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KQED's Forum

KQED

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48
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KQED's Forum

KQED's Forum

KQED

34
Followers
48
Plays
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About Us

KQED’s live call-in program presents balanced discussions of local, state, national, and world issues as well as in-depth interviews with leading figures in politics, science, entertainment, and the arts.

Latest Episodes

Roe v. Wade Under Threat As Conservative Nominee All But Assured Seat on Supreme Court

President Donald Trump said he will name his nominee to succeed Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday -- a little more than a week after the death of the trailblazing feminist jurist. One of the top contenders is Amy Coney Barrett, whose conservative jurisprudence calls into question the future of Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that affirmed a woman's right to choose an abortion. We'll talk about the likelihood that a conservative majority would overturn Roe and what that would mean for women across the country, particularly those who live in states that already limit abortion access.

52 min2 d ago
Comments
Roe v. Wade Under Threat As Conservative Nominee All But Assured Seat on Supreme Court

Time is Running Out for the Combustion Engine in California

In an effort to wean California off carbon emissions, Governor Gavin Newsom has issued an executive order to ban sales of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035. The state's Air Resources Board will work out the details. It's a big move, but environmentalists say it's not big enough to slow climate change. We'll hear from energy experts about what else will have to change to accommodate all those electric and battery powered cars on the road. And how the market might be different next time you head out to kick some tires.

52 min2 d ago
Comments
Time is Running Out for the Combustion Engine in California

Maria Hinojosa’s New Memoir, ‘Once I Was You’ Tackles Immigration, Identity and How to Thrive in Journalism

Journalist and author Maria Hinojosa was, as she put, “the first Latina in every newsroom I ever worked in." In her new memoir, “Once I Was You,” the longtime host of NPR’s Latino USA tells the story of her life as an immigrant, storyteller and advocate, as well as her challenging rise in broadcast journalism. Hinojosa details her struggles with anxiety, managing family and career, and becoming a media entrepreneur. She also provides a window into the historical events that shaped her life and stories she reported on such as the Salvadoran refugees she befriended in college who were displaced by U.S. interventions in Central America. For decades, she has covered immigrants, the immigration system and the policies behind how America treats its most vulnerable residents. We’ll talk to Hinojosa about the book and the latest news.

52 min3 d ago
Comments
Maria Hinojosa’s New Memoir, ‘Once I Was You’ Tackles Immigration, Identity and How to Thrive in Journalism

With 200,000 Coronavirus Deaths, Federal Response Under Intensified Criticism

This week, the United States marked a grim milestone: more than 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus pandemic. Against this backdrop, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar moved to bar the national health agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, from signing off on any new rules without his consent. Azar's sweeping declaration, called by some as a "power grab," would affect regulation of the nation’s foods, medicines, medical devices and other products, including vaccines. That’s according to a September 15th memo, obtained by the New York Times. We'll talk about the federal response to the pandemic and how the nation is faring in its fight against COVID-19.

38 min3 d ago
Comments
With 200,000 Coronavirus Deaths, Federal Response Under Intensified Criticism

Anger and Disbelief Follow Kentucky Grand Jury’s Decision in Breonna Taylor Killing

Protesters across the Bay Area and nationwide continue to hold rallies today after a Kentucky grand jury declined yesterday to charge Louisville police in the murder of Breonna Taylor, who was shot in her home six months ago during a botched drug raid on a neighboring apartment. The grand jury brought criminal charges against only one of the three police officers involved in the raid for recklessing firing into the other apartment. We’ll talk about why the police avoided homicide charges and what’s next as advocates continue to fight for justice for Breonna Taylor.

13 min3 d ago
Comments
Anger and Disbelief Follow Kentucky Grand Jury’s Decision in Breonna Taylor Killing

Women’s Leadership on Climate Gets Spotlight in Anthology ‘All We Can Save’

The climate crisis isn’t just an environmental one — it is also a crisis of leadership. That's according to Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine Wilkinson, co-editors of the new anthology “All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis.” Johnson, a marine biologist and policy expert, and Wilkinson, author of "Drawdown," add that "we need feminine and feminist climate leadership, which is wide open to people of any gender." They feature examples of such leadership in their book, which presents the insights and expertise of diverse women leading on climate in the U.S. Johnson and Wilkinson join us to talk about the climate crisis, its multiplying threats and the women leaders addressing them.

