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Sound & Vision

KEXP

5
Followers
6
Plays
Sound & Vision

Sound & Vision

KEXP

5
Followers
6
Plays
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About Us

The Sound & Vision podcast from KEXP features interviews, panels, reporting and commentary that digs into the stories behind the music, with in-depth discussion of the most important issues facing music and arts communities. New episodes are published on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with bonus features throughout the week. Sound & Vision is hosted by Emily Fox and John Richards.

Latest Episodes

ODESZA on New Collaborative Project, BRONSON

Seattle electronic duo, ODESZA has teamed up with Australian EDM artist, Golden Features on a project called BRONSON. ODESZA talks about BRONSON’s new album, creating songs on opposite sides of the globe, and how COVID has impacted them as artists and the music industry as a whole. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

9 MIN2 d ago
Comments
ODESZA on New Collaborative Project, BRONSON

Fontaines D.C. on the Stories Behind 'A Hero’s Death'

The Irish band, Fontaines D.C. just released a new album, 'A Hero’s Death.' Frontman Grian Chatten shares the stories behind the title of the album and the final track, “No," and explains how the sea inspires his music. KEXP is a listener-funded nonprofit, and today we’re asking for your help to keep creating podcasts like this one. Donate nowto help reach our Summer Fundraising Drive goal! Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Fontaines D.C. on the Stories Behind 'A Hero’s Death'

How Taylor Swift Ended Up in KEXP’s Heavy Rotation

Taylor Swift has now achieved her seventh No. 1 Album on the Billboard 200 chart for her latest record, ‘folklore.' At the end of April, Swift reached out to Aaron Dessner of the National to make an album. Three months later, ‘folklore' was released. The album is being dubbed Taylor Swift’s first indie-folk record, andhas now been placed into heavy rotation at KEXP. KEXP’s Music Director Don Yates explains why he put Taylor Swift into rotation for the very first time. KEXP’s DJ Abbie also weighs in on the record and the themes it explores, including gender inequities in the music industry and beyond. KEXP is a listener-funded nonprofit, and today we’re asking for your help to keep creating podcasts like this one.Donate now to help reach our Summer Fundraising Drive goal! Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How Taylor Swift Ended Up in KEXP’s Heavy Rotation

Carla Sariñana on Burger Records and Sexism in the Music Industry

Carla Sariñana is a Mexico-based musician. Her solo project is called Silver Rose, she plays bass in Ruido Rosa and is also label manager at Devil in the Woods. She says she wasn’t surprised when she heard that California’s Burger Records folded after members of more than a dozen bands on the label were accused of predatory behavior, sexual misconduct and assault, especially towards fans who were minors. She’s familiar with the sexist culture of the music industry, saying when she lived in Los Angeles, bookers “wouldn’t give me shows unless I would go out for a beer with them.” Carla Sariñana joins Sound & Vision to discuss her reaction to the news about Burger Records and how labels have a duty to proactively prevent misconduct, the issue of gender-based violence and femicide in Mexico, the sexualized marketing of women in the music industry, and more. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Carla Sariñana on Burger Records and Sexism in the Music Industry

The Biography of Chris Cornell

Total F*cking Godhead: The Biography of Chris Cornell is out today. Author Corbin Reiff discusses the stories behind the music of the vocalist of Soundgarden, Audioslave, and Temple of the Dog. “Jeff Ament [of Pearl Jam] has once said that [Chris Cornell] is the best songwriter to come out of Seattle since Jimi Hendrix and that’s probably what I would go with his legacy as,” Reiff says. “He was just an immense talent. He had a lot of god given ability with his voice but he also had a lot of determination to become a great songwriter and he really pushed himself to do that, whatever it took to learn new skills, new tunings, new recording techniques. He was endlessly curious about that sort of thing. He might have been born with a lot of gifts but he really maximized them to the greatest ability.” Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

26 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Biography of Chris Cornell

Minneapolis’ History of Segregation in Music

The book, “Got to Be Something Here: The Rise of the Minneapolis Sound” by Andrea Swensson explores Minneapolis’ segregated music scenes and the systemic racism historically at play in the city. Swensson speaks with KEXP DJ Kevin Cole about theoverlooked bands and artists who shaped the city’s sound, the Highway Act that split largely-Black neighborhoods in Minneapolis and how Black artists, bands and venues were scrutinized by police and the local music industry. Swensson says Black artists told her they had to form racially integrated bands with white musicians as a form of survival. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

26 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Minneapolis’ History of Segregation in Music

The Lawsuit Over "Lady A"

