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Science Weekly

The Guardian

487
Followers
2.9K
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Science Weekly

Science Weekly

The Guardian

487
Followers
2.9K
Plays
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About Us

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts  Ian Sample,  Hannah Devlin and  Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here:  theguardian.com/covid19questions

Latest Episodes

The fight over the Hubble constant

When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isn’t easy. That’s because the two best ways of measuring what’s known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology? Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-called ‘Hubble tension’ with Prof Erminia Calabrese. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

19 MIN2 d ago
Comments
The fight over the Hubble constant

Covid-19: does more testing always mean more cases?

Since the beginning of the pandemic, ‘test, test, test’ has been the key message from epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists and healthcare professionals alike. But how does a country know if it’s doing sufficient testing? Or that it’s catching enough of the asymptomatic cases? Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Rowland Kao about the positivity rate, a value that can help to answer some of these difficult questions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

12 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Covid-19: does more testing always mean more cases?

How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis

Ian Sample speaks to marine biologist Prof Maoz Fine about his surprising research on the relationship between increasing ocean temperatures and the Red Sea’s coral reefs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis

Covid-19: How risky is singing?

With evolving evidence on airborne transmission of Covid-19 and early super-spreading events linked to choir practices, musicians have been left wondering how risky it is to sing and play instruments in person. Investigating a listener question, Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Jonathan Reid about the science of aerosols and why he’s getting musicians to sing into funnels — in the middle of an operating theatre. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

20 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: How risky is singing?

Are we in the midst of a new space race?

From Elon Musk’s SpaceX, to Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin – there is a growing interest in space exploration by some of the world’s least publicity-shy billionaires. But does the 2020 launch of the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft really mark the beginning of a new privately financed space race? And what do recent international launches, such as the UAE’s Hope probe to Mars, say about changing geopolitical ambitions for space exploration? Ian Sample speaks to space policy veteran Prof John Logsdon about the past, present and future of global space policy. This description was amended on 24 July 2020 to correct an error in the name of project associated with Jeff Bezos, which we called Blue Horizon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Are we in the midst of a new space race?

Covid-19: what can sewage tell us?

EIt may be a respiratory virus, but studies have repeatedly found traces of Covid-19 in the faeces of infected patients. Using this to their advantage, scientists are sampling untreated sewage from wastewater plants in an effort to track the virus. Hannah Devlin speaks to Andrew Singer about how what we flush down the toilet can help detect emerging outbreaks – days before patients begin presenting with symptoms. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

14 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: what can sewage tell us?

Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink

They are usually associated with toxic, murky lakes. But algae blooms are increasingly turning up in icy regions too. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Marian Yallop about the recent appearance of pink snow in the Italian alps, and what the growing numbers of algal blooms could mean for melting glaciers and ice sheets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink

Covid-19: the relationship between antibodies and immunity

With antibodies having implications for both our understanding of previous coronavirus infections and potential future immunity, Nicola Davis talks to Prof Eleanor Riley about how best to test for them and asks whether antibodies are the only thing we should be looking for. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: the relationship between antibodies and immunity

How many contactable alien civilisations are out there?

Could there really be other civilisations out there in the Milky Way? Nicola Davis talks to Prof Chris Conselice, whose recent work revises the decades-old Drake equation to throw new light on the possibility of contactable alien life existing in our galaxy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

17 MINJUL 9
Comments
How many contactable alien civilisations are out there?

Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?

Weeks and months after having a confirmed or suspected Covid-19 infection, many people are finding they still haven’t fully recovered. Emerging reports describe lingering symptoms ranging from fatigue and brain-fog to breathlessness and tingling toes. So why does Covid-19 cause lasting health problems? Ian Sample discusses some of the possible explanations with Prof Danny Altmann, and finds out how patients might be helped in the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15 MINJUL 7
Comments
Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?

