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The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

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The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

1.4K
Followers
8.6K
Plays
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Podcast by The Art of Manliness

Latest Episodes

#645: The Forgotten Story of the Lumberjack Commandos of WWII

Today, it's hard to go very long without hearing about special operations forces like the Army's Green Berets and the Navy's SEALs. But before special operators became an ingrained part of the military's strategy and established aprominent presence in the public eye, they existedas experimental, now largely forgotten units that were launched during the Second World War. One of the primarypredecessorsof today's commandoswas the 1st Special Service Force, which was known simply as the Force, and is described in a book of the same name by military historian Saul David. Today on the show, Saul explains how he came across the little known story of the Force and traces its origins to an idea formulatedby a British civilian scientist and championed by Winston Churchill which envisioned a unit that could accompanya fleet of snow tanks into enemy territory. Saul details how the Force was composed of men from both America and Canada, how members were recruited from the rough-and-ready ranks o...

46 min1 d ago
Comments
#645: The Forgotten Story of the Lumberjack Commandos of WWII

#644: How to Develop Greater Self-Awareness

95% of people say that they're self-aware. But only10-15% of people actually are. As my guest today says, that means "on a good day, 80% of us are lying to ourselves about how much we're lying to ourselves" and this blind spot can have big repercussionsfor our successand happiness. Her name is Tasha Eurich, and she's an organizationalpsychologist and the author of Insight: Why We're Not as Self-Aware as We Think, and How Seeing Ourselves Clearly Helps Us Succeedat Work and in Life. Tasha kicks off our conversation by arguing that our level of self-awareness sets the upper limit of our individual effectiveness and that self-awarenesscan be developed and is truly the meta skill of the 21st century. She then unpacks what it is you know about yourself when you possess self-awareness, how there are two types of this knowledge, internal and external, and how you can have one without the other. Tasha then outlines the seven pillars of self-awareness, the barriers to getting insights into t...

50 min6 d ago
Comments
#644: How to Develop Greater Self-Awareness

#643: Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers

Studying philosophy can be a metaphoricaljourneyinto wisdom. My guest today experienced it as not only that, but as a very literal journey as well. His name is Eric Weiner and he traveled thousands of miles around the world to visit the haunts of numerous philosophers as he sought to better understand their insights and how he might apply them to his own life. He wrote about this philosophic pilgrimage inThe Socrates Express: In Search of Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers.Eric andI begin our conversation with why he chose to take all his trips by train, and why rail travel is particularly conducive to thoughtful reflection. We then turn to the physical and philosophical stops he made on his journey, including why Marcus Aurelius wrote so much about getting out of bed and what ultimately motivated the emperor to start each day; what Thoreau can teach us about seeing; why Gandhi was very interested in the idea of manliness; how Nietzsche's idea of eternalrecurrence can change the way we live our daily lives; and the lesson Simone de Beauvoir offers us on aging well. We end our conversation with Montaigne's insight on how to get comfortable with death. Get the show notes at aom.is/socratesexpress. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

48 min1 w ago
Comments
#643: Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers

#642: Finding Money and Meaning in the Blue Collar Trades

When it comes to living their best life and building substantial wealth, many young men's first thoughts turn to developing a new app or starting a popular YouTube channel. They don't thinkabout digging ditches. But that's how my guest today became a millionaire, and he thinks more folks should considerseeking not only financial success, but true comfort, peace, and freedom, by rejecting society's standardized white collar career path, and looking into alternative routes through the skilled trades.His nameis Ken Rusk, he's a construction business entrepreneur who's also been a life coach and mentor to hundreds of his employees,and he's the author ofBlue Collar Cash: Love Your Work, Secure Your Future, and Find Happiness for Life. Ken and I begin our conversation with how a guy who got a job digging ditches in high school and skippedcollege went on to create a multi-milliondollar construction business. We then talk about how there aren't enough people pursuing blue collar work, and how this "skills gap" regardingthe trades is driving up demand, and in turn, the potential income to be made in this field. Ken talks about the cost-benefit analysis of going to college versus learning a skilled trade, and the advantagesto the latter. He then explains the often underappreciated reward of blue collar work, which he calls "the step back moment." From there, Ken shares some stories of folks who found fulfillment pursuing blue collar work, and even made that switch later in life. Along the way, Ken shares the life advice he gives employees and job seekers about how to manage their money, set goals, and pursue their own versionof happiness and success. Get the show notes at aom.is/bluecollarcash. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

