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Political Theater

CQ Roll Call

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Political Theater

Political Theater

CQ Roll Call

3
Followers
2
Plays
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About Us

Have you ever asked, “WTF?,” about politics? Or, “who are these people making decisions about my life?” Political Theater pulls back the curtain on the stunts, antics and motivations that drive Washington. Host Jason Dick and the Roll Call team spotlight the spectacle, the players and what’s going on behind the curtain in Washington’s long-running drama: Congress.

Latest Episodes

'The consulting class is going ape-s***' -- The Lincoln Project, explained

If you’ve been anywhere near cable news or social media in the last few months, you have probably seen an ad by the Lincoln Project. The group of Republicans who have aggressively gone after President Donald Trump on cable news and social media. Lincoln Project Senior Advisor Kurt Bardella,explains what motivates the group, what they hope to accomplish and the pushback they've gotten from their GOP brethren. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

20 min3 d ago
Comments
'The consulting class is going ape-s***' -- The Lincoln Project, explained

‘Surge’ part of ongoing surge in political documentaries

If you ran for Congress in 2018, there was a pretty good chance you are part of a political documentary. First came “Knock Down the House,” which featured a (then) little known candidate, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and now comes “Surge,” which follows women who ran against veteran Republican incumbents. Political Reporters Bridget Bowman and Kate Ackley spoke to Rep. Lauren Underwood, a star of “Surge,” and filmmakers Wendy Sachs and Hannah Rosenzweig about their new movie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

23 min1 w ago
Comments
‘Surge’ part of ongoing surge in political documentaries

Keynote candidates and no-shows: Who we talk about when we talk about political conventions

One of the few things that is not different about this year’s political conventions is that the parties are providing valuable national airtime to candidates for Congress whom they want to see succeed. Who shows up, and who doesn’t, provide context for those House and Senate races, even if some of that context is, quite frankly, mystifying. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

25 min3 w ago
Comments
Keynote candidates and no-shows: Who we talk about when we talk about political conventions

Virtually the same? This year’s unconventional Democratic National Convention

We don’t need hindsight to see that 2020 is a year unlike any other in recent memory. The coronavirus pandemic has touched every fiber of our lives and woven itself inextricably into the fold of presidential politics, including the national conventions blanketing the airwaves this week and next. Usually, the Republican and Democratic parties live up to their collective nouns and really get down at these weeklong rallies, but that’s a no-go with a pandemic raging. Instead of convening in person, the conventions are going virtual. It’s yet another wholly unconventional move made this year that still somehow feels inevitable and even downright sensible. The conventions haven’t served their original purpose — actually picking a presidential candidate — since 1952. Both parties shifted to letting primaries and caucuses select their electoral champions — a move begun during the Progressive Era that accelerated in 1968 following the chaos that unfurled outside of the DNC in Chicago when several nights of protests led to a clash between police and demonstrators. The last time there was even a specter of doubt about who’d be the nominee was in 1980, when Ted Kennedy made a late push to replace President Jimmy Carter on the Democratic ticket. So perhaps it makes sense to finally drop the pretenses and hold an eight-hour infomercial over four nights. In a way, it’s a callback to an earlier time — campaigns used to regularly buy up prime-time, hourlong blocks on the networks to make televised appeals to the electorate. The pandemic has brought the parties full circle. To talk about this year’s decidedly different DNC, we spoke with Julia Terruso, 2020 presidential campaign reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer. We also talked about the state of the race in Pennsylvania, the keystone battleground state for the Biden campaign. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

23 minAUG 20
Comments
Virtually the same? This year’s unconventional Democratic National Convention

'It's just history': Kamala Harris' historic run as VP

Kamala Harris' historic run as vice president comes at a time of big societal and generational changes. Roll Call columnist Mary C. Curtis, who covers the intersection of politics, culture and race, discusses the significance of the California Democrat's spot on the 2020 ticket with Joe Biden. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

