Best Sociology Education Podcasts

Best Sociology Education Podcasts

The top radio content and podcasts about Sociology Education that we select for you from 500,000+ podcast channels
Last Update: 2020-04-03
Women's Spaces Radio Show
Women's Spaces Radio Show
1 w ago
Elaine B. Holtz and Kenneth E. Norton
Women's Spaces is a 57-minute weekly show originally broadcast live Monday morning over Radio KBBF 89.1 FM from its Santa Rosa, CA studio.. Elaine B. Holtz is the host and she co- produces the show with her partner Kenneth Norton. Most guests are women and the show is intended to inspire the listener to become more active in affairs affecting the health and peace of the community for generations to come. The music selections interspersing the show feature women artists. The shows are archived with reference links at https://www.womensspaces.com/ Elaine first produced the show Women’s Spaces in 1978 on Radio KBBF FM, the nation's first bilingual radio station, and the show lasted until 1981. In 2007 Elaine with her partner Kenneth Norton resurrected the show for TV with her first TV broadcast on Santa Rosa Community station through Comcast Cable Access. Elaine produced over 300 Women's Spaces TV shows by November 2014 when the TV show ended. In September 2012 Elaine again began producing the Women's Spaces Radio Show on Radio KBBF. Elaine as a single mom was a student in the first Women's Studies Department of Sonoma State University where she graduated in 1975 with her B.A. in Sociology and gave the Graduation Speech. She then earned her M.A. in Education from San Francisco State University in 1978. She has always had a special interest in the needs and talents of women. In 2017 Elaine was appointed the current President of the Sonoma County Chapter of the National Organization of Women (NOW). She lives in Santa Rosa with her partner Ken. Kenneth Norton earned his master's degree in Materials Science from Stanford University as the Vietnam War was ending. During that time Ken served as the personal assistant to a poet/sociologist Dr. William Hermanns as he prepared his writings for publication, exposing Ken to not only the sciences but also the humanities and comparative religion for making conscious and conscionable choices. Ken is a regular contributor to Radio Spotlight Magazine on Radio KOWS 92.5 FM with his 5-minute episodes on the Scent of Light.
5MIWeekly (audio)
5MIWeekly (audio)
JAN 8
E5MIWeekly (audio)
Why 5 Minutes of Intercourse? As a long-time human-sexuality professor—aka., an old human-sexuality professor, I have gained tidbits over the years guaranteed to capture students’ attention. One of these tidbits is the four fs. The four fs are the four basic drives behind your every feeling, action, or thought. No matter your culture, gender, orientation, age, or time in which you are living in history, we all have these drives in common. You probably guessed each of these drives begins with the letter f, but do you know what these drives are? Answer: Feeding, Fighting, Fleeing, and Sex. (Hey! I thought all the drives were supposed to begin with the letter f?) Your survival is based upon your: 1) drive to eat, 2) assertive and aggressive tendencies, 3) fears and ability to escape danger, and 4) sexual drives. Since the four fs are the bases of our existence, you might assume people are without biases, discussing, analyzing, and studying them throughout their lifetimes. However, this appears to be the case for only three of the four fs. Care to guess which f is least likely to be addressed within authentic, real, and objective conversations? Without shame, judgment, or taboos, 5 Minutes of Intercourse is an opportunity for you to think openly and objectively about sex. Using science as a lens, this channel playfully examines fundamental aspects of human sexuality, including gender, orientation, anatomy, physiology, fantasies, behaviors, paraphilias, and consent. My hope is these examinations combined with your thoughts will allow you to expand your topics of authentic conversations with others to include the fourth f, sex. Sex “Education” Whom do you use for answers to your most private questions about sex? Lovers, friends, doctors, family, clergy—or Google? Google processes over 3.5 billion search queries per day—many of which, performed under cloak of anonymity, are about sex. So, what kinds of sex questions are asked on Google—are they about extramarital affairs, pornography, fetishes…? Some are—but most are simple and basic. “How big should my penis be?” “Is it healthy for my vagina to smell like vinegar?” “How can I make my boyfriend climax more quickly?” “Why is sex painful?” “What exactly is an orgasm?” These searches clearly show we have tremendous interests in our sexuality—as we should. However, the accuracy of the answers provided by friends, family—and even Google, remains to be seen. I have built 5 Minutes of Intercourse upon a promise. I promise if you visit weekly, then you will not need (as many) clandestine excursions on Google because 5 Minutes of Intercourse provides unbiased and scientifically-based answers to many of the questions you likely have about sexuality. Sexual Literacy 5 Minutes of Intercourse is forever exploring sexually literacy. Sexual literacy is the core of our sexuality—it drives our biological goals (e.g., pregnancy and pleasure), psychological goals (e.g., love and self-esteem), and sociological goals (e.g., marriage and status) to be formed, fully explored, and successfully achieved. Despite barriers standing in the way of our natural explorations of sexual literacy, 5 Minutes of Intercourse will allow you to (1) question why general beliefs about sex are often inaccurate, (2) test your levels of sexual knowledge, and (3) introspect upon definitions of sexuality, sexual development, and sexual health. Always looking forward to our intercourse, Dr. Don
Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
9 h ago
Loyal Books
