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voiceofthedba's podcast

Steve Jones

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voiceofthedba's podcast

voiceofthedba's podcast

Steve Jones

1
Followers
1
Plays
OVERVIEWEPISODESYOU MAY ALSO LIKE

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About Us

A series of episodes that look at databases and the world from a data professional's viewpoint. Written and recorded by Steve Jones, editor of SQLServerCentral and The Voice of the DBA.

Latest Episodes

Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

One of the research areas at the Redgate Foundry is in estate management, trying to better understand how people manage an estate of servers. These could be physical servers you own, VMs in a hosted or cloud situation, or even a platform service like Azure SQL Database or AWS RDS. In today's world with a myriad of choices, it's easy to lose control of your estate of servers. I saw a quote recently from someone that was struggling with their estate. They said: "The moment it goes red, if you don't know what it should be, then you're clutching at straws." Read the rest of Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

3 min1 d ago
Comments
Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

The Habits of Better Teams

As a developer, I've often worked with a team of others, where we discussed the software we were building, what architectures and patterns to adopt, etc. While we all learned to work together, there were plenty of times that it felt as if we were working separately on code, but arguing often about how to make a decision about a technical approach or a priority. As a DBA, I've often worked alone, though usually interfacing with different teams as needed. In these cases, I've often had to learn to make my own decisions and then justify those to others later. The few times I worked with a team of DBAs, it seemed as though this was still the model, independent work, though with everyone deferring to the senior DBA. Read the rest of The Habits of Better Teams

3 min6 d ago
Comments
The Habits of Better Teams

The New Normal Annoyances

Recently I re-ran an old editorial on annoyances. The world of work has changed for many of us. For the last few months, many of us have previously worked in offices have had to work at home. We often have partners, roommates, spouses, kids, pets, and more that distract us from the environment we're used to being in while working on the data platform. I don't know how the world of work will change, but I do know it will. As I write this, I'm not sure when I'll actually be able to go back to an office to work. While I don't go often, I am looking forward to spending a few days here and there with others when I'm able. What I'm not sure about is whether I'll see lots of people or just a few. Will there be rotations of who's in the office during the week? Will I, as an outsider, be able to meet with the large variety of developers I'm used to seeing, or am I an infection vector to be avoided? Read the rest of The New Normal Annoyances

3 min1 w ago
Comments
The New Normal Annoyances

Compatibility Level Confidence

SQL Server databases have had a compatibility level in them for a long time. This is a number that essentially corresponds to a version. We had 70 for version 7.0, and then we went to 80 for SQL Server 2000, 90 for 2005, and we currently are at 150, which you just have to know maps to 2019. I really miss real version numbers. In any case, there is this statement on the Compatibility Certification page that says this: " As long as the application does not need to leverage enhancements that are only available in a higher database compatibility level, it is a valid approach to upgrade the SQL Server Database Engine and maintain the previous database compatibility level, with no need to recertify an application. " Read the rest of Compatibility Level Confidence

2 min1 w ago
Comments
Compatibility Level Confidence

Aiming for Better Data Governance

At Redgate, we have customers all over the world. I'm lucky that I get to work with, and sometimes meet, people dealing with all sorts of situations, environments, and even regional challenges. As a dev and DBA, I've never worried about anything other than varchar(). Now I have customers that have lots of languages and other issues that need to be accounted for in their designs. One of the areas that has become more important in the last few years is Data Privacy and Protection. Between the GDPR and other legislation, and growing concern from customers, many organizations are starting to pay more attention to this area. Less so in the US, where we seem to be behind most of the rest of the world. Read the rest of Aiming for Better Data Governance

2 min1 w ago
Comments
Aiming for Better Data Governance

The Challenges of Splitting a Table

I ran across a discussion on Reddit about splitting a table. In this case, the original post had to do with a vertical partition of data, which is a technique that can help you better manage data in your database. However, I haven't often seen this technique employed in the real world. I wonder how many of you have considered a vertical partition when you are modeling data. Often we may not think about this early in the lifecycle of an entity, but as it grows, you might think about reducing the amount of data you often query in some way, and a vertical partition can help. Read the rest of The Challenges of Splitting a Table

2 min2 w ago
Comments
The Challenges of Splitting a Table

Choosing a VCS

As someone that speaks and promotes DevOps, I get asked for recommendations and specifics all the time for tooling. One of the questions I'll get asked regularly is about version control. First, use it. There's no excuse for not using version control these days, especially as most of the software out there is free. My view is that Git is really the choice these days. Most IDEs and software tools work with git, and if they don't, likely they don't support version control. While there are lots of choices out there, and I've used a lot in my career, it seems that Git has really won and is the default choice for so many organizations. What's interesting is so many of the surveys and tracking of version control systems tend to rank the most often used hosting services, all of which use Git. Read the rest of Choosing a VCS