A legal battle over the name "Lady A" has brought up questions around white privilege and racism in the music industry. Amid global protests against police brutality and systemic racism, the country group Lady Antebellum said they would change their name to Lady A. That’s because the word Antebellum, which in Latin translates to “before the war,’ is associated with the US Civil War and the Confederacy. However, there’s already a Lady A. She’s a Black blues singer based in Seattle who’s gone by the name Lady A for more than 20 years. Lady Antebellum, an all-white band is now suing Seattle’s Lady A for the trademark over the name. Seattle’s Lady A says that since the rebranding of Lady Antebellum to Lady A, her music has become buried on social media and music streaming sites. But she says her fight over her stage name isn’t just about music, it’s about the significance of a name from a historical perspective. She says white people have been taking from Black and Indigenous people for centuries, including their names. “When we came to this country, they [white people] took our names from us and gave us their names,” Lady A says. “This is about every Black, Indigenous person of this land and person of color who has had something taken from them– their land, their artistry, their culture, their language and their name.” Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
The Lawsuit Over "Lady A"

Billboard Bans Bundling

Billboardannouncedthis week that artists can no longer bundle album sales. Bundling is where an artist adds on, or “bundles” an album to a sale of a concert ticket or merch. For example, a fan would buy a ticket to a concert or an artist T-shirt and the artist adds in an album to that purchase. The idea was to game the billboard chart and count that sale of a ticket or sweatshirt as an album sale. The more album sales, the better your chances are of charting on billboard. Chris Molanphy is a pop critic, chart analyst and host ofSlate’s Hit Parade Podcast. He says bundling was a response to the streaming era of music. “The reason the industry has been eager to do this bundling tactic is that a traditional sale of an album counts far more for the chart than a stream does,” Molanphy says. However, Billboard is pushing back against the practice of musicians giving away albums for free when fans purchase tickets or merch. “Where the bundling thing just got shady was it was largely industry gamesmanship and it really, in Billboards own words, was not capturing consumer intent. Really the consumer went to buy a ticket or they went to buy a t-shirt, they didn’t go to buy an album, the album was an afterthought and now they are trying the best they can to measure consumer intent with these rule changes,” Molanphy says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

16 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Billboard Bans Bundling

Building Black Wealth

Seattle hip hop artist Draze released a single called"Building Black Wealth." The message was simple—build Black wealth by buying from Black-owned businesses. Draze discusses the single and its message. To understand the landscape of being a Black business owner in Seattle, Arif Gursel of the workspace,The Union, as well as Frank Ulwenya, the owner of Rumba Notes Lounge,talk about their experiences. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

32 MINJUL 16
Comments
Building Black Wealth

Martha Reeves on Motown and Going into Politics

In light of the news that Kanye West said he would run for president, we talk with another musician who went into politics. It’s Martha Reeves of Motown’s Martha Reeves and the Vandellas who had the hits, “Heat Wave” and “Dancing in the Streets”. She talks about her time as a Detroit City Councilwoman as well as Motown’s sound and how it united people when racial tensions were high in America. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

17 MINJUL 14
Comments
Martha Reeves on Motown and Going into Politics

Latest Episodes

ODESZA on New Collaborative Project, BRONSON

Seattle electronic duo, ODESZA has teamed up with Australian EDM artist, Golden Features on a project called BRONSON. ODESZA talks about BRONSON’s new album, creating songs on opposite sides of the globe, and how COVID has impacted them as artists and the music industry as a whole. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

9 MIN2 d ago
Comments
ODESZA on New Collaborative Project, BRONSON

Fontaines D.C. on the Stories Behind 'A Hero’s Death'

The Irish band, Fontaines D.C. just released a new album, 'A Hero’s Death.' Frontman Grian Chatten shares the stories behind the title of the album and the final track, “No," and explains how the sea inspires his music. KEXP is a listener-funded nonprofit, and today we’re asking for your help to keep creating podcasts like this one. Donate nowto help reach our Summer Fundraising Drive goal! Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Fontaines D.C. on the Stories Behind 'A Hero’s Death'

How Taylor Swift Ended Up in KEXP’s Heavy Rotation

Taylor Swift has now achieved her seventh No. 1 Album on the Billboard 200 chart for her latest record, ‘folklore.' At the end of April, Swift reached out to Aaron Dessner of the National to make an album. Three months later, ‘folklore' was released. The album is being dubbed Taylor Swift’s first indie-folk record, andhas now been placed into heavy rotation at KEXP. KEXP’s Music Director Don Yates explains why he put Taylor Swift into rotation for the very first time. KEXP’s DJ Abbie also weighs in on the record and the themes it explores, including gender inequities in the music industry and beyond. KEXP is a listener-funded nonprofit, and today we’re asking for your help to keep creating podcasts like this one.Donate now to help reach our Summer Fundraising Drive goal! Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

17 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How Taylor Swift Ended Up in KEXP’s Heavy Rotation

Carla Sariñana on Burger Records and Sexism in the Music Industry

Carla Sariñana is a Mexico-based musician. Her solo project is called Silver Rose, she plays bass in Ruido Rosa and is also label manager at Devil in the Woods. She says she wasn’t surprised when she heard that California’s Burger Records folded after members of more than a dozen bands on the label were accused of predatory behavior, sexual misconduct and assault, especially towards fans who were minors. She’s familiar with the sexist culture of the music industry, saying when she lived in Los Angeles, bookers “wouldn’t give me shows unless I would go out for a beer with them.” Carla Sariñana joins Sound & Vision to discuss her reaction to the news about Burger Records and how labels have a duty to proactively prevent misconduct, the issue of gender-based violence and femicide in Mexico, the sexualized marketing of women in the music industry, and more. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