37 min1 w ago
Comments
#642: Finding Money and Meaning in the Blue Collar Trades

#450: How to Make Time For What Really Matters Every Day [RE-BROADCAST]

This is a re-broadcast. The episode originally ran in October 2018. Do your days seem like a continuous blur of busyness, and yet you don’t seem to get much done, nor remember much about how you spent your time? As a former employee of Google, my guest today worked on the very apps and technology that can often suck away our time. Today, he’s dedicated to figuring out how to push back against these forcesto help people take control of their time and attention. His name is John Zeratsky and he’s the co-author of the bookMake Time: How to Focus on What Matters Every Day.Today on the show, John shares how the experience of feeling like he was missing months of his life led him to spending years experimenting withhis habits and routines, looking for the best ways to to optimize energy, focus, and time.He then shares thesimple 4-step daily framework that developed fromthis researchand walks us through that system.John talks about choosing one “highlight” each day to ensure your most important work gets done and that your life is full of memorable moments. He also shares how to reduce the time you spend wading in what he calls “infinity pools,” why energy management is just as important as time management, and how reflection is essential in figuring out if what you’re doing is working. Lots of valuable direction in this show for how to get your life on track and find more hours and meaning in the day. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

52 min2 w ago
Comments
#450: How to Make Time For What Really Matters Every Day [RE-BROADCAST]

#641: How Eisenhower Led — A Conversation with Ike's Granddaughter

From guiding the Allies to victory in World War II as supreme commander, to steering the ship of state for eight years as one of the country's least partisan and most popular presidents, few leadersin history have had to make as varied and consequentialdecisions as Dwight D. Eisenhower. My guest today possessesinsightsinto how he made the many choices he wasfaced with in his military and politicalcareers that are gleaned not only from studying Ike's life, but from personally knowing the man beneath the mantle. Her name is Susan Eisenhower and she's a writer, consultant, and policy strategist, one of Dwight's four grandchildren, and the authorof the new book How Ike Led: The Principles Behind Eisenhower's BiggestDecisions. Susan and I begin our conversation with her relationship with Ike as both historic leader and ordinary grandfather, and why she decided to write a book about his leadership style. We then dive into the principles of his leadership, beginning with his decision to gr...

62 min2 w ago
Comments
#641: How Eisenhower Led — A Conversation with Ike's Granddaughter

#640: Weird and Wonderful Ways to Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

When people start on a self-development journey, they'll sometimes create a bucket list -- all the things, all the typically exciting and pleasurablethings, they hope to do before they die. My guest started his own self-improvement journey very differently, by creating an anti-bucket list consisting of things he didn't want to do, and embarking on a "year of adversity." His name is Ben Aldridge and he's the author of How to Be Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable: 43 Weird & Wonderful Ways to Build a Strong, ResilientMindset. Ben and I begin our conversation with how his struggle with debilitating panic attacks inspired him to study philosophical and psychological ideas on how to fight back against his anxiety, what he learned that can benefit anyone looking to be more resilient, and how he was particularlyinspired by the Stoic idea of intentionally practicing adversity to prepare for adversity. We then talk about the project Ben set for himself of embarking on a year of mental, physical, and skill-based challenges designed to push himself outside his comfort zone, how he decided what kinds of challenges to do, and how doing hard things changed him. From there we get into the specific challenges Ben completed, from taking cold showers to learning Japanese, and what they taught him about self-discipline, facing your fears, and the human potential for growth. We end our conversation with the ways he's continued to push himself after the year of challenges was through, even in the midst of the pandemic lockdown, including climbing Mt. Everest from inside his house. Get the show notes at aom.is/getuncomfortable. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

45 min3 w ago
Comments
#640: Weird and Wonderful Ways to Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

#639: Why You Should Learn the Lost Art of Rhetoric

For thousands of years, the study of rhetoricwas a fundamentalpart of a man's education. Though it ceased to be commonly taught in the 19th century, my guest today argues that it's an art well worth reviving in the modern day. His name is Jay Heinrichs, and he's an expert in language and persuasion and the author ofThank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion.Jay and I begin our conversation with a description of whatrhetoricis, why after being taught around the world for centuries it fell out of favor as a component of education, and why it's still essential for everyone, especially leaders, to learn. We then unpack the difference between fighting and arguing, and how it’s the latter that’s a lost art, especially in our digital age. From there we discuss each of Aristotle’s three tools of rhetoric -- ethos, pathos, and logos -- including a dive into how the way your audience sees your character is so important, and ho...