25 minAUG 13
Comments
'It's just history': Kamala Harris' historic run as VP

‘It is exhausting’: Women in Congress recount shared experiences

Congress has a record number of women in its ranks, and it doesn't matter if they are Democrats or Republicans, junior members or elected leaders: They share a common set of experiences about being talked down to, overlooked or outright scorned. Heard on the Hill's Kathryn Lyons spoke to some of them and recounts their stories. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

30 minAUG 6
Comments
‘It is exhausting’: Women in Congress recount shared experiences

From middle school to Congress: Jamaal Bowman’s journey

Jamaal Bowman isn’t your average former middle school principal. That’s because the 44-year-old recently beat veteran Congressman Eliot Engel in the Democratic primary in New York’s 16th District. He's part of a changing of the guard of younger, minority politicians who are on their way to Congress. Clyde McGrady discusses his recent conversation with the educator-turned-prospective lawmaker. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

24 minJUL 30
Comments
From middle school to Congress: Jamaal Bowman’s journey

Remembering John Lewis, in his own words

Since Rep. John Lewis' death on July 17, his colleagues have paid tribute and remembered him in ways big and small. And his own words, like the ones we gathered here, make a fitting memorial to a figure whose public service crossed boundaries and generations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

10 minJUL 24
Comments
Remembering John Lewis, in his own words

For Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the fight for voting rights goes way back

The struggle to ensure people have access to the ballot box is one that G.K. Butterfield and his family have been involved in dating back to the early 20th Century. The North Carolina Democrat’s history in Wilson, N.C., is indelibly shaped by his immigrant father and his decades-long advocacy on behalf of Black suffrage in a place notoriously resistant to it. It extends through Butterfield's own place in the Civil Rights Era, and continues to the present day with his own legislative priorities. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

17 minJUL 16
Comments
For Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the fight for voting rights goes way back

‘Just come home’ — Black lawmakers reflect on their interactions with the police

It doesn’t matter if you went to Morehouse, or if you were an undercover CIA officer or even a police officer yourself, if you are a Black man, odds are your interactions with the police are more dangerous and memorable than for others. CQ Roll Call’s Clyde McGrady interviewed three members of Congress who reflect on what it was like for them and what was different for them in their encounters with law enforcement. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

21 minJUL 9
Comments
‘Just come home’ — Black lawmakers reflect on their interactions with the police

Latest Episodes

'The consulting class is going ape-s***' -- The Lincoln Project, explained

If you’ve been anywhere near cable news or social media in the last few months, you have probably seen an ad by the Lincoln Project. The group of Republicans who have aggressively gone after President Donald Trump on cable news and social media. Lincoln Project Senior Advisor Kurt Bardella,explains what motivates the group, what they hope to accomplish and the pushback they've gotten from their GOP brethren. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

20 min3 d ago
Comments
'The consulting class is going ape-s***' -- The Lincoln Project, explained

‘Surge’ part of ongoing surge in political documentaries

If you ran for Congress in 2018, there was a pretty good chance you are part of a political documentary. First came “Knock Down the House,” which featured a (then) little known candidate, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and now comes “Surge,” which follows women who ran against veteran Republican incumbents. Political Reporters Bridget Bowman and Kate Ackley spoke to Rep. Lauren Underwood, a star of “Surge,” and filmmakers Wendy Sachs and Hannah Rosenzweig about their new movie. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

23 min1 w ago
Comments
‘Surge’ part of ongoing surge in political documentaries

Keynote candidates and no-shows: Who we talk about when we talk about political conventions

One of the few things that is not different about this year’s political conventions is that the parties are providing valuable national airtime to candidates for Congress whom they want to see succeed. Who shows up, and who doesn’t, provide context for those House and Senate races, even if some of that context is, quite frankly, mystifying. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

25 min3 w ago
Comments
Keynote candidates and no-shows: Who we talk about when we talk about political conventions