3 min2 w ago
Comments
Choosing a VCS

Remote Work Benefits

It seems as though many of us that have been remote working will continue to do so. I see some offices opening, but not many. I had one friend that had everyone go back to their office in Denver, but they tend to all close their office doors so they don't have to wear masks and they do their meetings over Zoom. Seems crazy to go into the office for that. The weight of this type of work continuing for the next six or more months has been a little tough for me at times. That sounds crazy, for someone that's been a remote worker for over a decade, but I used to regularly go to offices, visit people, or even go work in Starbucks. Those types of things aren't happening for me now. I am going to try and see if I can get a few more lunches with friends, especially when the weather changes a bit. Read the rest of Remote Work Benefits

3 min2 w ago
Comments
Remote Work Benefits

The Real Life Software Movie Plot

It wasn't that long ago that Firewall was released. In it, a security executive has his family taken hostage, with the plot being that the executive will help the criminals rob the bank that he's spent years protecting or his family will be killed. While I haven't heard of this extreme happening in the real world, I wonder how far away we are from this. Recently, there was a less violent attempt at hacking, with someone offering a Tesla employee over US$1mm to slip ransomware into their network. The idea would have been to threaten Tesla with data release unless they paid up. The details are interesting, and supposedly the ransomware cost US$250,000 to build, but another company paid US$4.5mm to criminals, so maybe this would have been very profitable. Read the rest of The Real Life Software Movie Plot

2 min2 w ago
Comments
The Real Life Software Movie Plot

Do You Have Big Data?

Data sizes are always growing. Stats on world data are astounding, as are the stats many of us experience in our lives. Plenty of us have moved from MB management to GBs, and I see plenty of people dealing with TB storage at home. Most of that data is likely from images and video, but I wouldn't be surprised to find some people capturing lots of IoT and other random data about their lives. As data professionals, likely we don't quite have the explosion of data inside our organizations, but we certainly do have increasing database sizes. I see this with customers all the time, often with continued or expanded collection of data and no archival plans. The number of customers with > 1TB databases increases every year. Read the rest of Do You Have Big Data?

2 min2 w ago
Comments
Do You Have Big Data?

Latest Episodes

Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

One of the research areas at the Redgate Foundry is in estate management, trying to better understand how people manage an estate of servers. These could be physical servers you own, VMs in a hosted or cloud situation, or even a platform service like Azure SQL Database or AWS RDS. In today's world with a myriad of choices, it's easy to lose control of your estate of servers. I saw a quote recently from someone that was struggling with their estate. They said: "The moment it goes red, if you don't know what it should be, then you're clutching at straws." Read the rest of Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

3 min1 d ago
Comments
Do You Know What the Settings Should Be?

The Habits of Better Teams

As a developer, I've often worked with a team of others, where we discussed the software we were building, what architectures and patterns to adopt, etc. While we all learned to work together, there were plenty of times that it felt as if we were working separately on code, but arguing often about how to make a decision about a technical approach or a priority. As a DBA, I've often worked alone, though usually interfacing with different teams as needed. In these cases, I've often had to learn to make my own decisions and then justify those to others later. The few times I worked with a team of DBAs, it seemed as though this was still the model, independent work, though with everyone deferring to the senior DBA. Read the rest of The Habits of Better Teams

3 min6 d ago
Comments
The Habits of Better Teams

The New Normal Annoyances

Recently I re-ran an old editorial on annoyances. The world of work has changed for many of us. For the last few months, many of us have previously worked in offices have had to work at home. We often have partners, roommates, spouses, kids, pets, and more that distract us from the environment we're used to being in while working on the data platform. I don't know how the world of work will change, but I do know it will. As I write this, I'm not sure when I'll actually be able to go back to an office to work. While I don't go often, I am looking forward to spending a few days here and there with others when I'm able. What I'm not sure about is whether I'll see lots of people or just a few. Will there be rotations of who's in the office during the week? Will I, as an outsider, be able to meet with the large variety of developers I'm used to seeing, or am I an infection vector to be avoided? Read the rest of The New Normal Annoyances