57 min3 w ago
Comments
#639: Why You Should Learn the Lost Art of Rhetoric

#638: How Changing Your Breathing Can Change Your Life

When we think about improving our health, we typically think about altering our diet, trying to exercisemore, and taking vitamins and supplements. But my guest today argues that none of that stuff really matters if we haven't improved somethingeven more foundational: our breathing. His name is James Nestor and his latest book isBreath: The New Science of a Lost Art. At the beginning of our conversation, James explains why he paid thousands of dollarsto have his nose plugged up, and what happened to his body when he could only breathe out of his mouth. We unpack the dangers of the common problem of being a habitual mouth breather, including the fact that it can even change the shape of our faces, and why modern humans started breathing through the mouth rather than the nose. James then reveals what happened when he switched his experiment around and breathed only through his nose, and explains why simply switchingthe passagewayof your breathing from oral to nasal can have such signif...

46 minAUG 25
Comments
#638: How Changing Your Breathing Can Change Your Life

#637: What Poker Can Teach You About Luck, Skill, and Mastering Yourself

Maria Konnikova, who has her Ph.D in psychology and studies human behavior, had never played poker when she approached Eric Seidel, a renowned player of the game, asking him to show her the ropes. Eric agreed to be her coach and Maria spent a year working towards the World Series of Poker, playing in numerous tournaments and winning a major title and hundreds of thousands of dollars along the way. But the real prize she was after in this experimental endeavor wasn't money, but insight into the intersection between skill and luck, and how much control we humans have over our fate. She got those insights in spades, and shares them in her latest book:The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win. Today on the show Maria explains why the poker table may be the best place to learn about the balance between chance and skill, and why we have such trouble untangling those two forces. We then get into how gambling has long been an interest of philosophers and led ...

53 minAUG 20
Comments
#637: What Poker Can Teach You About Luck, Skill, and Mastering Yourself

Latest Episodes

#645: The Forgotten Story of the Lumberjack Commandos of WWII

Today, it's hard to go very long without hearing about special operations forces like the Army's Green Berets and the Navy's SEALs. But before special operators became an ingrained part of the military's strategy and established aprominent presence in the public eye, they existedas experimental, now largely forgotten units that were launched during the Second World War. One of the primarypredecessorsof today's commandoswas the 1st Special Service Force, which was known simply as the Force, and is described in a book of the same name by military historian Saul David. Today on the show, Saul explains how he came across the little known story of the Force and traces its origins to an idea formulatedby a British civilian scientist and championed by Winston Churchill which envisioned a unit that could accompanya fleet of snow tanks into enemy territory. Saul details how the Force was composed of men from both America and Canada, how members were recruited from the rough-and-ready ranks o...

46 min1 d ago
Comments
#645: The Forgotten Story of the Lumberjack Commandos of WWII

#644: How to Develop Greater Self-Awareness

95% of people say that they're self-aware. But only10-15% of people actually are. As my guest today says, that means "on a good day, 80% of us are lying to ourselves about how much we're lying to ourselves" and this blind spot can have big repercussionsfor our successand happiness. Her name is Tasha Eurich, and she's an organizationalpsychologist and the author of Insight: Why We're Not as Self-Aware as We Think, and How Seeing Ourselves Clearly Helps Us Succeedat Work and in Life. Tasha kicks off our conversation by arguing that our level of self-awareness sets the upper limit of our individual effectiveness and that self-awarenesscan be developed and is truly the meta skill of the 21st century. She then unpacks what it is you know about yourself when you possess self-awareness, how there are two types of this knowledge, internal and external, and how you can have one without the other. Tasha then outlines the seven pillars of self-awareness, the barriers to getting insights into t...