Virtually the same? This year’s unconventional Democratic National Convention

We don’t need hindsight to see that 2020 is a year unlike any other in recent memory. The coronavirus pandemic has touched every fiber of our lives and woven itself inextricably into the fold of presidential politics, including the national conventions blanketing the airwaves this week and next. Usually, the Republican and Democratic parties live up to their collective nouns and really get down at these weeklong rallies, but that’s a no-go with a pandemic raging. Instead of convening in person, the conventions are going virtual. It’s yet another wholly unconventional move made this year that still somehow feels inevitable and even downright sensible. The conventions haven’t served their original purpose — actually picking a presidential candidate — since 1952. Both parties shifted to letting primaries and caucuses select their electoral champions — a move begun during the Progressive Era that accelerated in 1968 following the chaos that unfurled outside of the DNC in Chicago when several nights of protests led to a clash between police and demonstrators. The last time there was even a specter of doubt about who’d be the nominee was in 1980, when Ted Kennedy made a late push to replace President Jimmy Carter on the Democratic ticket. So perhaps it makes sense to finally drop the pretenses and hold an eight-hour infomercial over four nights. In a way, it’s a callback to an earlier time — campaigns used to regularly buy up prime-time, hourlong blocks on the networks to make televised appeals to the electorate. The pandemic has brought the parties full circle. To talk about this year’s decidedly different DNC, we spoke with Julia Terruso, 2020 presidential campaign reporter for The Philadelphia Inquirer. We also talked about the state of the race in Pennsylvania, the keystone battleground state for the Biden campaign. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

23 minAUG 20
Comments
Virtually the same? This year’s unconventional Democratic National Convention

'It's just history': Kamala Harris' historic run as VP

Kamala Harris' historic run as vice president comes at a time of big societal and generational changes. Roll Call columnist Mary C. Curtis, who covers the intersection of politics, culture and race, discusses the significance of the California Democrat's spot on the 2020 ticket with Joe Biden. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

25 minAUG 13
Comments
'It's just history': Kamala Harris' historic run as VP

‘It is exhausting’: Women in Congress recount shared experiences

Congress has a record number of women in its ranks, and it doesn't matter if they are Democrats or Republicans, junior members or elected leaders: They share a common set of experiences about being talked down to, overlooked or outright scorned. Heard on the Hill's Kathryn Lyons spoke to some of them and recounts their stories. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

30 minAUG 6
Comments
‘It is exhausting’: Women in Congress recount shared experiences

From middle school to Congress: Jamaal Bowman’s journey

Jamaal Bowman isn’t your average former middle school principal. That’s because the 44-year-old recently beat veteran Congressman Eliot Engel in the Democratic primary in New York’s 16th District. He's part of a changing of the guard of younger, minority politicians who are on their way to Congress. Clyde McGrady discusses his recent conversation with the educator-turned-prospective lawmaker. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

24 minJUL 30
Comments
From middle school to Congress: Jamaal Bowman’s journey

Remembering John Lewis, in his own words

Since Rep. John Lewis' death on July 17, his colleagues have paid tribute and remembered him in ways big and small. And his own words, like the ones we gathered here, make a fitting memorial to a figure whose public service crossed boundaries and generations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

10 minJUL 24
Comments
Remembering John Lewis, in his own words

For Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the fight for voting rights goes way back

The struggle to ensure people have access to the ballot box is one that G.K. Butterfield and his family have been involved in dating back to the early 20th Century. The North Carolina Democrat’s history in Wilson, N.C., is indelibly shaped by his immigrant father and his decades-long advocacy on behalf of Black suffrage in a place notoriously resistant to it. It extends through Butterfield's own place in the Civil Rights Era, and continues to the present day with his own legislative priorities. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

17 minJUL 16
Comments
For Rep. G.K. Butterfield, the fight for voting rights goes way back

‘Just come home’ — Black lawmakers reflect on their interactions with the police

It doesn’t matter if you went to Morehouse, or if you were an undercover CIA officer or even a police officer yourself, if you are a Black man, odds are your interactions with the police are more dangerous and memorable than for others. CQ Roll Call’s Clyde McGrady interviewed three members of Congress who reflect on what it was like for them and what was different for them in their encounters with law enforcement. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

21 minJUL 9
Comments
‘Just come home’ — Black lawmakers reflect on their interactions with the police
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