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Understorey

RTRFM

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Understorey

Understorey

RTRFM

1
Followers
9
Plays
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About Us

In ecology, the understorey grows where light shines through the forest canopy.Our award-winning Understorey journalists highlight local and globally-connected environmental issues that the other media commonly pass over.RTRFM’s long-running dedicated environment program makers Adrian Glamorgan and Elizabeth PO’ bring together stories from near and sometimes afar, whether it be conservationists rehabilitating habitat, citizen scientists gathering data, campaigners at the frontline, or decision-makers at their desks, seeking solutions together to the challenges affecting our shared air, water, land and life processes.

Latest Episodes

Understorey: Planting Gingkos for Peace

On Monday, the people of Albany had a ceremony with twenty seven people attending, including members of the Albany Youth Advisory Council, and the young people, along with the Mayor of Albany, unveiled a peace plaque gifted by Mayors for Peace, next to a newly planted gingko biloba tree. The City of Busselton also had a gingko planting ceremony, and also a plaque, gifted by Mayors for Peace, and so too did Rockingham, and Subiaco, and Fremantle, and Cockburn. So why these gingko trees? A day before, from New York: fifty-six former presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers and defence ministers from 20 NATO member states, as well as Japan and South Korea, issued an open letter calling on their current governments to join the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. The link between trees and high-level clarion call is a commitment to peace across cultures and communities, on the day designated by the United Nations as the International Day of Peace. The Gingko biloba trees were all grown from seed collected in Hiroshima from a survivor tree of the 1945 atomic blast - a hibaku-moku. Photo: A. Glamorgan

--5 d ago
Comments
Understorey: Planting Gingkos for Peace

Understorey: Don’t Panic, Get Nonviolent!

Climate fiction, or Cli-fi, meets Sci-fi, meets fan fiction, meets peace literature, all linking up with nonviolent environmental protests in this ragged corner of the universe, with Dr Marty Branagan's tribute to Douglas Adams, boldly titled "Locked On! The Seventh and Most Illegal in the Hitchhiker's Guide Trilogy." Understorey commemorates International Day of Peace this coming Monday, as Adrian Glamorgan asks Marty about the role of fiction in enabling people to reflect on the protest experience, and link with protests both here and far, far away. Darlington will have its peace fair; various councils in WA will be planting gingko trees to commemorate 75 years since the Hiroshima atomic bomb: how will you celebrate the International Day of Peace in 2020? Montage: supplied photos from M Branagan and Stop Adani

--1 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Don’t Panic, Get Nonviolent!

Understorey: Divest Adani

Divestment is being defined as a tool of democratisation aimed at finance. Understorey follows the money, particularly when governments and companies don’t move to act on the developing global climate emergency. In the 21st century, environmentalists are increasingly asking big questions about corporations. Companies don’t breathe fresh air, or drink clean water. Their logic is to only accumulate profits for shareholders. But can the planet sustain that simplistic model of commerce? Adani's plans for Galilee Basin may impact on the global climate emergency, local communities, the Great Barrier Reef, water, Indigenous rights, and our shared future. Even if governments give such corporations legal approvals, many in the community argue that business needs a "social license to operate," properly embodying social expectations and environmental values. And if they are not required to do this by the regulators, perhaps market forces will see that they do. Elizabeth PO' speaks to campaig...

--2 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Divest Adani

Understorey: Forests For Life 2

Mark McGowan's Labor government in WA faces electors in March 2021, but his environment minister has been ignoring the findings of The Australia Institute 2016 report which says that the WA Forest Products Commission has been “barking up the wrong trees,” failing to protect remnant native forests, to get an economic return or to generate job growth via the government's investment in the Forest Products Commission. With their native forestry operations having posted repeated losses, also log quality and forest values steadily declining, and relatively few people employed in native forestry, the Australia Institute urged the state government back in 2016 to transition from current practices to protect both forests and state finances, so far to no avail. The WA Forest Alliance is campaigning strongly, saying there is alternative employment in high value use of timber, rather than felling old growth forests for charcoal. And most importantly, WAFA says Forest protection is the much-ne...

--3 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Forests For Life 2

Understorey: Forests For Life 1

The remnant high conservation value forests in our South West are at risk, still being logged, turned into charcoal, and wasted, even in their unique climate-saving and ecosystem-supporting roles. With precious old growth forests of trees that grow nowhere else on earth our isolated biodiversity hotspot is seriously threatened, as 90% of original growth is gone and important threatened species such Numbats and Baudin's black cockatoo need more protection. Three and half years into its first term the Labor government is still to launch a coherent state climate policy, and protected forests play a crucial role in reducing carbon. Last week a relaunch of the Forests for Life campaign with the Western Australia Forest Alliance (WAFA) gathered people to the Moores' Building in Fremantle, some voices including Noongar Yued elder Uncle Ben Taylor, his brother Uncle Alf Taylor (who'll be in next week's program), and WA Forest Alliance's Jess Beckerling, Shona Hunter, and Giz Watson. Photo: ...