13 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Carla Sariñana on Burger Records and Sexism in the Music Industry

The Biography of Chris Cornell

Total F*cking Godhead: The Biography of Chris Cornell is out today. Author Corbin Reiff discusses the stories behind the music of the vocalist of Soundgarden, Audioslave, and Temple of the Dog. “Jeff Ament [of Pearl Jam] has once said that [Chris Cornell] is the best songwriter to come out of Seattle since Jimi Hendrix and that’s probably what I would go with his legacy as,” Reiff says. “He was just an immense talent. He had a lot of god given ability with his voice but he also had a lot of determination to become a great songwriter and he really pushed himself to do that, whatever it took to learn new skills, new tunings, new recording techniques. He was endlessly curious about that sort of thing. He might have been born with a lot of gifts but he really maximized them to the greatest ability.” Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

26 MIN2 w ago
Comments
The Biography of Chris Cornell

Minneapolis’ History of Segregation in Music

The book, “Got to Be Something Here: The Rise of the Minneapolis Sound” by Andrea Swensson explores Minneapolis’ segregated music scenes and the systemic racism historically at play in the city. Swensson speaks with KEXP DJ Kevin Cole about theoverlooked bands and artists who shaped the city’s sound, the Highway Act that split largely-Black neighborhoods in Minneapolis and how Black artists, bands and venues were scrutinized by police and the local music industry. Swensson says Black artists told her they had to form racially integrated bands with white musicians as a form of survival. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

26 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Minneapolis’ History of Segregation in Music

The Lawsuit Over "Lady A"

A legal battle over the name "Lady A" has brought up questions around white privilege and racism in the music industry. Amid global protests against police brutality and systemic racism, the country group Lady Antebellum said they would change their name to Lady A. That’s because the word Antebellum, which in Latin translates to “before the war,’ is associated with the US Civil War and the Confederacy. However, there’s already a Lady A. She’s a Black blues singer based in Seattle who’s gone by the name Lady A for more than 20 years. Lady Antebellum, an all-white band is now suing Seattle’s Lady A for the trademark over the name. Seattle’s Lady A says that since the rebranding of Lady Antebellum to Lady A, her music has become buried on social media and music streaming sites. But she says her fight over her stage name isn’t just about music, it’s about the significance of a name from a historical perspective. She says white people have been taking from Black and Indigenous people for centuries, including their names. “When we came to this country, they [white people] took our names from us and gave us their names,” Lady A says. “This is about every Black, Indigenous person of this land and person of color who has had something taken from them– their land, their artistry, their culture, their language and their name.” Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

21 MIN3 w ago
Comments
The Lawsuit Over "Lady A"

Billboard Bans Bundling

Billboardannouncedthis week that artists can no longer bundle album sales. Bundling is where an artist adds on, or “bundles” an album to a sale of a concert ticket or merch. For example, a fan would buy a ticket to a concert or an artist T-shirt and the artist adds in an album to that purchase. The idea was to game the billboard chart and count that sale of a ticket or sweatshirt as an album sale. The more album sales, the better your chances are of charting on billboard. Chris Molanphy is a pop critic, chart analyst and host ofSlate’s Hit Parade Podcast. He says bundling was a response to the streaming era of music. “The reason the industry has been eager to do this bundling tactic is that a traditional sale of an album counts far more for the chart than a stream does,” Molanphy says. However, Billboard is pushing back against the practice of musicians giving away albums for free when fans purchase tickets or merch. “Where the bundling thing just got shady was it was largely industry gamesmanship and it really, in Billboards own words, was not capturing consumer intent. Really the consumer went to buy a ticket or they went to buy a t-shirt, they didn’t go to buy an album, the album was an afterthought and now they are trying the best they can to measure consumer intent with these rule changes,” Molanphy says. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

16 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Billboard Bans Bundling

Building Black Wealth

Seattle hip hop artist Draze released a single called"Building Black Wealth." The message was simple—build Black wealth by buying from Black-owned businesses. Draze discusses the single and its message. To understand the landscape of being a Black business owner in Seattle, Arif Gursel of the workspace,The Union, as well as Frank Ulwenya, the owner of Rumba Notes Lounge,talk about their experiences. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

32 MINJUL 16
Comments
Building Black Wealth

Martha Reeves on Motown and Going into Politics

In light of the news that Kanye West said he would run for president, we talk with another musician who went into politics. It’s Martha Reeves of Motown’s Martha Reeves and the Vandellas who had the hits, “Heat Wave” and “Dancing in the Streets”. She talks about her time as a Detroit City Councilwoman as well as Motown’s sound and how it united people when racial tensions were high in America. Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/sound/

17 MINJUL 14
Comments
Martha Reeves on Motown and Going into Politics
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