiology Health
Roger Revelle
Roger Revelle
2019 SEP 24
Academy of Achievement
Roger Revelle (March 7, 1909 – July 15, 1991) was one of the first scientists to predict and study global warming and the movement of Earth's tectonic plates, and was also instrumental in the formation of the University of California, San Diego. One of the world's most articulate spokesmen for science, he made his first mark in oceanography as a scientist, explorer and an administrator. The son of two schoolteachers in Seattle, he attended Pomona College and under the influence of charismatic professor Alfred Woodward, became interested in geology. In 1936, he earned his doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley, and soon was on a path of leadership in international scientific affairs. One of his first major accomplishments was his proposal that the continuing addition of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, oceans, and biosphere could lead to global warming. In a seminal paper in 1957, Dr. Revelle argued that the world's citizenry was performing "a great geophysical experiment" and called on the scientific community to monitor changes in the carbon dioxide content of the waters and the air. He later argued that the developing nations of the world were demanding special treatment on the limitations on the combustion of fossil fuels and that the carbon dioxide problem had become a "global economic experiment." In the 1950s, he was the intellectual architect for the creation of a University of California campus at La Jolla which involved the establishment of "a modern-day Athens where scholars would have a golden environment in which to think and create" with a heavy concentration on graduate education. Professor Revelle played a key role in the founding, in 1970, of the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment of the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU). In 1986, he underscored the committee's initiatives to "understand the interaction of the great global physical, chemical, and biological systems regulating Earth's favorable environment for life, and the influence of human activity on that environment." From 1964 to 1974, Dr. Revelle was the Director of the Center for Population Studies at Harvard University. In 1976, he returned to UC San Diego as a professor of science and public policy. In 1991, Dr. Revelle received the National Medal of Science from President George H.W. Bush as one of the twentieth century's most eminent scientists. Roger Revelle addressed the student delegates at the 1985 Achievement Summit in Denver, Colorado and spoke about his lifetime as a scientist, educator, and environmentalist.

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