--AUG 26
Comments
Understorey: Forests For Life 1

Understorey: Banking Good ~Investing in Landscapes

Understorey brings you positive news about banks – not Australian banks, but financial institutions that are operating globally, ready to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in sustainable landscapes, especially if different economic, social and environment interests can be facilitated to promote their cooperative advancement. These are the banks who could be interested in lending to mitigate climate change and help our living planet thrive. These are the banks in Europe which will be expected to mark green impacts on their key indicators, for any banking product. Paul Chatterton from the Landscape Finance Lab in Vienna, operating globally, talks to Understorey about this 21st century approach to banking that has moved organisations like WWF to broaden their focus from species, to habits, to ecoregions, to now encompass where the money goes and flows, to shape a more promising future where it's needed most. Photo: montage from photos supplied by WWF

--AUG 12
Comments
Understorey: Banking Good ~Investing in Landscapes

Understorey: Banking Bad ~Nukes

In the summer of 1945 Keijiro Matsushima glanced up and saw two beautiful silver planes in the sky. Within a moment, an atomic bomb detonated, his Hiroshima was destroyed, killing family and classmates. Within a few days, Nagasaki too experienced civilians being vapourised, burned and irradiated in the tens of thousands. After these nuclear attacks, the world changed for ever. But as the US breaches its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and modernises its nuclear forces, it may surprise you that some Australian banks, superannuation companies, and our national Future Fund, are making profits from their investments in nuclear weapons companies, and don’t think the question is even "controversial." The Medical Association for the Prevention of War (MAPWA) and the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) have set up Quit Nukes , to analyse and approach Australian financial institutions which are benefiting from nuclear weapons. MAPWA's Dr Margaret...

--AUG 5
Comments
Understorey: Banking Bad ~Nukes

Understorey: Boo Park’s Six Seasons

Booyeembara Park is widely know as a haven for its greenery-filled walkways through and around areas of gentle wetland, lake, grassed open spaces, and so much more ‘bushy’ development, for two decades growing out of an old quarry and sump site – but much less well known as a notable Indigenous gathering place. Now "Boo Park" locals have planted a new area of a “Six Seasons” design, reclaimed from another previously-closed section of the park’s 17 hectare footprint, informed by much research about Noongar culture and life in the area. Thousands of indigenous plants, with signage to come, show care and energy for reconciling an area of neglect and abuse, making for a welcoming acknowledgement of the distant past for future generations. With help from Commonwealth Environment program funding, guidelines about remediated sites from the Health Department and the Department of Environment, as well as design from Apace Natural Design, and help from SERCUL (South East Regional Centre ...

--JUL 29
Comments
Understorey: Boo Park’s Six Seasons

Understorey: Texan frackers eyeing the Kimberley

Since the oil glut and covid-19 pandemic, falling prices for fossil fuels means oil companies have been in trouble globally: in Texas, some oil and gas companies have been facing particular difficulties, leaving debts and abandoning methane-leaking drills, with 250 more companies expected to file for bankruptcy before the end of the year. A more optimistic private company from Texas is now eyeing off the Kimberley for its "natural resources" - and it doesn't mean tens of thousands of years of Aboriginal heritage, or outstanding tropical savannah habitat. Understorey speaks with Martin Pritchard from Environs Kimberley about Texan company Black Mountain Energy, which is keen to do destructive seismic testing prior to rolling out rigs by 2022, as it moves in to help industrialise the "natural resources" of the Canning Basin and help out with what it calls "nation building." Environmental campaigners are keen for the Environment Protection Authority to recognise the risks, but they are...

--JUL 22
Comments
Understorey: Texan frackers eyeing the Kimberley

Understorey: The Gap in our Defences

Understorey speaks with former army intelligence Clinton Fernandes, who is raising important questions about Australia’s sovereignty and capacity to manage its own affairs, because of our narrow economic base which has given the United States enormous influence over our military and foreign policy. This means spending an extra $279 billion on military hardware that will fit in with the US fighting approach. It means Pine Gap, and the potential for Australia to be complicit in drone war crimes for anywhere between Yemen to the Sea of Japan. It means North West Cape, which could drag Australia into a nuclear conflict, or play a part in an American first strike in the South China Sea, without Australia having much say over it. Remarkably, there is the lack of proper oversight over intelligence and security in our own country. And there is also the issue that currently the Australian parliament has no say about when Australia goes to war. The environment movement in Western Australia h...