Considered to mark the emergence of a new literary form, the unvarnished autobiography, Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau was first published in 1782, four years after his death. The philosopher and educationist whose political philosophy is credited with having inspired the French Revolution, Rousseau was a man of immense wit, talent and depth of thinking. His skill in art, music, literature and cooking along with his magnificent body of work in philosophy, politics, education and sociology have made him a legendary figure. However, through Confessions, he aimed to present a complete picture of himself, exposing all the unsavory and shameful incidents in his private life as well as the public persona. Confessions deals with the first fifty-three years of his life and he completed it in 1769 and conducted many public readings of extracts before his death in 1778. This is an extremely thought-provoking book and its ideas remain as fresh and stimulating as they did more than two centuries ago. The entire book consists of two volumes of six books each and Rousseau apparently planned a third which he could not undertake. Though two previous autobiographies, by Saint Augustine and Saint Theresa, had been written earlier, both of them had focused more on their religious experiences. Rousseau writes in the opening lines, “.... the man I shall portray will be myself,” thus vowing to be honest and sincere. And truthful he proved to be. The dark side of his personal life, his affair with a house-maid and the children that were born and given away to protect his honor are faithfully chronicled alongside his brilliant thoughts on education, freedom, social inequality, the general will and common interest of society, collective sovereignty and the supreme importance of individual freedom. For those interested in the foundations of modern European thought, Confessions is indeed an interesting read.
Myelin & Melanin™ Podcast
Myelin & Melanin™ Podcast
5 d ago
Myelin & Melanin™
Podcast hosted by Dawn and Daana -- two Black women musing about life with Multiple Sclerosis. Dawn is a 44-year-old mother, living in the Atlanta, GA area. She was diagnosed with RRMS in 2000. She has a BA in American Studies from SUNY Buffalo and completed her graduate work in English as a Second Language at American University. In 2001, Dawn was on track to begin a Ph.D. program; however, life got in the way and an MS diagnosis became the focus. She was an elementary ESL teacher for fifteen years and now teaches ESL courses at Anne Arundel and Howard Community College on a part-time basis. Daana is 39 years old, living in Milwaukee, WI. She was diagnosed with RRMS in 2004. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Africology, a Master of Science in Cultural Foundations of Education, and is a Ph.D. candidate in Social Foundations of Education, with a specialization in Sociology. She is resigned to the fact that her PhD candidate status will likely be in perpetuity, as finishing her dissertation presents a unique set of challenges in combination with health issues. Daana has been teaching college sociology for 14 years, and currently teaches part-time. Daana’s DMDs have ranged from Avonex, to Tysabri to LEMTRADA (final infusion in 2016) — with IV steroids, plasmapheresis and botox injections in between over the years. She began Ocrevus in December 2018, after new lesions were found post-LEMTRADA. Dawn and Daana met in 2016 in a Facebook group dedicated to the drug LEMTRADA. Though they live in two different states, in two different parts of the country, through the amazing power of technology, they virtually join each other to share their experiences about living life with MS.
Iraq - A Decade of New Governance
Iraq - A Decade of New Governance
2019 OCT 18
Cambridge University
2013 marks the ten year anniversary of the invasion of Iraq by US and UK forces, the swift and catastrophic collapse of Saddam Hussein’s Ba’athist regime, and the beginning of a period of occupation and radical societal change. On 16th October 2003, United Nations Security Council Resolution 1511 unanimously sanctioned a long-term international presence in Iraq effectively handing control of the country to Washington. This landmark date acts as the anchor of post- conflict governance in Iraq. The latter years of the past decade have seen the fledgling post-Ba’athist Iraq situated in an increasingly fragile landscape. The centralisation of power by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, including his increasing influence over the Ministries of Defence and Interior, the integrity and electoral commissions, the central bank, and the judiciary, was challenged by a seemingly cross- ethnic and cross-communal alliance that included the Kurdistan Alliance, led by Masoud Barzani, al-Ahrar (Sadrists), led by Muqtada al-Sadr, and al-Iraqiya, led by Ayad Allawi. The April 2013 provincial elections proved that the PM’s consolidation of power and attempt to create an external Sunni, intra-Shi’i, and Kurdish threat was not impenetrable, as his State of Law Coalition did not gain as many seats as expected, particularly among its Shi’i base. 10 years on, Iraqis are still faced with a security dilemma. According to the Iraqi government, May 2013 accounted for 630 civilian deaths caused by insurgents – the highest since April 2008. In addition, the government appears unable to meet the needs of its citizenry – a Gallup poll suggests increasing dissatisfaction with government services (security, electricity, health, water, employment, and education), from 50% in 2010 to 64% in 2012. While the militarized sectarianism that engulfed Iraq in a civil war from 2006-2008 is no longer a factor, the Iraqi polity is still marred by divisions. This conference seeks to address a number of core issues, including the strength of political trust and citizenship, the socio-economic situation and prospects for an oil-exporting future, and the precarious domestic and regional security environment. Tensions over the Iranian nuclear programme continue to escalate, whilst Syria is undergoing a process of cataclysmic disintegration. Throughout the region, the tremors and after-shocks of the so-called ‘Arab Spring’ seem to show no signs of abatement, as both post-revolution societies, and those in which no radical change has taken place, wrestle with a wide range of political and social dilemmas stemming from issues of self-definition and self-realisation. Some claim that Iraq was the first domino in the ‘Arab Spring’ pack. Regardless of the (un)likelihood of this line of argument, the experience of Iraq may have important things to teach us with respect to other Arab nations undergoing similar radical social and political upheaval – particularly with non- homogenous populations. Weaving together salient themes from Politics and International Studies, Middle Eastern Studies, Economics, Law, Sociology, History, and Anthropology, and drawing in experts and practitioners from these fields, this conference will offer theoretical and empirical insights into contemporary Iraq. The lessons learned will be used to aid and direct future research and theoretical modelling in post-conflict states and societies. Moreover,following a request from the Iraq Institute for Strategic Studies, this conference will also launch the Iraq Studies Academic Network, intended to bring together students and scholars and to provide an ongoing resource database for continued research. The conference plans to engage post-graduate students from multiple faculties with the officials and academics that have played a role in the study of Iraq. Panels will spend considerable time answering questions from the fl

Listen Now On Himalaya

app storegoogle play