3 min1 w ago
Comments
The New Normal Annoyances

Compatibility Level Confidence

SQL Server databases have had a compatibility level in them for a long time. This is a number that essentially corresponds to a version. We had 70 for version 7.0, and then we went to 80 for SQL Server 2000, 90 for 2005, and we currently are at 150, which you just have to know maps to 2019. I really miss real version numbers. In any case, there is this statement on the Compatibility Certification page that says this: " As long as the application does not need to leverage enhancements that are only available in a higher database compatibility level, it is a valid approach to upgrade the SQL Server Database Engine and maintain the previous database compatibility level, with no need to recertify an application. " Read the rest of Compatibility Level Confidence

2 min1 w ago
Comments
Compatibility Level Confidence

Aiming for Better Data Governance

At Redgate, we have customers all over the world. I'm lucky that I get to work with, and sometimes meet, people dealing with all sorts of situations, environments, and even regional challenges. As a dev and DBA, I've never worried about anything other than varchar(). Now I have customers that have lots of languages and other issues that need to be accounted for in their designs. One of the areas that has become more important in the last few years is Data Privacy and Protection. Between the GDPR and other legislation, and growing concern from customers, many organizations are starting to pay more attention to this area. Less so in the US, where we seem to be behind most of the rest of the world. Read the rest of Aiming for Better Data Governance

2 min1 w ago
Comments
Aiming for Better Data Governance

The Challenges of Splitting a Table

I ran across a discussion on Reddit about splitting a table. In this case, the original post had to do with a vertical partition of data, which is a technique that can help you better manage data in your database. However, I haven't often seen this technique employed in the real world. I wonder how many of you have considered a vertical partition when you are modeling data. Often we may not think about this early in the lifecycle of an entity, but as it grows, you might think about reducing the amount of data you often query in some way, and a vertical partition can help. Read the rest of The Challenges of Splitting a Table

2 min2 w ago
Comments
The Challenges of Splitting a Table

Choosing a VCS

As someone that speaks and promotes DevOps, I get asked for recommendations and specifics all the time for tooling. One of the questions I'll get asked regularly is about version control. First, use it. There's no excuse for not using version control these days, especially as most of the software out there is free. My view is that Git is really the choice these days. Most IDEs and software tools work with git, and if they don't, likely they don't support version control. While there are lots of choices out there, and I've used a lot in my career, it seems that Git has really won and is the default choice for so many organizations. What's interesting is so many of the surveys and tracking of version control systems tend to rank the most often used hosting services, all of which use Git. Read the rest of Choosing a VCS

3 min2 w ago
Comments
Choosing a VCS

Remote Work Benefits

It seems as though many of us that have been remote working will continue to do so. I see some offices opening, but not many. I had one friend that had everyone go back to their office in Denver, but they tend to all close their office doors so they don't have to wear masks and they do their meetings over Zoom. Seems crazy to go into the office for that. The weight of this type of work continuing for the next six or more months has been a little tough for me at times. That sounds crazy, for someone that's been a remote worker for over a decade, but I used to regularly go to offices, visit people, or even go work in Starbucks. Those types of things aren't happening for me now. I am going to try and see if I can get a few more lunches with friends, especially when the weather changes a bit. Read the rest of Remote Work Benefits

3 min2 w ago
Comments
Remote Work Benefits

The Real Life Software Movie Plot

It wasn't that long ago that Firewall was released. In it, a security executive has his family taken hostage, with the plot being that the executive will help the criminals rob the bank that he's spent years protecting or his family will be killed. While I haven't heard of this extreme happening in the real world, I wonder how far away we are from this. Recently, there was a less violent attempt at hacking, with someone offering a Tesla employee over US$1mm to slip ransomware into their network. The idea would have been to threaten Tesla with data release unless they paid up. The details are interesting, and supposedly the ransomware cost US$250,000 to build, but another company paid US$4.5mm to criminals, so maybe this would have been very profitable. Read the rest of The Real Life Software Movie Plot

2 min2 w ago
Comments
The Real Life Software Movie Plot

Do You Have Big Data?

Data sizes are always growing. Stats on world data are astounding, as are the stats many of us experience in our lives. Plenty of us have moved from MB management to GBs, and I see plenty of people dealing with TB storage at home. Most of that data is likely from images and video, but I wouldn't be surprised to find some people capturing lots of IoT and other random data about their lives. As data professionals, likely we don't quite have the explosion of data inside our organizations, but we certainly do have increasing database sizes. I see this with customers all the time, often with continued or expanded collection of data and no archival plans. The number of customers with > 1TB databases increases every year. Read the rest of Do You Have Big Data?

2 min2 w ago
Comments
Do You Have Big Data?
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