--JUL 15
Comments
Understorey: The Gap in our Defences

Latest Episodes

Understorey: Planting Gingkos for Peace

On Monday, the people of Albany had a ceremony with twenty seven people attending, including members of the Albany Youth Advisory Council, and the young people, along with the Mayor of Albany, unveiled a peace plaque gifted by Mayors for Peace, next to a newly planted gingko biloba tree. The City of Busselton also had a gingko planting ceremony, and also a plaque, gifted by Mayors for Peace, and so too did Rockingham, and Subiaco, and Fremantle, and Cockburn. So why these gingko trees? A day before, from New York: fifty-six former presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers and defence ministers from 20 NATO member states, as well as Japan and South Korea, issued an open letter calling on their current governments to join the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. The link between trees and high-level clarion call is a commitment to peace across cultures and communities, on the day designated by the United Nations as the International Day of Peace. The Gingko biloba trees were all grown from seed collected in Hiroshima from a survivor tree of the 1945 atomic blast - a hibaku-moku. Photo: A. Glamorgan

--5 d ago
Comments
Understorey: Planting Gingkos for Peace

Understorey: Don’t Panic, Get Nonviolent!

Climate fiction, or Cli-fi, meets Sci-fi, meets fan fiction, meets peace literature, all linking up with nonviolent environmental protests in this ragged corner of the universe, with Dr Marty Branagan's tribute to Douglas Adams, boldly titled "Locked On! The Seventh and Most Illegal in the Hitchhiker's Guide Trilogy." Understorey commemorates International Day of Peace this coming Monday, as Adrian Glamorgan asks Marty about the role of fiction in enabling people to reflect on the protest experience, and link with protests both here and far, far away. Darlington will have its peace fair; various councils in WA will be planting gingko trees to commemorate 75 years since the Hiroshima atomic bomb: how will you celebrate the International Day of Peace in 2020? Montage: supplied photos from M Branagan and Stop Adani

--1 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Don’t Panic, Get Nonviolent!

Understorey: Divest Adani

Divestment is being defined as a tool of democratisation aimed at finance. Understorey follows the money, particularly when governments and companies don’t move to act on the developing global climate emergency. In the 21st century, environmentalists are increasingly asking big questions about corporations. Companies don’t breathe fresh air, or drink clean water. Their logic is to only accumulate profits for shareholders. But can the planet sustain that simplistic model of commerce? Adani's plans for Galilee Basin may impact on the global climate emergency, local communities, the Great Barrier Reef, water, Indigenous rights, and our shared future. Even if governments give such corporations legal approvals, many in the community argue that business needs a "social license to operate," properly embodying social expectations and environmental values. And if they are not required to do this by the regulators, perhaps market forces will see that they do. Elizabeth PO' speaks to campaig...

--2 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Divest Adani

Understorey: Forests For Life 2

Mark McGowan's Labor government in WA faces electors in March 2021, but his environment minister has been ignoring the findings of The Australia Institute 2016 report which says that the WA Forest Products Commission has been “barking up the wrong trees,” failing to protect remnant native forests, to get an economic return or to generate job growth via the government's investment in the Forest Products Commission. With their native forestry operations having posted repeated losses, also log quality and forest values steadily declining, and relatively few people employed in native forestry, the Australia Institute urged the state government back in 2016 to transition from current practices to protect both forests and state finances, so far to no avail. The WA Forest Alliance is campaigning strongly, saying there is alternative employment in high value use of timber, rather than felling old growth forests for charcoal. And most importantly, WAFA says Forest protection is the much-ne...

--3 w ago
Comments
Understorey: Forests For Life 2

Understorey: Forests For Life 1

The remnant high conservation value forests in our South West are at risk, still being logged, turned into charcoal, and wasted, even in their unique climate-saving and ecosystem-supporting roles. With precious old growth forests of trees that grow nowhere else on earth our isolated biodiversity hotspot is seriously threatened, as 90% of original growth is gone and important threatened species such Numbats and Baudin's black cockatoo need more protection. Three and half years into its first term the Labor government is still to launch a coherent state climate policy, and protected forests play a crucial role in reducing carbon. Last week a relaunch of the Forests for Life campaign with the Western Australia Forest Alliance (WAFA) gathered people to the Moores' Building in Fremantle, some voices including Noongar Yued elder Uncle Ben Taylor, his brother Uncle Alf Taylor (who'll be in next week's program), and WA Forest Alliance's Jess Beckerling, Shona Hunter, and Giz Watson. Photo: ...