52 min4 d ago
Comments
Women’s Leadership on Climate Gets Spotlight in Anthology ‘All We Can Save’

Matthew Yglesias on the Case for “One Billion Americans”

There are 330 million people in the United States. Vox co-founder and economics journalist Matt Yglesias makes the case for adding 670 million more in his new book, "One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger." With an increased population size, the U.S. could maintain its status as a world superpower, increase its wealth and improve its population’s standards of living, Yglesias argues. We'll talk about how his argument relates to current domestic policies on climate change, immigration and family benefits.

52 min4 d ago
Comments
Matthew Yglesias on the Case for “One Billion Americans”

Prison Scholar and Activist Ruth Wilson Gilmore on the Case for Abolition

Is prison necessary? That’s a central question in the work of longtime prison abolitionist and well-known prison scholar, Ruth Wilson Gilmore. A co-founder of activist organization Critical Resistance, Gilmore’s seminal book “Golden Gulag” analyzed California’s role in propelling both the prison building boom and tough-on-crime sentencing in the U.S. Today, criminal justice reform is under a brighter spotlight, as calls to defund the police have increased and as jails and prisons became hotspots for COVID-19 with effects rippling through surrounding communities. Gilmore joins us to share her thoughts on the movement to defund police and the case for abolishing prisons.

52 min5 d ago
Comments
Prison Scholar and Activist Ruth Wilson Gilmore on the Case for Abolition

Artist George McCalman Lays Bare White Racial Apathy in ‘Return to Sender’

In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, San Francisco-based artist George McCalman says that just as he was processing his own grief and anger, he found himself deluged with calls and emails from white acquaintances. Some of the messages expressed concern, but too many were clueless and empty, reflecting what he calls "an echo chamber of fragility." For his latest project, McCalman collected the phases that triggered him the most -- such as "Here if you ever want to talk" or "For your selfcare" -- and created paintings to reveal the "garish truth" that underlay them. We’ll talk to McCalman about his show, called “Tell Me Three Things I Can Do/Return To Sender.”

19 min5 d ago
Comments
Artist George McCalman Lays Bare White Racial Apathy in ‘Return to Sender’

California Hits Pause on New Unemployment Applications as EDD Restructures

Facing a massive backlog of 600,000 cases, California’s Employment Development Department says it will not accept new unemployment claims until October 5 as it works to restructure its website to process claims more efficiently. The temporary “pause” comes after a state government report called on EDD to address a number of problems with its claims processing, such as outdated technology and inefficient fraud detection. We’ll discuss the report and how EDD plans to tackle these issues.

32 min5 d ago
Comments
California Hits Pause on New Unemployment Applications as EDD Restructures

Latest Episodes

Roe v. Wade Under Threat As Conservative Nominee All But Assured Seat on Supreme Court

President Donald Trump said he will name his nominee to succeed Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday -- a little more than a week after the death of the trailblazing feminist jurist. One of the top contenders is Amy Coney Barrett, whose conservative jurisprudence calls into question the future of Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that affirmed a woman's right to choose an abortion. We'll talk about the likelihood that a conservative majority would overturn Roe and what that would mean for women across the country, particularly those who live in states that already limit abortion access.

52 min2 d ago
Comments
Roe v. Wade Under Threat As Conservative Nominee All But Assured Seat on Supreme Court

Time is Running Out for the Combustion Engine in California

In an effort to wean California off carbon emissions, Governor Gavin Newsom has issued an executive order to ban sales of new gas-powered vehicles by 2035. The state's Air Resources Board will work out the details. It's a big move, but environmentalists say it's not big enough to slow climate change. We'll hear from energy experts about what else will have to change to accommodate all those electric and battery powered cars on the road. And how the market might be different next time you head out to kick some tires.

52 min2 d ago
Comments
Time is Running Out for the Combustion Engine in California

Maria Hinojosa’s New Memoir, ‘Once I Was You’ Tackles Immigration, Identity and How to Thrive in Journalism

Journalist and author Maria Hinojosa was, as she put, “the first Latina in every newsroom I ever worked in." In her new memoir, “Once I Was You,” the longtime host of NPR’s Latino USA tells the story of her life as an immigrant, storyteller and advocate, as well as her challenging rise in broadcast journalism. Hinojosa details her struggles with anxiety, managing family and career, and becoming a media entrepreneur. She also provides a window into the historical events that shaped her life and stories she reported on such as the Salvadoran refugees she befriended in college who were displaced by U.S. interventions in Central America. For decades, she has covered immigrants, the immigration system and the policies behind how America treats its most vulnerable residents. We’ll talk to Hinojosa about the book and the latest news.