50 min6 d ago
Comments
#644: How to Develop Greater Self-Awareness

#643: Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers

Studying philosophy can be a metaphoricaljourneyinto wisdom. My guest today experienced it as not only that, but as a very literal journey as well. His name is Eric Weiner and he traveled thousands of miles around the world to visit the haunts of numerous philosophers as he sought to better understand their insights and how he might apply them to his own life. He wrote about this philosophic pilgrimage inThe Socrates Express: In Search of Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers.Eric andI begin our conversation with why he chose to take all his trips by train, and why rail travel is particularly conducive to thoughtful reflection. We then turn to the physical and philosophical stops he made on his journey, including why Marcus Aurelius wrote so much about getting out of bed and what ultimately motivated the emperor to start each day; what Thoreau can teach us about seeing; why Gandhi was very interested in the idea of manliness; how Nietzsche's idea of eternalrecurrence can change the way we live our daily lives; and the lesson Simone de Beauvoir offers us on aging well. We end our conversation with Montaigne's insight on how to get comfortable with death. Get the show notes at aom.is/socratesexpress. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

48 min1 w ago
Comments
#643: Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers

#642: Finding Money and Meaning in the Blue Collar Trades

When it comes to living their best life and building substantial wealth, many young men's first thoughts turn to developing a new app or starting a popular YouTube channel. They don't thinkabout digging ditches. But that's how my guest today became a millionaire, and he thinks more folks should considerseeking not only financial success, but true comfort, peace, and freedom, by rejecting society's standardized white collar career path, and looking into alternative routes through the skilled trades.His nameis Ken Rusk, he's a construction business entrepreneur who's also been a life coach and mentor to hundreds of his employees,and he's the author ofBlue Collar Cash: Love Your Work, Secure Your Future, and Find Happiness for Life. Ken and I begin our conversation with how a guy who got a job digging ditches in high school and skippedcollege went on to create a multi-milliondollar construction business. We then talk about how there aren't enough people pursuing blue collar work, and how this "skills gap" regardingthe trades is driving up demand, and in turn, the potential income to be made in this field. Ken talks about the cost-benefit analysis of going to college versus learning a skilled trade, and the advantagesto the latter. He then explains the often underappreciated reward of blue collar work, which he calls "the step back moment." From there, Ken shares some stories of folks who found fulfillment pursuing blue collar work, and even made that switch later in life. Along the way, Ken shares the life advice he gives employees and job seekers about how to manage their money, set goals, and pursue their own versionof happiness and success. Get the show notes at aom.is/bluecollarcash. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

37 min1 w ago
Comments
#642: Finding Money and Meaning in the Blue Collar Trades

#450: How to Make Time For What Really Matters Every Day [RE-BROADCAST]

This is a re-broadcast. The episode originally ran in October 2018. Do your days seem like a continuous blur of busyness, and yet you don’t seem to get much done, nor remember much about how you spent your time? As a former employee of Google, my guest today worked on the very apps and technology that can often suck away our time. Today, he’s dedicated to figuring out how to push back against these forcesto help people take control of their time and attention. His name is John Zeratsky and he’s the co-author of the bookMake Time: How to Focus on What Matters Every Day.Today on the show, John shares how the experience of feeling like he was missing months of his life led him to spending years experimenting withhis habits and routines, looking for the best ways to to optimize energy, focus, and time.He then shares thesimple 4-step daily framework that developed fromthis researchand walks us through that system.John talks about choosing one “highlight” each day to ensure your most important work gets done and that your life is full of memorable moments. He also shares how to reduce the time you spend wading in what he calls “infinity pools,” why energy management is just as important as time management, and how reflection is essential in figuring out if what you’re doing is working. Lots of valuable direction in this show for how to get your life on track and find more hours and meaning in the day. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

52 min2 w ago
Comments
#450: How to Make Time For What Really Matters Every Day [RE-BROADCAST]

#641: How Eisenhower Led — A Conversation with Ike's Granddaughter

From guiding the Allies to victory in World War II as supreme commander, to steering the ship of state for eight years as one of the country's least partisan and most popular presidents, few leadersin history have had to make as varied and consequentialdecisions as Dwight D. Eisenhower. My guest today possessesinsightsinto how he made the many choices he wasfaced with in his military and politicalcareers that are gleaned not only from studying Ike's life, but from personally knowing the man beneath the mantle. Her name is Susan Eisenhower and she's a writer, consultant, and policy strategist, one of Dwight's four grandchildren, and the authorof the new book How Ike Led: The Principles Behind Eisenhower's BiggestDecisions. Susan and I begin our conversation with her relationship with Ike as both historic leader and ordinary grandfather, and why she decided to write a book about his leadership style. We then dive into the principles of his leadership, beginning with his decision to gr...