--AUG 26
Comments
Understorey: Forests For Life 1

Understorey: Banking Good ~Investing in Landscapes

Understorey brings you positive news about banks – not Australian banks, but financial institutions that are operating globally, ready to invest hundreds of millions of dollars in sustainable landscapes, especially if different economic, social and environment interests can be facilitated to promote their cooperative advancement. These are the banks who could be interested in lending to mitigate climate change and help our living planet thrive. These are the banks in Europe which will be expected to mark green impacts on their key indicators, for any banking product. Paul Chatterton from the Landscape Finance Lab in Vienna, operating globally, talks to Understorey about this 21st century approach to banking that has moved organisations like WWF to broaden their focus from species, to habits, to ecoregions, to now encompass where the money goes and flows, to shape a more promising future where it's needed most. Photo: montage from photos supplied by WWF

--AUG 12
Comments
Understorey: Banking Good ~Investing in Landscapes

Understorey: Banking Bad ~Nukes

In the summer of 1945 Keijiro Matsushima glanced up and saw two beautiful silver planes in the sky. Within a moment, an atomic bomb detonated, his Hiroshima was destroyed, killing family and classmates. Within a few days, Nagasaki too experienced civilians being vapourised, burned and irradiated in the tens of thousands. After these nuclear attacks, the world changed for ever. But as the US breaches its obligations under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and modernises its nuclear forces, it may surprise you that some Australian banks, superannuation companies, and our national Future Fund, are making profits from their investments in nuclear weapons companies, and don’t think the question is even "controversial." The Medical Association for the Prevention of War (MAPWA) and the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) have set up Quit Nukes , to analyse and approach Australian financial institutions which are benefiting from nuclear weapons. MAPWA's Dr Margaret...

--AUG 5
Comments
Understorey: Banking Bad ~Nukes

Understorey: Boo Park’s Six Seasons

Booyeembara Park is widely know as a haven for its greenery-filled walkways through and around areas of gentle wetland, lake, grassed open spaces, and so much more ‘bushy’ development, for two decades growing out of an old quarry and sump site – but much less well known as a notable Indigenous gathering place. Now "Boo Park" locals have planted a new area of a “Six Seasons” design, reclaimed from another previously-closed section of the park’s 17 hectare footprint, informed by much research about Noongar culture and life in the area. Thousands of indigenous plants, with signage to come, show care and energy for reconciling an area of neglect and abuse, making for a welcoming acknowledgement of the distant past for future generations. With help from Commonwealth Environment program funding, guidelines about remediated sites from the Health Department and the Department of Environment, as well as design from Apace Natural Design, and help from SERCUL (South East Regional Centre ...

--JUL 29
Comments
Understorey: Boo Park’s Six Seasons

Understorey: Texan frackers eyeing the Kimberley

Since the oil glut and covid-19 pandemic, falling prices for fossil fuels means oil companies have been in trouble globally: in Texas, some oil and gas companies have been facing particular difficulties, leaving debts and abandoning methane-leaking drills, with 250 more companies expected to file for bankruptcy before the end of the year. A more optimistic private company from Texas is now eyeing off the Kimberley for its "natural resources" - and it doesn't mean tens of thousands of years of Aboriginal heritage, or outstanding tropical savannah habitat. Understorey speaks with Martin Pritchard from Environs Kimberley about Texan company Black Mountain Energy, which is keen to do destructive seismic testing prior to rolling out rigs by 2022, as it moves in to help industrialise the "natural resources" of the Canning Basin and help out with what it calls "nation building." Environmental campaigners are keen for the Environment Protection Authority to recognise the risks, but they are...

--JUL 22
Comments
Understorey: Texan frackers eyeing the Kimberley

Understorey: The Gap in our Defences

Understorey speaks with former army intelligence Clinton Fernandes, who is raising important questions about Australia’s sovereignty and capacity to manage its own affairs, because of our narrow economic base which has given the United States enormous influence over our military and foreign policy. This means spending an extra $279 billion on military hardware that will fit in with the US fighting approach. It means Pine Gap, and the potential for Australia to be complicit in drone war crimes for anywhere between Yemen to the Sea of Japan. It means North West Cape, which could drag Australia into a nuclear conflict, or play a part in an American first strike in the South China Sea, without Australia having much say over it. Remarkably, there is the lack of proper oversight over intelligence and security in our own country. And there is also the issue that currently the Australian parliament has no say about when Australia goes to war. The environment movement in Western Australia h...

--JUL 15
Comments
Understorey: The Gap in our Defences
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