52 min3 d ago
Comments
Maria Hinojosa’s New Memoir, ‘Once I Was You’ Tackles Immigration, Identity and How to Thrive in Journalism

With 200,000 Coronavirus Deaths, Federal Response Under Intensified Criticism

This week, the United States marked a grim milestone: more than 200,000 deaths from the coronavirus pandemic. Against this backdrop, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar moved to bar the national health agencies, including the Food and Drug Administration, from signing off on any new rules without his consent. Azar's sweeping declaration, called by some as a "power grab," would affect regulation of the nation’s foods, medicines, medical devices and other products, including vaccines. That’s according to a September 15th memo, obtained by the New York Times. We'll talk about the federal response to the pandemic and how the nation is faring in its fight against COVID-19.

38 min3 d ago
Comments
With 200,000 Coronavirus Deaths, Federal Response Under Intensified Criticism

Anger and Disbelief Follow Kentucky Grand Jury’s Decision in Breonna Taylor Killing

Protesters across the Bay Area and nationwide continue to hold rallies today after a Kentucky grand jury declined yesterday to charge Louisville police in the murder of Breonna Taylor, who was shot in her home six months ago during a botched drug raid on a neighboring apartment. The grand jury brought criminal charges against only one of the three police officers involved in the raid for recklessing firing into the other apartment. We’ll talk about why the police avoided homicide charges and what’s next as advocates continue to fight for justice for Breonna Taylor.

13 min3 d ago
Comments
Anger and Disbelief Follow Kentucky Grand Jury’s Decision in Breonna Taylor Killing

Women’s Leadership on Climate Gets Spotlight in Anthology ‘All We Can Save’

The climate crisis isn’t just an environmental one — it is also a crisis of leadership. That's according to Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine Wilkinson, co-editors of the new anthology “All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis.” Johnson, a marine biologist and policy expert, and Wilkinson, author of "Drawdown," add that "we need feminine and feminist climate leadership, which is wide open to people of any gender." They feature examples of such leadership in their book, which presents the insights and expertise of diverse women leading on climate in the U.S. Johnson and Wilkinson join us to talk about the climate crisis, its multiplying threats and the women leaders addressing them.

52 min4 d ago
Comments
Women’s Leadership on Climate Gets Spotlight in Anthology ‘All We Can Save’

Matthew Yglesias on the Case for “One Billion Americans”

There are 330 million people in the United States. Vox co-founder and economics journalist Matt Yglesias makes the case for adding 670 million more in his new book, "One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger." With an increased population size, the U.S. could maintain its status as a world superpower, increase its wealth and improve its population’s standards of living, Yglesias argues. We'll talk about how his argument relates to current domestic policies on climate change, immigration and family benefits.

52 min4 d ago
Comments
Matthew Yglesias on the Case for “One Billion Americans”

Prison Scholar and Activist Ruth Wilson Gilmore on the Case for Abolition

Is prison necessary? That’s a central question in the work of longtime prison abolitionist and well-known prison scholar, Ruth Wilson Gilmore. A co-founder of activist organization Critical Resistance, Gilmore’s seminal book “Golden Gulag” analyzed California’s role in propelling both the prison building boom and tough-on-crime sentencing in the U.S. Today, criminal justice reform is under a brighter spotlight, as calls to defund the police have increased and as jails and prisons became hotspots for COVID-19 with effects rippling through surrounding communities. Gilmore joins us to share her thoughts on the movement to defund police and the case for abolishing prisons.

52 min5 d ago
Comments
Prison Scholar and Activist Ruth Wilson Gilmore on the Case for Abolition

Artist George McCalman Lays Bare White Racial Apathy in ‘Return to Sender’

In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, San Francisco-based artist George McCalman says that just as he was processing his own grief and anger, he found himself deluged with calls and emails from white acquaintances. Some of the messages expressed concern, but too many were clueless and empty, reflecting what he calls "an echo chamber of fragility." For his latest project, McCalman collected the phases that triggered him the most -- such as "Here if you ever want to talk" or "For your selfcare" -- and created paintings to reveal the "garish truth" that underlay them. We’ll talk to McCalman about his show, called “Tell Me Three Things I Can Do/Return To Sender.”

19 min5 d ago
Comments
Artist George McCalman Lays Bare White Racial Apathy in ‘Return to Sender’

California Hits Pause on New Unemployment Applications as EDD Restructures

Facing a massive backlog of 600,000 cases, California’s Employment Development Department says it will not accept new unemployment claims until October 5 as it works to restructure its website to process claims more efficiently. The temporary “pause” comes after a state government report called on EDD to address a number of problems with its claims processing, such as outdated technology and inefficient fraud detection. We’ll discuss the report and how EDD plans to tackle these issues.

32 min5 d ago
Comments
California Hits Pause on New Unemployment Applications as EDD Restructures
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