62 min2 w ago
Comments
#641: How Eisenhower Led — A Conversation with Ike's Granddaughter

#640: Weird and Wonderful Ways to Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

When people start on a self-development journey, they'll sometimes create a bucket list -- all the things, all the typically exciting and pleasurablethings, they hope to do before they die. My guest started his own self-improvement journey very differently, by creating an anti-bucket list consisting of things he didn't want to do, and embarking on a "year of adversity." His name is Ben Aldridge and he's the author of How to Be Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable: 43 Weird & Wonderful Ways to Build a Strong, ResilientMindset. Ben and I begin our conversation with how his struggle with debilitating panic attacks inspired him to study philosophical and psychological ideas on how to fight back against his anxiety, what he learned that can benefit anyone looking to be more resilient, and how he was particularlyinspired by the Stoic idea of intentionally practicing adversity to prepare for adversity. We then talk about the project Ben set for himself of embarking on a year of mental, physical, and skill-based challenges designed to push himself outside his comfort zone, how he decided what kinds of challenges to do, and how doing hard things changed him. From there we get into the specific challenges Ben completed, from taking cold showers to learning Japanese, and what they taught him about self-discipline, facing your fears, and the human potential for growth. We end our conversation with the ways he's continued to push himself after the year of challenges was through, even in the midst of the pandemic lockdown, including climbing Mt. Everest from inside his house. Get the show notes at aom.is/getuncomfortable. See omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.

45 min3 w ago
Comments
#640: Weird and Wonderful Ways to Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

#639: Why You Should Learn the Lost Art of Rhetoric

For thousands of years, the study of rhetoricwas a fundamentalpart of a man's education. Though it ceased to be commonly taught in the 19th century, my guest today argues that it's an art well worth reviving in the modern day. His name is Jay Heinrichs, and he's an expert in language and persuasion and the author ofThank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion.Jay and I begin our conversation with a description of whatrhetoricis, why after being taught around the world for centuries it fell out of favor as a component of education, and why it's still essential for everyone, especially leaders, to learn. We then unpack the difference between fighting and arguing, and how it’s the latter that’s a lost art, especially in our digital age. From there we discuss each of Aristotle’s three tools of rhetoric -- ethos, pathos, and logos -- including a dive into how the way your audience sees your character is so important, and ho...

57 min3 w ago
Comments
#639: Why You Should Learn the Lost Art of Rhetoric

#638: How Changing Your Breathing Can Change Your Life

When we think about improving our health, we typically think about altering our diet, trying to exercisemore, and taking vitamins and supplements. But my guest today argues that none of that stuff really matters if we haven't improved somethingeven more foundational: our breathing. His name is James Nestor and his latest book isBreath: The New Science of a Lost Art. At the beginning of our conversation, James explains why he paid thousands of dollarsto have his nose plugged up, and what happened to his body when he could only breathe out of his mouth. We unpack the dangers of the common problem of being a habitual mouth breather, including the fact that it can even change the shape of our faces, and why modern humans started breathing through the mouth rather than the nose. James then reveals what happened when he switched his experiment around and breathed only through his nose, and explains why simply switchingthe passagewayof your breathing from oral to nasal can have such signif...

46 minAUG 25
Comments
#638: How Changing Your Breathing Can Change Your Life

#637: What Poker Can Teach You About Luck, Skill, and Mastering Yourself

Maria Konnikova, who has her Ph.D in psychology and studies human behavior, had never played poker when she approached Eric Seidel, a renowned player of the game, asking him to show her the ropes. Eric agreed to be her coach and Maria spent a year working towards the World Series of Poker, playing in numerous tournaments and winning a major title and hundreds of thousands of dollars along the way. But the real prize she was after in this experimental endeavor wasn't money, but insight into the intersection between skill and luck, and how much control we humans have over our fate. She got those insights in spades, and shares them in her latest book:The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win. Today on the show Maria explains why the poker table may be the best place to learn about the balance between chance and skill, and why we have such trouble untangling those two forces. We then get into how gambling has long been an interest of philosophers and led ...

53 minAUG 20
Comments
#637: What Poker Can Teach You About Luck, Skill, and Mastering Yourself

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