Latest Episodes

The fight over the Hubble constant

When it comes to the expansion rate of the universe, trying to get a straight answer isn’t easy. That’s because the two best ways of measuring what’s known as the Hubble constant are giving different results. As each method becomes increasingly accurate, the gap between widens. Is one of them wrong? Or is it time to rejig the Standard Model of Cosmology? Madeleine Finlay investigates the so-called ‘Hubble tension’ with Prof Erminia Calabrese. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

19 MIN2 d ago
Comments
The fight over the Hubble constant

Covid-19: does more testing always mean more cases?

Since the beginning of the pandemic, ‘test, test, test’ has been the key message from epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists and healthcare professionals alike. But how does a country know if it’s doing sufficient testing? Or that it’s catching enough of the asymptomatic cases? Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Rowland Kao about the positivity rate, a value that can help to answer some of these difficult questions. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

12 MIN4 d ago
Comments
Covid-19: does more testing always mean more cases?

How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis

Ian Sample speaks to marine biologist Prof Maoz Fine about his surprising research on the relationship between increasing ocean temperatures and the Red Sea’s coral reefs. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

18 MIN1 w ago
Comments
How Red Sea 'supercorals' are resisting the climate crisis

Covid-19: How risky is singing?

With evolving evidence on airborne transmission of Covid-19 and early super-spreading events linked to choir practices, musicians have been left wondering how risky it is to sing and play instruments in person. Investigating a listener question, Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Jonathan Reid about the science of aerosols and why he’s getting musicians to sing into funnels — in the middle of an operating theatre. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

20 MIN1 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: How risky is singing?

Are we in the midst of a new space race?

From Elon Musk’s SpaceX, to Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin – there is a growing interest in space exploration by some of the world’s least publicity-shy billionaires. But does the 2020 launch of the SpaceX Dragon 2 spacecraft really mark the beginning of a new privately financed space race? And what do recent international launches, such as the UAE’s Hope probe to Mars, say about changing geopolitical ambitions for space exploration? Ian Sample speaks to space policy veteran Prof John Logsdon about the past, present and future of global space policy. This description was amended on 24 July 2020 to correct an error in the name of project associated with Jeff Bezos, which we called Blue Horizon. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

19 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Are we in the midst of a new space race?

Covid-19: what can sewage tell us?

EIt may be a respiratory virus, but studies have repeatedly found traces of Covid-19 in the faeces of infected patients. Using this to their advantage, scientists are sampling untreated sewage from wastewater plants in an effort to track the virus. Hannah Devlin speaks to Andrew Singer about how what we flush down the toilet can help detect emerging outbreaks – days before patients begin presenting with symptoms. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

14 MIN2 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: what can sewage tell us?

Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink

They are usually associated with toxic, murky lakes. But algae blooms are increasingly turning up in icy regions too. Hannah Devlin speaks to Prof Marian Yallop about the recent appearance of pink snow in the Italian alps, and what the growing numbers of algal blooms could mean for melting glaciers and ice sheets. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Booming blooms: how algae are turning the alps pink

Covid-19: the relationship between antibodies and immunity

With antibodies having implications for both our understanding of previous coronavirus infections and potential future immunity, Nicola Davis talks to Prof Eleanor Riley about how best to test for them and asks whether antibodies are the only thing we should be looking for. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16 MIN3 w ago
Comments
Covid-19: the relationship between antibodies and immunity

How many contactable alien civilisations are out there?

Could there really be other civilisations out there in the Milky Way? Nicola Davis talks to Prof Chris Conselice, whose recent work revises the decades-old Drake equation to throw new light on the possibility of contactable alien life existing in our galaxy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

17 MINJUL 9
Comments
How many contactable alien civilisations are out there?

Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?

Weeks and months after having a confirmed or suspected Covid-19 infection, many people are finding they still haven’t fully recovered. Emerging reports describe lingering symptoms ranging from fatigue and brain-fog to breathlessness and tingling toes. So why does Covid-19 cause lasting health problems? Ian Sample discusses some of the possible explanations with Prof Danny Altmann, and finds out how patients might be helped in the future. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15 MINJUL 7
Comments
Covid-19: Why are people suffering long-term symptoms?
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